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Wow! I’m shaking in my boots! I use two of them! They are a year old and left outside most of the time because of space limitations. I use two extra tie downs attached to hauler and frame to prevent moving and swaying
anyone know what size pipe fits?
Holey COW Batman!
That must take you what, maybe an hour to install each carrier, run the bikes up, then, 10,000 tie downs, and I see you're using auxiliary lights due to the fact that the Jeep tail lights are fairly obscured from following drivers, correct? Now, a question, what about the head lights and front turn signals, can anyone see those coming at you? I sort-a applaud your situation there, two bikes AND a Jeep for getting out and away from it all, yahoo!
Scott
 

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Wow! I’m shaking in my boots! I use two of them! They are a year old and left outside most of the time because of space limitations. I use two extra tie downs attached to hauler and frame to prevent moving and swaying
anyone know what size pipe fits?
That is a very sweet setup! Looks like you're ready for anything.
 

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I also have a Harbor Freight hitch hauler. Used it to haul my Grom around (225 LBS). Guess I will be reinforcing the thing now that I have traded the Grom for a 285 lb Suzukib Van Van.
 

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Hitch haulers are not created equal. Harbor is the bottom of the pack. Not because of origin but because they are the least expensive option out there. When one looks at the physics it’s clear hitch hauling is an iffy proposition at best with loads exceeding 100 lbs. one can do it but should you? Investing in a well made and designed haul unit would seem to be the smart thing to do. In reality the extra expense will pay off. If one is real smart ante up to a hydraulic lift hitch haul is really the best way to haul your momo. Save your back, protect your motorcycle, make for easier hauling. Hard when your cheap by nature but if you want to play you gotta pay. Safety is never cheap. I think Fred has better opinions than mine and practice experience.
 

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All these receiver hitch carries tend to stress the trailer hitch assembly much more than pulling a simple trailer.
Due to carrier and bike's center of mass being located further to the rear than a trailer ball any comparisons to static tongue weight ratings are not really applicable, please do not delude yourself.
Dynamically a receiver carrier also sees some big vertical impact loads going over bumps that a trailer never sees since trailer tends to react via rotation around its axle.
Haul vehicles with frame mounted trailer hitches are less susceptible to damage from the transferred loads than those with uni-body construction. My Astro van is due for its third revision of hitch-to-unibody mounting since I keep bending successively stouter steel reinforcements.
 

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i use one of the cheap Habor Freight type carriers. have hauled my bikes all over the western US for the last 4 years, 20,000 kms, without a problem. i do support the carrier from each end with a chain up to my tow hooks, i beleive this takes at least 1/2 the weight off of the stinger. it also removes all back and forth movement that would stress the mountings
 

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Grewen, is that a Princess Auto special? I have one that I use from time to time, but never for any long distance. My biggest concern has always been the fact that the cradle the bike sits in is made in two pieces and reinforces by that "bridge". Glad to hear that it is more robust than I thought.
 

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Grewen, is that a Princess Auto special? I have one that I use from time to time, but never for any long distance. My biggest concern has always been the fact that the cradle the bike sits in is made in two pieces and reinforces by that "bridge". Glad to hear that it is more robust than I thought.
yes, Princess crapola. i didn't like that it was 2 pieces either, it sagged when the bike was on it. i welded it into one piece and i welded some extra flat bar so the bolts wouldn't wear through. i tried to reinforce any thing that looked weak. and with the chains supporting from each side, i haven't seen any signs of wear. i have hauled various bikes, from honda ct90 to a suzuki dr650 and used the rack on 3 different trucks, all is still good
 

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Would there be a way to drive that front mount rig at night with only the stock lights?
i don't know how the lights would light the road, i don't drive at night and it would be hard to say as each truck is different. i can see my headlights through the bike, so maybe it would be ok with my set up. i know it would be inviting trouble with the cops at night
 

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Discussion Starter #33
Well, I strongly considered the Versahaul carrier for several days. However, I decided if I was going to spend that much money, I would be better off with a small trailer - which would also provide a considerable amount of utility use. And yet, the hitch carrier is the way I must go. I often haul my boat behind the E350 diesel van with the TW on a front hitch I installed shortly after acquiring the Dub. So, I ordered the Black Widow SMC-600R Deluxe Steel Motorcycle Carrier. It is rated for 600lbs and it considerably heavier duty than the Harbor Freight model. Just take a look at the difference in thickness on the main support...
IMG_20200605_160858.jpg


Should put a piece of round steel black pipe inside that and you will never have this problem. I would do that with any hollow carrier if possible.
Good tip, Errtu! I'll be attempting the same on the new carrier.
What is the thickness of the steel?
I measured the Harbor Freight model at a generous 3.5mm, while the Black Widow brand measured a solid 6mm.
Also, did it fail at the hitch pin? That’s not where you would expect a failure.
Actually, the Harbor Freight model has a built-in stabilizer that is rearward of the vehicle's receiver. It consists of a hold drilled THROUGH the main support of the hitch carrier, and a bolt with two plates that "clamp" on to the receiver. A major weak point!
 

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With Dave's post it's easy to see where to insert a piece of steel black pipe if you so desire to strengthen your carrier. If you smash the end a little it will fit in nice and tight. Drill the hole through for the hitch pin. You can really see how much stronger a good carrier is.
 

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Well, I strongly considered the Versahaul carrier for several days. However, I decided if I was going to spend that much money, I would be better off with a small trailer - which would also provide a considerable amount of utility use. And yet, the hitch carrier is the way I must go. I often haul my boat behind the E350 diesel van with the TW on a front hitch I installed shortly after acquiring the Dub. So, I ordered the Black Widow SMC-600R Deluxe Steel Motorcycle Carrier. It is rated for 600lbs and it considerably heavier duty than the Harbor Freight model. Just take a look at the difference in thickness on the main support... View attachment 205947


Good tip, Errtu! I'll be attempting the same on the new carrier.

I measured the Harbor Freight model at a generous 3.5mm, while the Black Widow brand measured a solid 6mm.

Actually, the Harbor Freight model has a built-in stabilizer that is rearward of the vehicle's receiver. It consists of a hold drilled THROUGH the main support of the hitch carrier, and a bolt with two plates that "clamp" on to the receiver. A major weak point!
Nice and strong. That 6mm is a little more that the 3/16” so the 600 lbs rating is reasonable.
 
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