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Discussion Starter #3
Yes those two sites due mention a 2018 model. One was printed in March and one was printed in April. Currently at web.yamahamotorsports.com/dual-sport the WR250R is not listed in the 2018 lineup only in the 2017 lineup. Hopefully the bike is undergoing improvements and Yamaha is still undecided on the msrp.
 

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Yes those two sites due mention a 2018 model. One was printed in March and one was printed in April. Currently at web.yamahamotorsports.com/dual-sport the WR250R is not listed in the 2018 lineup only in the 2017 lineup. Hopefully the bike is undergoing improvements and Yamaha is still undecided on the msrp.
I've seen this same thread brought up before. I wonder if the 2017 was a typo and they meant 2018?

On Advrider forum, before I got to the blah blah blah part of a thread regarding the wr250r, it seems like most were mentioning it being discontinued in Europe because of stronger emissions standards. There didn't seem to be any real answer on that thread either. Guess we'll know when they roll out the 18's at the dealers.

I don't know if/how/or why but the TW seems to defy all the sales numbers and hangs in there year after year. The TW has been DOA several times yet here it is...still. However, if nobody's buying something eventually they quit making it even if there continues to be a small market for it.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
A few years ago when I was at Daytona Bike Week I asked the yamaha reps which bike was their best seller WORLDWIDE and the 2 guys both said the TW was. They also added that was prolly due to licensing rules in Asian countries (under 200 cc). I have heard that here in the US that dealers must order 2 at a time as they only come as 2 bikes per pallet/crate.
 

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I think the TW hangs in there because of reliability, being easy to control, fun bike, cool wide tires, and easily customized for trails or the street, even though it's slower back roads. Of course a 300cc with a little more high speed stability and a 6th gear over drive would be killer. I have never bought new but that I would consider.
 

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I got a Facebook post from Yamaha that it has been discontinued and that only dealer stock will be available.
 

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I don't know if/how/or why but the TW seems to defy all the sales numbers and hangs in there year after year. The TW has been DOA several times yet here it is...still. However, if nobody's buying something eventually they quit making it even if there continues to be a small market for it.
At $4600 they seem intent on killing that off too....Buyers accept that 200cc is under-powered, but it was attractive in the $32-3500 range as a camping play bike. At almost 5k that's like a serious investment and you get up into a range with so many other possible models. Lack of interest won't be what kills the TW though, I fear it will be emissions (which is a complete joke because it's basically a lawnmower engine and the majority of TW owners put just a few hundred miles on it per year.)
 

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Evaporatibe emmisions seems to be the single biggest issue. Several Japanese sites confirm it's demise. I just was at a Yamaha dealer loooking at WRf vs. R for my son. Making the WR250f street legal turns it into a $8600 bike with a 120 to 200hr motor (7k miles or so?). Lots of reports of 30k or more on the R model. Granted, the f is a bad ass full race bike, but that makes it close to KTM or Husqvarna territory.
 

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Evaporatibe emmisions seems to be the single biggest issue. Several Japanese sites confirm it's demise. I just was at a Yamaha dealer loooking at WRf vs. R for my son. Making the WR250f street legal turns it into a $8600 bike with a 120 to 200hr motor (7k miles or so?). Lots of reports of 30k or more on the R model. Granted, the f is a bad ass full race bike, but that makes it close to KTM or Husqvarna territory.
If you're looking at doing a conversion, I'd grab the WR450: if well cared for, these motors should be good for four or five hundred hours. Still not great compared to 1,000 hours+ motors...

As for the WR250R, my take is that Yamaha will replace it with something many have been wanting forever (a WR450R or T3). That's what I'm hoping for, anyway. I would actually buy one, if Yamaha does this.
 

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Looks like due to poor worldwide sales there won't be a 2018 model. The Yamaha web site under Dual Sport has a 2018 XT250 and 2018 TW200 and only a 2017 WR250R. Will we finally see a WR400/450R ?? What about a T-4 ??
Drop the price and lower the damn seat....I would buy one in a NY Minute...:p
 

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Kawasaki dropped all 250 dual sports a couple of years ago...reason? Overload of inventory....once the 2013, 2014s, are gone they will ramp up production again...I suspect the same on the Yamaha....of course if they would just bring that 250TW over here, I don't doubt many of us would buy one....I know I would, and Montezuma agrees....
 

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I am basing my estimatss of 200hrs on a few reviews, this is the most detailed. I will add that almost every used bike we have looked at more then 3 or 4 seasons old either has had a rebuild or "needs a tune up". Needs a tune up on the modern 250cc 4 stroke race bikes= needs rebuild. 34+ hp on the race bikes vs. 25hp equates to additonal maintence and shorter service life.
http://dirtbiketest.com/fresh-dirt/yamaha-yz250fx-wr250f-long-term-wrap-up/#bqOmvGODl9l3PAct.97
 

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Its an interesting discussion but I think the main reason for the demise of these bikes is KTM raising the bar for everyone with cheap credit perhaps helping them along in recent times. Peoples expectations for a bikes capabilities has gone up, but the need for higher maintenance costs hasn't caught up accordingly yet.

I have never really believed in the dual sport label, and watching that KLR handle the mild conditions in the video confirms it...I'd rather stay home!
The problem is what the definition of sport is in the dual sport... Is that sport desert? swamps? dunes? rocks? hills? eastern woods? It requires a very different dual sports to be capable in the sport part of dual sport... Ideally the size and weight of 300cc is about all you want for tight woods trails...If you have to cover vast open tracts the requirements are very different....To get the 450's light enough for woods you'd need a converted racer...Yamaha will not sell a converted racer as dual sport in the US, they seem reluctant to even do a supermoto, it might be the regulations.

Likewise they will not be making a TW over 200cc...that would make it run foul of too many licensing hurdles and kill it's market value as a learner bike
 

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I don't buy Everide's conclusions in that video. Sure there are plenty of issues plaguing the market right now, but rest assured, as long as there are potential buyers out there (and there definitely are, and will be), someone is always going to find a way to sell to them. Even if the North American motorcycle market were to become devoid of Japanese dual sports, there would simply be a void created -- a void that would be filled by companies like AJP, SWM, and Zongshen/CSC.
 

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Death of the dual sport? Why did KTM/Husqvarna make all of thier enduros street legal? I think it is a market issue. The US market and regulations don't match much of the rest of the world. This makes building bikes for all markets tough, thus the lower volume, lower profit models get stagnant or cut.
 
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