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I will be hauling my bike home tuesday. The problem is I have a long bed f250 with a tool box mounted behind cab. The distance from tool box to tailgate is 70 inches. My bike is approx 82 inches.



Question, should I turn front wheel slightly and strap bike or turn whole bike slightly ?



Or....should I load straight/strap and leave tailgate down ?



Or.....should I borrow a friends rear hitch carrier ?



If I use the hitch carrier, does it need support on each side (I cant remember if his has side supports ?



Thanks for any opinions/advice.



Revolverman.
 

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I would go straight with the tailgate down, but nearly diagonal (front wheel still straight with bike, wedged between wheel well and toolbox sorta) with good chocking and strapping would be safest I think.
 

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I just go straight in and leave the tailgate down.


^^^+1



check this out...

http://www.ancra.com/consumer/pdfs/an_instb.pdf



their cam-style straps have a lot less moving parts than a ratchet strap so they fail less...i usually do a couple half hitches above and below the cam for piece of mind

http://www.ancra.com/



...this is in a 97 small 2WD toyota tacoma...i have bark busters on this bike so i tie off to those for more leverage (not like it's shown in the picture)...2 cam style straps to the front corners and in the rear i go across the back of the truck and loop the back tire to keep forward pressure on the bike (since the back of the rear tire is past the 2 rear tie downs in the truck)...i also keep the kickstand down and use the triangle stand in the rear for a little help and put it in first gear...well at least on this bike...on the TW i do the same minus the triangle stand and i just tie off to the handlebars under the crossbar

 

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Revolver, if it were me, I'd load it diagonal and have the tailgate closed. Your only putting in one bike I assume?

Also, whenever I tie down any load, I like to plan for the worst, not just what I need to get down the road. In other words, What if I have to do an emergency stop? What if I get run off into the ditch? That sorta thing.

So an extra strap of two is cheap insurance that in a bad turn of events, I don't get the bike coming through the back window, or worse yet, have it launch out into a mini van full of girl scouts.



When in doubt, throw on another Quality strap. I also stop at the end of our driveway ( a rough mile) and check my load.



I would rather be thought foolish, than careless.



Glad your bringing her home!!



Bag
 

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As I got older I have found that there is simply no "only way to go" and if there was it would be for a very brief time. New and better stuff is coming out all of the time.



I started hauling motorcycles in pickups and trailers back in the 60s. The original tie-down straps, both cam-type and ratchet, left a lot to be desired. The cam type would sometimes slip, particularly if they got wet, and the ratchet types were not nearly as flexible in use. If the strap was left long for more reach, and then you needed it for a shorter application, the strap would pile up under the retaining pawls, making them useless.



Both types have improved over the years, and I would trust either type to hold a bike securely if used properly.



I have hauled bikes as far north as Eagle Alaska, as far South as Cabo San Lucas in Baja, and as far East as the Rockies in Colorado. In the last 20 years I have never had a problem with either type strap.



In my personal experience, the only times bikes moved around when hauling was when the tire(s) moved sideways in the truck bed. Even then it was only when I was traveling over extreme terrain when 4 wheeling. I solved that problem by using wheel chocks. There are many brands of wheel chocks, and I have tried several. I like the Condor Chock because it is stable, fits any sized bike wheel, front or rear, and folds up flat for storage.



I just put the chock in the bed, adjusted for the wheel size, then roll the bike in and onto the chock. It will sit there upright until you tie it down. I use four straps of either type. When unloading, just remove the straps and the bike will sit there until you pull it off the chock. A good chock makes loading and unloading much simpler and easier, plus it takes a lot of strain off the straps when traveling. I like to keep the bike straight in the bed.It spreads the load better. If the tail gate will close, fine. If not, I travel with it down. No problem.



The Condor is just one of many chocks out there, and a lot of different places carry them. Here is one site:



http://www.customdynamics.com/condor_motorcycle_wheel_chock.htm
 

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Here is a pic of a Joe Hauler in use. You do need to have tie-downs from both directions. The haulers are a little quicker loading than putting them in a truck bed. They work great if you have an SUV instead of a pickup.



 

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I haul in a short bed F-150 supercrew. One bike; diagonal. Two bikes; tail gate down. Tie it down firmly and i won't move no matter what I've done yet.
 

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Go ahead and laugh. On three occasions the only thing that kept KLRs strapped down with cam buckle straps on the trailer was Tdub, who was held securely in place by her overkill ratchet straps with spring-loaded safety catch.



On one occasion, a BMW 650 was saved roadrash by Tdub and her ratchet straps with spring-loaded safety catches when we were run off the road, went airborne over the ditch, and landed hard enough to bottom the forks on the bikes, causing the s-hook straps on the BMW to come out of the eyebolt. Of the 3 bikes in the bed of the truck (F350 dualie that landed hard enough to bend the front axle) and 6 bikes on the trailer, only Tdub and an XT350 using identical straps did not shuck their bindings. 4 of the 7 other bikes ended up in the ditch, either from open hooks coming loose from fork compression or from hard yanks from the bumps slipping cam buckles. A couple s-hooks straighted, a couple straps broke.



On another trip, 3 bikes in a brand new enclosed trailer, 2 tied 4 straps with with s-hooks, 1 with custom straps with anchor shackles, a broken coupler resulted in the trailer upside down in a dry creek. 1 bike was dangling upside down, secure in its place by adequate securement. 2 bikes were damged beyond riding that weekend.



When everyone showed up to load for the next ride the following month, everyone had matching straps.



Dress for the crash, not the ride. Tie down for the crash, not the ride. It is not unusual for vehicles to approach 1g of force when braking and 0.5g of force in cornering or swerving during emergency manuevers on dry pavement. In the U. S. of A., federal law requires securement to be secure to at least those levels of force. There are no shock loads during emergency manuevers on dry pavement. Shock loads can cause forces to be much higher if the vehicle crosses a bump, hole, ditch, or curb, or strikes any object.



In the U. S. of A., federal law requires at least 2 straps on a TW if it is held in front by a suitable stop (wheel chock), or at least 3 straps if no stop, minimum work load limit(usually 25% of breaking strength), of at least 50% of the weight of the bike. Those 400-pound straps are insufficient. 600-pound straps are minimum.



In the U. S. of A., another federal law requires all vehicles (no exception for motorcycles) to be retained by a minimum of 4 tie downs, each with a work load limit of 50% of the weight of the vehicle. Again, that just about requires 4, 600-pound rated straps as a minimum for TWs.



Yup, go ahead and laugh. I'll ride home from the crash site again. You'll have to call for a ride (believe me, she's going to be pissed) as your bike will be going to the recycler with the rest of the scrap.



Jake, I hope you don't kill anyone with that poorly balanced load. The liability lawyers will have a field day with you. Stay out of Kentucky at night--they'll write you in a heartbeat for the misaligned headlights with a load like that.
 

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I would definely side with Qwerty on this one. He makes sense and I have been using tie downs of all types for over 40 years. My favorites are the ratchet type with a carabiner clip on the trailer (truck) side and built in web loops on the top. I buy them at Rockymountain ATV.com and they are the heavy duty type and not the sissy cheap ones. I have never lost a bike either.
 

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I used those blue tiedowns once hauling my bike in a trailer and on a corner the tiedown snapped in half. The continous abrasion of the tiedown throught the cam wears down the strap and it failed. Fortunately I was not going fast, and I saw it happens so I pulled over right away and the bike stayed in the trailer. Learn by my lesson.



I still use the "s" hooks, but I lash the hooks in place with the extra strapping that comes out of the tensioner.
 

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