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Discussion Starter #1
That the smaller and more inaccessible a nut or bolt is, the greater the likelihood that it will be rusted immobile, yet be imperative that it be removed to affect a particular repair. Also the more important it is to the function of the bike, the greater the likelihood that it will be of special design not replaceable at a hardware store.
Also the greater the likelihood that it will break upon removal. If it is the beginning of a weekend all this is most assuredly the case.
I spent the last couple of days working on my 750 Honda Aero. To set the valves, and replace the throttle cables and clutch cable.
It was a siege. First I had to remove the fairing, then the fuel tank and saddle. Then remove the spark coil and Air cleaner and all the rubber leading to the carb.
Then of course all the rubber tubes that concernes oil vents , fuel routing , vacume lines and such. Then the aluminum piece that is the vent at the top of each rocker cover.
At last I can remove the rocker covers and the side cover to the crank and timing marks on the flywheel. The rocker covers are an interference fit of course and difficult to remove without harming the gaskets. Slow and careful does it. Then put the crank at the proper dead center for the rear cylinder and adjust the valve clearance using a large hemostat to hold the adjuster bolt in place while tightening the lock nut. Rotate the crank into position for the front cylinder and do the same. After I completed this , I found the special tool for holding the rocker adjuster while tightening the lock nut. After the adjustments were made mind you. Okay so far it has been just go slow and take great care.
Now comes the removal of the throttle cables. To remove the rubber pieces to gain access meant dealing with the aforementioned tiny rusted screws in locations where I am not allowed to see them. Finally with copius use of profanity, I get to the cables themselves. To unscrew the lock nut on the cable fitting took nearly an hour as I only had enough room to barely get 1 sixth of a turn on the nut before re positioning the open end wrench, usually to find that the nut had sprung back just enough that I couldn't get a new purchase on the nut and had to do the same 1/6th turn again and try to hold the gain while repositioning the wrench. Rusty S.O.B. required the wrench for every 1/6th turn. No revolving it with fingers even if I could get them in there. At last it was off the end and I was able ( with great effort to get the old cable off the wheel of the carb.
This gave enough room to access the throttle return cable and it was the 1/6th turn process again for it too.
Once the cables were off it was possible to remove them from the handlebar grip device. I quit for the day as I had a fierce back ache from all the awkward position I had to assume to do this work.
Next day I began putting the new cables in. This went much easier since the new stuff was not rusted. New cables in and adjusted for tension, I began on the clutch cable.
With all the other stuff removed and out of the way, I could actually see what I was doing and get my fingers on things, so the only problem was rusty nuts again. but at least I could see and reach them with the wrenches. Again it was the 1/6th turn at a time siege to get the old cable adjustor off.
Again it was a piece of cake to install the new one because of no rust. Properly adjusted, I began to put the bike back together. It started right up and idled well and about 5 miles test ride showed no problems or further adjustments needed.
Why do I put up with this suffering you may ask? Because I know how difficult the job will be and do not trust a shop mechanic to take the same patience as me without resorting to a shortcut that will require further replacement of parts and more shop expense. Not to mention did he do as good a job as I would.
These things are what I accept as part of motorcycle ownership. NO I WON'T REPAIR SOMEONE ELSES BIKE! I will offer moral support and maybe hints and supervision, but I will not put my hands on someone elses' repair. They can either pay the mechanic and take the chance that he -she knows what they are doing, or go through the same learning experiences I have. All my riding friends do their own work for the same reasons.
At last I can again take pretty girls out for driveby shootings, they love it!
 

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PB blaster is your friend. Put it on a day ahead or even more.
 

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If nothing else the smell will kill ya.
 
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