TW200 Forum banner

1 - 20 of 43 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,645 Posts
Yes. This was the major part of my shoulder surgery this past winter. There were a couple other things torn and repaired while they were in there. Since my surgery the day before Thanksgiving, I have gained 95% mobility and about 90% of my strength back. Doc said he would take a while and he was right.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
664 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Yes. This was the major part of my shoulder surgery this past winter. There were a couple other things torn and repaired while they were in there. Since my surgery the day before Thanksgiving, I have gained 95% mobility and about 90% of my strength back. Doc said he would take a while and he was right.
Injury that caused it? Or a long term that made you go in?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,645 Posts
It was the fall off the mule last July caused by the hikers dog barking and running towards us.

After the MRI the doctors told me I had had an previous old separated shoulder and possibly a torn rotator cuff from that injury which over time healed somewhat. They saw gouges from bone on bone contact. Said this was probably 30 years ago type injury. I don't ever remember separating my shoulder though prior to last July's accident I had pain in my shoulder and was more evident when I rode motorcycle or mule. When not riding either, I never felt pain.

After the accident it was a good thing I went in. Had I not done anything it would not have healed properly on it's own and I would have had permanent shoulder damage I would have felt the rest of my life. And I would have been weaker in that shoulder which is my dominant side.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,645 Posts
Yeah, mine was just like that. ...and it throbbed like the dickens when I was just holding it still against my body for a few weeks. Sleeping was a whole 'nother story, very uncomfortable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
379 Posts
Yep. Blew my shoulder out playing hockey and over the next year and half it became sloppy. When it got the point it would dislocate once or twice a game .... I decided to call the season short and get it fixed up. I was only 18 and playing at a high level so I was very hard on my body in general.

My surgery was a day activity with a 2-3 days overnight stay and then home and onto physio. The worst part of the whole thing was the sling design ... it support your arm and wrapped around your midsection so you had to wash your armpit with a toothbrush. Oh and my car at the time was a manual, so I had to employ my best friend as a chauffer for the summer. :D

After a summer of rehab and physio it was back to normal and I was back on the ice playing at the same level with no issues.

Fast forward to now 20 years later its still pretty good .... once or twice over the years I had a "oh shit" moment where I almost dislocated it again, and my range of movement is limited at full rotation by a few degrees compared to my other arm. But the strength/dependability is there and everything works as it should. Honestly I don't think about it much and this is probably the most thought I have given it in many years.

Cheers,
Ian
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20,179 Posts
Much sympathy for you Flathats.
With your pain level there is no sense delaying getting a consultation, imagery and then a procedure to correct the issue. Unfortunately you will face a frustratingly long recovery as you will want to resume day to day activities before the body is fully healed.
Wife had knee surgury last week so we are about to leave for post-op evaluation by the SawBones, no fun getting older.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
664 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Much sympathy for you Flathats.
With your pain level there is no sense delaying getting a consultation, imagery and then a procedure to correct the issue. Unfortunately you will face a frustratingly long recovery as you will want to resume day to day activities before the body is fully healed.
Wife had knee surgury last week so we are about to leave for post-op evaluation by the SawBones, no fun getting older.
Thats the prob...ranch, farm, and my other two full time jobs...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,645 Posts
Yes, you would be down for a while 2-4 months before you can do some heavier stuff but it is well worth it in the end like Heli-Mech says. This is why for me I had the surgery in the winter, not has much mule or TW riding!:p
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
379 Posts
Thats the prob...ranch, farm, and my other two full time jobs...
The thing is man ..... it will only become easier to dislocate ..... and not any less painful each time.

Mine progressed to the point that me reaching to pick up a book would dislocate it. So if (when) it starts to get worse you won't be able to do any of the things you listed above and every time you thinks its better you'll go back to that list and probably do it all over again. It becomes a cycle that is hard to break.

I recommend biting the bullet and getting it done and you'll be back to 100% by Christmas .... the surgery is inevitable once it reaches a certain point .... so stubbornness will only get you hurt again and pissed off.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
664 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
The thing is man ..... it will only become easier to dislocate ..... and not any less painful each time.

Mine progressed to the point that me reaching to pick up a book would dislocate it. So if (when) it starts to get worse you won't be able to do any of the things you listed above and every time you thinks its better you'll go back to that list and probably do it all over again. It becomes a cycle that is hard to break.

I recommend biting the bullet and getting it done and you'll be back to 100% by Christmas .... the surgery is inevitable once it reaches a certain point .... so stubbornness will only get you hurt again and pissed off.
Thanks.... pm sent...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
827 Posts
If this is your first consult about your rotator cuff, it should go something like this;
1. You'll give a brief explanation of the pain, what initiates the pain, what instigated the injury and how the pain has progressed to where you wanted to talk to a doctor about it.
2. The doc will have you attempt several movements. Some will be free, some with resistance with him holding back and you pushing against that resistance.
3. You'll probably be prescribed ibuprofen or other inflammatory pain reliever. About 600 mg twice a day for 2 weeks to see if the inflammation will recede enough to allow your shoulder to feel better. At that time, you'll probably be told to lay off using the shoulder for anything heavy.
4. You will probably have to return after 2 weeks and be prescribed physical therapy. The Therapy can be of two types, usually a combination of resistance exercises using a rubber band-type device and a electrical pad that goes over the area to stimulate the muscles in an attempt to tighten up the ligaments and muscles so the area won't continue to be inflamed from the loose fitting of the joint.
5. You may also be x-rayed for the shoulder. It will probably include a shot of dye to see if the bursa is ruptured and leaking. It will also determine if there are any bone spurs causing the shoulder pain.
6. You will then be referred to a orthopedic surgeon. He will discuss the results of all that you've gone through so far. Most likely, and I HIGHLY recommend discussing this option if he doesn't mention it prior to a surgical solution, is that he will give you a cortisone shot. He will mix it with Novocaine so the shot isn't so painful. By the time you leave his office and head back to your car, all the shoulder pain will be gone. You will be so happy; better living through chemistry!! However, the shot will wear off after about 6 months or so. By that time, hopefully, your shoulder has mended itself and all the damage healed enough that you are no longer in pain.
7. Some time down the road, you will re injure your shoulder. Once damaged, it will always be susceptible to reinjury. At that time physical therapy, cortisone or surgery may be required.

I highly recommend NOT getting surgery until other options have been tried. Surgeons are like a 4 year old with a hammer; suddenly everything needs hammering. Surgeons are pretty egotistical and think surgery is the solution for most injuries. Cutting into healthy, non-diseased tissue should always be a last resort.

Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
664 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
If this is your first consult about your rotator cuff, it should go something like this;
1. You'll give a brief explanation of the pain, what initiates the pain, what instigated the injury and how the pain has progressed to where you wanted to talk to a doctor about it.
2. The doc will have you attempt several movements. Some will be free, some with resistance with him holding back and you pushing against that resistance.
3. You'll probably be prescribed ibuprofen or other inflammatory pain reliever. About 600 mg twice a day for 2 weeks to see if the inflammation will recede enough to allow your shoulder to feel better. At that time, you'll probably be told to lay off using the shoulder for anything heavy.
4. You will probably have to return after 2 weeks and be prescribed physical therapy. The Therapy can be of two types, usually a combination of resistance exercises using a rubber band-type device and a electrical pad that goes over the area to stimulate the muscles in an attempt to tighten up the ligaments and muscles so the area won't continue to be inflamed from the loose fitting of the joint.
5. You may also be x-rayed for the shoulder. It will probably include a shot of dye to see if the bursa is ruptured and leaking. It will also determine if there are any bone spurs causing the shoulder pain.
6. You will then be referred to a orthopedic surgeon. He will discuss the results of all that you've gone through so far. Most likely, and I HIGHLY recommend discussing this option if he doesn't mention it prior to a surgical solution, is that he will give you a cortisone shot. He will mix it with Novocaine so the shot isn't so painful. By the time you leave his office and head back to your car, all the shoulder pain will be gone. You will be so happy; better living through chemistry!! However, the shot will wear off after about 6 months or so. By that time, hopefully, your shoulder has mended itself and all the damage healed enough that you are no longer in pain.
7. Some time down the road, you will re injure your shoulder. Once damaged, it will always be susceptible to reinjury. At that time physical therapy, cortisone or surgery may be required.

I highly recommend NOT getting surgery until other options have been tried. Surgeons are like a 4 year old with a hammer; suddenly everything needs hammering. Surgeons are pretty egotistical and think surgery is the solution for most injuries. Cutting into healthy, non-diseased tissue should always be a last resort.

Good luck!
As I am working off the phone, since I can't reach a computer with my left arm..
Condensed version....

Lots of shoulder injuries in my life...

Cortisone at least twice a year....

Already saw this personal Dr for a shoulder injury in Sept of last year....

I am just wearing them out...

Left is very swollen with a mass of tissue at the top of my bicep....

Really appreciate the ideas!!!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
827 Posts
Well, yours is about the worst I've ever heard of before surgery. I hope you get a good surgeon. Mine was a Air Force captain who worked on a lot of trauma injuries in the military. He never had to cut me open, just the shots. So far. I reinjured my shoulder skiing this past winter. (Gotta learn I'm too old to huck it off 40' table tops, 80' doubles, half pipes, etc. Ha!)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
425 Posts
As I am working off the phone, since I can't reach a computer with my left arm..
Condensed version....

Lots of shoulder injuries in my life...

Cortisone at least twice a year....

Already saw this personal Dr for a shoulder injury in Sept of last year....

I am just wearing them out...

Left is very swollen with a mass of tissue at the top of my bicep....

Really appreciate the ideas!!!!!
I don't want to like because it might sound as if I like your pain. But while it was not the rotator cuff I had major surgery on my left shoulder when I was 24. Had too many little injuries and my shoulder was out of alignment and the shoulder blade was digging into my ribs. It was not fun. Just get it done so you can heal up before it gets worse.
 
1 - 20 of 43 Posts
Top