TW200 Forum banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey all -

I'm prepping for my first adventure trip (ever!) out at Big Bend national park. By adventure, I mean I'm hauling the Tdub in my Jeep Gladiator out there with my buddy (riding his DRZ), then finding as many off-the-beaten-path areas to take the TW. Most likely 2-3 hour jaunts away from the Jeep, then back to home base.

For this type of adventure, I'm looking for tips, tricks, and supplies I should be sure to bring with me. I have a feeling I don't know what I don't know. Additionally, it'll be ~40-50 degrees out during my rides.

All I've thought of so far is:
  • Personal safety (RevIt adventure jacket (3 season including thick liner) + pants + Scorpion AT-950 helmet + Forma ADV boots + gloves)
  • Basic tool kit
  • Tire inflator
  • First-aid kit
What other supplies should I pack for these fairly short trips? I think I should have some sort of tire repair but not sure how far to go in that regard.

Thanks for the pro-tips folks!

P.S. Recent pic of the TDub + Gladiator. They make a good pair!

209156
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,613 Posts
Looks like the weather will be improving down there...sadly our plans fell through a couple of times this year, but I will get back to Moab and Big Bend if I stay above ground, sooner{hopefully} or later...Borneo, New York Jim, Ft. Wayne Gary, Montezuma and I, got to see much and ride much of BB last time...I still have much to see, plus the Terlingua Ghost Town and the Big Bend State Park needs a ride and look as well...

Take plenty of photos...I got some good shots in 2016 but plan on stopping, snapping more photos and smell the Cactus...and

Give us a Full Report...

Montezuma sitting on his and me snapping a photo looking down Old Ore Road back in March 2016...and "The Window" @ Sunset...
Big Bend OOR.jpg
Big Bend Window Sunset 1a.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,613 Posts
As far as "tools" ... basic should do it, if the store at Panther Junction is open, you can always get beer there, or at the Rio Grande Campgrounds..:ROFLMAO:🍻
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20,811 Posts
No firearms allowed in the park.
If only gone for a few hours at a time then a flat often can be dealt with with simply replacing air with a pump periodically. Adding RideOn sealant before you leave home might prevent any loss of air during a puncture, or at least slow down the rate of loss and need to use the pump. Might not notice a nail until you get home or months later, RideOn can really work and save a trip.
With a buddy any more serious issues can be dealt with either by sending partner back for the Gladiator or have partner use a tow rope to tow you back to camp. Research tow techniques beforehand to avoid injury, doing it right is no more difficult than doing it wrong.

Chewing gum, tweezers and pliers can remove a variety of cactus thorns in increasing sizes in a variety of places on your body. Add one or more to basic first aid kit of simple bandages, etc.
Never have I encountered more rattlesnakes in one area than just outside the park but they should be fairly dormant or inactive this time of year. However just be alert. Same for early morning javalinas and wild burros on the road near draws, vegetation, and down by the river.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,613 Posts
As Fred says, "No Firearms in the Park" ... But as I can attest ...there were several lurking around on our last trip...yea, I know, every time certain folks travel through National Parks or the Peoples Republic of Illinois {among others} they are considered a felon, however better to be a Live Felon than a Dead Law Abiding "Victim" ... 🤠 Just don't be stupid with your "Peace Maker" ...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20,811 Posts
May you have a very good trip TW-Tex!
209191

Your gear plans sound very appropriate...just don't forget your park pass. Most national parks offer a little temporary sticker for motorcycle's windscreens showing "fees paid" at a glance.
209192
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
I LOVE all the photos and tips everyone. Thanks!

It sounds like since I'll be with a friend, have a truck nearby, that I might be pretty well covered if anything crazy happens.

Adding RideOn sealant before you leave home might prevent any loss of air during a puncture, or at least slow down the rate of loss and need to use the pump
Plus I'll pick up some RideOn to help.

Side note, I also picked up a battery powered pump and it's worked awesome so far! Super small, but can pump up to 150psi (um, just a bit more than we need in our TDubs, lol).

FOLLOW UP QUESTION:
Should we travel in the Jeep with an extra gas canister? Seems like a simple thing to have, but curious what you all think.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20,811 Posts
It has been years but I always carried extra fuel when doing mineral exploration in the Texas backcountry.
One would hate to have a spur of the moment inspiration to visit somewhere but realize you have to backtrack to Study Butte, Alon, or the Park's Convenience store first to safely have enough gas on board...that is unless you are based out of those locations and can start each day with full tanks.
Prices at those three available locations are only about $0.20 more per gallon than in Marathon.
 
  • Like
Reactions: NxtGoRnd

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,631 Posts
One thing I will add to that, is that the battery charging side doesn’t really come into play until the revs get into mid range. So if you have a non-kickstart bike, the small compressor may well deplete the battery coming off the trails. Fine on solid ground (bump start), not so much fun in sand …….
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
I've been thinking about this for the past couple days, so I have to tell this story:

I have a close family member who went to Big Bend back in the 90's to do some photography. He was by himself and lugging about 40 or 50 pounds of gear. He underestimated the burden of his load, his fitness, his water needs, and Mother Nature. He had parked and hiked around taking photos. He wasn't too far from his car, but he had run out of water and was overheating. He was suddenly exhausted, light headed and disoriented. The sun was beating down and he was so tired and confused that he decided he would lie down under some scrubby brush to "get some shade" and "rest for a minute." To make a long story short, he was found unconscious but still alive by a couple of hikers, who called in rescue. He was taken out on a stretcher and given IV fluids, and told that he was very, very, very, very lucky...

I know many or most of you guys ride in the desert and have a healthy respect for Mother Nature, but THIS why my suggestion was a little extra WATER. ;)

Have a safe trip!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20,811 Posts
10-4 on the water!
Cool this time of year but late one spring I was down there sampling a sedimentary basin a bit west of HWY 385 outside of the park. Afternoon temps had soared above 100 and it was a day I really should have started out in the early morning.
On foot, I had drunk all my water and my pack was getting ever heavier with samples collected for work as well as nicely fossilized wood specimens for me, almost opalescent with colorful chert I just couldn't walk away from.
Poor judgement is one symptom of dehydration and I sure had it. Trying to carry a 40 or so pound fossilized log seemed a reasonable thing to do at the time, after all only a few more miles back to the truck, right? Wrong. It exhausted my reserve & I eventually left it on a small ridge next to a pair of burrowing owl's nest figuring I would return for it some day. Never went back. 130 degrees inside the truck when I finally dragged my sorry ass out of that fiery furnace!
Hot water never tasted so good!
So extra water is always a good idea as well as electrolyte salts at times.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
LOTS of water. Got it :) But yes, we plan on overstocking survival supplies like that - the Jeep is good at hauling, so bonus!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
One thing I will add to that, is that the battery charging side doesn’t really come into play until the revs get into mid range. So if you have a non-kickstart bike, the small compressor may well deplete the battery coming off the trails. Fine on solid ground (bump start), not so much fun in sand …….
Ah right. The compressor I got is battery powered - so no drain on the Tdubs battery. It's a pretty sweet little piece of tech.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
May you have a very good trip TW-Tex!
View attachment 209191
Your gear plans sound very appropriate...just don't forget your park pass. Most national parks offer a little temporary sticker for motorcycle's windscreens showing "fees paid" at a glance.
View attachment 209192
Some seriously sweet photos!

I tried to pre-purchase a pass for the few days we'll be there, but from what I can find, I can only buy them at park entrances. Hoping they don't block park access because too many people are going there!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
126 Posts
Your estimate of 3-hr rides is likely low. Everything is far apart there.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top