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Discussion Starter #1
Motorcycles are like dogs.

They do better when there are more than one.

I have a 2013 Bonneville.

I do not know what my electrical system/stator can handle. I have an led headlight (Motogadget interactive) , I use Kosvo heated grips, and Denali D2 tri optic driving lights. I want to start using 12v clothing...jacket and pants and gloves. Will my 2013 Bonneville electrical support this load?

As a side note, what clothing might you recommend? It is important that you recommend pants, glove, and jacket that are the best in the world. Nothing imported if you can avoid it please. If imported, preferably from Europe.

Thank you. MBW
 

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I did not run any electrical accessories on my 2012 Triumph Bonneville, but I think your stator is good for 25 amps, at 1,000 RPM which would be at least 300 watts.
At, 3,000 RPM, 46.5 amps, which would be 665 watts.

How many amps/watts are you saving with the LED headlight?
How many amps/watts for your planned accessories?

Pending the load answer, I doubt you will have an issue, but you may need to be careful at idle speed.

How good is your voltage at idle? If barely above 12.8 with AGM battery, more load would probably be a deficit charge at idle and some load should be shed for more than a minute at a traffic signal.
However, the closer it is to ideal of 14.3 (13.8 to 14.8), the better is will likely handle accessory load at idle.

If 25 amps is a balanced charge, not a deficient, at idle, then at cruising speed, you may be able to handle up to 20 amps of accessories, plus difference of LED over stock H4 headlight.
 

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Well MBW, first off, I invested in a pair of freeze-out glove liners and a freeze-out balaclava. The gloves I got are Oakley, I call them penguin gloves as the thumb and fore finger are free and the rest is a mitten. Quite toasty with the liners. As for my jacket, it is just a Bilt Explorer Adventure jacket. It has a fleece zip in liner and the jacket is made of cor-dura. And my pants are Sedici, cor-dura material and a zip in thermal liner as well, not fleece but super warm. With everything on I have yet to get as much as a breeze through. Very warm, wind and water proof. After a while of riding at higher speeds my hands to tend to get chilly, but that is when I have been riding in less than 10* weather. I don't have heated grips or 12v anything. Mobility gets impeded some like when trying to turn your head fully or whipping your leg over the seat, but not enough to stop riding. But you're never as mobile as you would like to be when dressed for the cold. Haven't got boots yet but hand warmer packets are great for keeping toes warm.
Cor-dura material is the best material for jackets and pants in the world. No one should get pants or jackets without Cor-dura.
 

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Another thing to think about might be a battery kit dedicated to running the gear. Gerbing makes one that will run their gear. As far as i remember Gerbing has been the gold standard for heated undergarments for a while.
https://gerbing.eu/en/b12v-8000kit/#batteries-general
 

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I have the Gerbing clothing. They are marketed with all the Harley logos and such and sold as their gear. But a closer look reveals it is in fact Gerbing.
Under-jacket, gloves, pants. Have had for more than 10 years so I guess it would be described as the older style. They call their newest stuff micro-mesh.

Darn if they doesn't work as well as the day I bought it. True that it is the Gold Standard.

But they are making 12V battery in your pocket stuff now that is light years better than ever before. I'd never hook up my Gerbing stuff to the TW. That's for the Ural and the BMW's which have alternators like Power Plants. If my stuff does wear out I'll go with the self battery stuff. It's also a PITA being umbilicaled to a motorcycle in the first place.
 

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I've seen jackets/ vests on Amazon that will run on the regular lithium jump start batteries. The garments themselves don't even come with batteries. I already have one of these batteries. They claim the garment will heat up for up to 10 hours. seems like I could get additional batteries if needed.
Link: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07FLZ5C92/ref=sspa_dk_detail_0?psc=1

Anyone tried it?
 

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One advantage of isolated batteries for heated gear is the ability to ride at low speeds (low amp output from stator) without a charging issue.

Another advantage is not having to unplug when dismounting (intentional or otherwise!).

However, for long distance road trips (post one re 2013 Bonneville), power from the bike may be the best way to go.
 

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You might think about investing in ski clothing. I ski mountains in the middle of snow storms, temps in the single digits and speeds around 25/30mph all day long without too much, if any discomfort. I think the wind break and waterproof features of said clothing is what does it. I also wear one of those hoodie things under my helmet. Covers everything but my eyes which are covered in goggles.
The only heat I use riding my motorcycles is heated grips. I love those things! Some good deals on ski wear at local thrift stores. If you don't mind looking like a disco ball, you might even find a one-piece union suit style in 'bold' colors as well.
Another possible source of cold weather gear is army/navy military surplus stores. When I was stationed in Alaska, we were issued winter wear flight suits. Very comfy, slipped over street clothes easy and tons of zippered pockets easy to get to.
The US Olympic snow board team suits are 'interesting'; playing off the astronaut look;

https://mashable.com/2017/11/16/burton-winter-olympic-snowboard-uniforms-nasa/#BFnBpqD0wOqf

Ground Control to Major Tom.....



 

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Looks like gear fit for a space walk.
 

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View attachment 188302


You might think about investing in ski clothing. I ski mountains in the middle of snow storms, temps in the single digits and speeds around 25/30mph all day long without too much, if any discomfort. I think the wind break and waterproof features of said clothing is what does it. I also wear one of those hoodie things under my helmet. Covers everything but my eyes which are covered in goggles.
The only heat I use riding my motorcycles is heated grips. I love those things! Some good deals on ski wear at local thrift stores. If you don't mind looking like a disco ball, you might even find a one-piece union suit style in 'bold' colors as well.
Another possible source of cold weather gear is army/navy military surplus stores. When I was stationed in Alaska, we were issued winter wear flight suits. Very comfy, slipped over street clothes easy and tons of zippered pockets easy to get to.
The US Olympic snow board team suits are 'interesting'; playing off the astronaut look;

https://mashable.com/2017/11/16/burton-winter-olympic-snowboard-uniforms-nasa/#BFnBpqD0wOqf

Ground Control to Major Tom.....



 

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I use Warm & Safe heated gear exclusively now. I have the Gen 3 heated jacket liner, the Gen 4 jacket liner, 2 pairs of heated gloves, heated pants, heated socks, and the heated underlayer shirt.
The reason for all the gear, is it depends on what I'm wearing over it. My BMW EnduraGuard suit is a bit snug, so only a vest will fit. On my other gear, or if I lose weight (fat chance), I can wear jacket liners. One time, I wore the Gen 4 (better mesh heating element, and windproof) under my Klim Induction (Inductor?) mesh jacket. Not really waterproof, but got me back home dry and warm.
The jacket and gloves are on 2 circuits of my Neutrino (on the GS) that adjusts the output in relation to the outdoor temp.
The pants are on their own potentiometer, as the garment is VERY efficient and will burn your knees.

Been through the Gerbing stuff. Not the same since the company had issues.
Been through lots of "Harley Gear". Nice, but "Branded" and expensive.
Have an Aerostich Kanetsu heated vest. It has a tube that you blow up to inflate the vest to keep the heating system tight to your underlayer.

In my opinion, no one should ever buy any heated gear except from Warm & Safe. The garments have stood the test of Al and time and are the best there is.
The service from the company is outstanding. When you call, you will probably get the owner. Very nice people.
 

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I think I have ridden with you Smitty/Al when you were using that blow-up vest under your riding suit.
I thought you were just showing off :)
 

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I use Warm & Safe heated gear exclusively now. I have the Gen 3 heated jacket liner, the Gen 4 jacket liner, 2 pairs of heated gloves, heated pants, heated socks, and the heated underlayer shirt.
The reason for all the gear, is it depends on what I'm wearing over it. My BMW EnduraGuard suit is a bit snug, so only a vest will fit. On my other gear, or if I lose weight (fat chance), I can wear jacket liners. One time, I wore the Gen 4 (better mesh heating element, and windproof) under my Klim Induction (Inductor?) mesh jacket. Not really waterproof, but got me back home dry and warm.
The jacket and gloves are on 2 circuits of my Neutrino (on the GS) that adjusts the output in relation to the outdoor temp.
The pants are on their own potentiometer, as the garment is VERY efficient and will burn your knees.

Been through the Gerbing stuff. Not the same since the company had issues.
Been through lots of "Harley Gear". Nice, but "Branded" and expensive.
Have an Aerostich Kanetsu heated vest. It has a tube that you blow up to inflate the vest to keep the heating system tight to your underlayer.

In my opinion, no one should ever buy any heated gear except from Warm & Safe. The garments have stood the test of Al and time and are the best there is.
The service from the company is outstanding. When you call, you will probably get the owner. Very nice people.
Got to agree with SB..... Gerbing is no longer the standard. Since the company changed hands things have changed. I use Warm and safe on my FJ09, on snow machines and while down hill skiing. I have a 128,00 mAh batt that I use while skiing which I carry in a small hip pack.
 

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I rode several weeks ago when it was 16° out. My head froze quickly as I have a moto-cross helmet and was wearing safety glasses so my face was exposed at 60 M.P.H.

I had moto-cross gloves on and a pair of thin fleece gloves under them. My fingers went numb quickly.

My fleece lined Bilt armored jacket was more than warm enough along with my fleece lined carhartt work jeans.

With a fully protected face shield helmet and good gloves, I would have been fine.

With the wind chill, that calculates to -10° F.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Smitty: What does your gut tell you about me only getting a gen 4 liner and running it off of an sae connector? Will my Bonneville live? I have Kosvo heated grips, a cell charger, a gps, and a motogadget interactive headlight. Denali D4 trioptics. Am I going to be ok? Should I wire up the liner through a relay which would forgive me ...wouldn't it? Like a fuzebox?
 

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Smitty: What does your gut tell you about me only getting a gen 4 liner and running it off of an sae connector? Will my Bonneville live? I have Kosvo heated grips, a cell charger, a gps, and a motogadget interactive headlight. Denali D4 trioptics. Am I going to be ok? Should I wire up the liner through a relay which would forgive me ...wouldn't it? Like a fuzebox?
Pending Smitty's reply, have you added up amps/watts?
The type of gear is subjective, but power capability is a math question.

A relay uses small wires to close larger amp circuit.
This would allow power directly from the battery, operated by a low amp switch.
A relay is not a fuse.
If you run direct off the battery, with a relay, it definitely should be fused.
 

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If my speculation in post 2 is accurate, allowing up to 20 amps for heated gear, then run minimum 14 gauge wire from battery + to a 20 amp fuse, then to relay line position (30 on 4 pin relay).
Load will be position 87 to connector(s) of choice.

The relay coil should be activated by the ignition switch.
For example, the yellow wire from fuse 7 (tail and position light) would go to relay position 86, with position 85 grounded to complete the coil circuit.

See schematic on relay in this link. You don't need a 40 amp relay, but I am using this for the schematic.

https://www.oreillyauto.com/detail/b/masterpro-ignition-4352/lighting---electrical-16777/relays-16479/fuel-emission-relays-16559/a-i-r--control-relay-11546/01c1877ff05d/masterpro-ignition-4-terminal-relay/2dr1062/4506818?q=relay&pos=1

Bonneville wiring.jpg
 

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My gut tells me that SportsterDoc is correct. You have to add up the amps or watts and do the math. I am not a fan of British bikes, so I have no idea what the stator capacities are, nor any of the dynamic electrical loads. The math needs to be done.
I could "hazard a guess" with Harleys or BMWs, mostly because they have extremely capable electrical systems. I have not been able to bog down my GS, and it is farkled to death.
My memory tells me that British and Japanese bikes are severely under "watted".

For instance:

On my KLR, I can't run a jacket liner and a pair of gloves if I'm just putting around like we do on colder Sundays. If I'm doing alot of highway, the stator (alternator) will keep the Battery Tender Lithium battery charged. So, when riding the KLR, I choose to use heated gloves only. Because I always carry a jump pack, I don't worry about a restart.
Another note about this setup; When the AGM battery was in the KLR, even gloves could not be used. My theory on this is that the battery capacity was feeding the heated gear between high rpm blasts. I always use the largest lithium battery that will fit. Also, KLR Stators are notoriously weak.

The Gen4 liner is very nice. If you find yourself with limited electrical capacity, try the heated shirt. It uses less wattage, but is actually warmer. It is quite form-fitting. If you buy one, order two more in larger sizes and return the ones that don't fit. I wear my shirt for rides on some of the older Hondas that have crappy stators (PC800)

Sorry to not have a direct answer for you, but I would hate to steer you wrong.

P.S. I enjoy all of your posts.
 

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The "New" Triumph Bonneville is a good machine.
The build quality on my 2012 was excellent.

Compare 46 amps (re post #2) to pre EFI Sportsters at 22 amps and EFI Sportsters at 32 amps.

Appreciate your detailed advice on the gear, Smitty.
 

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Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
Smitty and Sportster Doc, thank you both for dumbing this down and walking me through it. I have my service manual. I will do the math. Where do you guys stand on this:

https://www.advdesigns.com/fuzeblock.html?gclid=EAIaIQobChMI16jDtcvp3wIVHbjACh01Vw1tEAQYASABEgLYbvD_BwE

I only want to run a heated liner (65 watts). The amperage draw is 8.6 amps there should be no drama with a ten amp fuse. My stock headlight was your everyday 50/65w. My motodemic light is Power Draw: 24.7 watts on low 41.6 watts on high; I have Koso Apollo grips are 39 watts on high (0.6A on the lowest setting and 2.8A on high) If this is correct, using the formula Watts = Amps x Volts means Watts = 2.8 x 14, which gives an estimate of about 39 Watts on high
My Denali lights are 6.6 amp draw and 10 watt draw on high. Tail and directionals are at best 9 watts. My dash pod lights are led.. What other variable do I need to plug in? I will do more legwork as I appreciate your help in this regard. Sportster Doc...thank you very much for the relay instructions and diagram. I like pictures. I am serious. Thank both of you for your time and clearly patience.

My question also. My multimeter is powered by smoke. When the smoke comes out of my multimeter, it stops working. To test my voltage at sitting idle what setting do I use for my multimeter? I have done this wrong once or twice. I want to see how close I am to 13.8 before the liner goes on.

My stock rectifier should not be a problem either, should it?

Please stay patient. Thank you both.

I do not even want a problem on idle/traffic lights. I am mapping out my third iron butt and the last time I made iron butt my first ride for the season after working on the bike all winter, I picked up a story for the ages.

How ok am I and how much fat do I have left in my system?
 
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