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Discussion Starter #1
I am picking up my new 2019 TW200 next week. Very excited to be joining the Tdub club!! Been riding the trails this past summer up here in Michigan on a Chinese Hawk 250, and I loved it...so much so that I decided to step up to the king of trail riding, and motocamping: the venerable Yamaha TW200.
 

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Welcome to the club. Saw your other post, sounds like a great deal you got there. Come on next Wednesday!

Marty
 

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Welcome!! :D
 

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Put on some handguards and a new front tire as soon as you can. I have a feeling you're going to be using that bike!!;)
 

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The stock front tire will leave you in the dirt, and I don't mean above it riding smoothly.
 
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Welcome welcome.

Since you're trail riding, definitely get handguards and a good skid-plate—pretty much everyone gets the Ricochet skid plate, as it's very thick aluminum... the stock one won't survive or protect much in real trails situations.

The front tire certainly has it's issues, and I have felt it slide out under me plenty of times. With that said, if you're paying attention, it's really going to be fine initially. I will definitely be updating to the Shinko 241 when I am ready to buy new tires. If you have the $$, it wouldn't be bad to update right away, but I don't think it's a must.

Good luck, have fun, send pics when you've got it!
 

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I don't think many appreciate the engineered energy dissipating qualities of the rubber isolation mounts of the stock skid plate and assume the marginally larger but rigidly mounted Ricochet must somehow be better. Just like the stout rigid frames of automobiles of the '30's must have been better than the controlled crunch of modern cars you think? Sure, the frames of those 30's autos could bang into something in a crash and endure, just too bad the driver died. However the car's next owner got a straight frame.;) A modern car's driver survives a similar crash.
That destructive energy in a bash has got to go somewhere, which means into the bike and then into the rider. If one can spread out the time duration of impact then peak accelerations are reduced. A few more milliseconds make a big difference. This is why we have foam rather than concrete lining our motorcycle helmets.
I ride my bikes hard in rocky terrain. My OEM plate took many a hit progressively getting dented and cracked while doing it's job of protecting bike & me. Consider it sacrificial armor if you like.
Certainly if used aggressively your Ricochet will have a greater probability of inducing broken incandescent filaments, broken frames and loosen dental fillings. I speak from experience.
If you want a good demonstration get two TWs side by side each with a different skid plate. Take turns sitting on each while having a partner really whack the skid plates with a club or baseball bat and you will feel the difference I have been trying to describe.
Nothing wrong with the Ricochet, looks great and only adds about 4 lbs. It just has an outdated inelegant mounting design for extreme use.
 

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I've never even so much as dented my OEM skidplate on either TW.....but then I don't ride like Tyler....or Fred.....or Admiral.....or anyone under 70. :eek: :p
Haha. I think that Ricochet has already saved me a few times on some very large rocks. I'm testing the TW (or more so my) limits on trails.
 
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I don't think many appreciate the engineered energy dissipating qualities of the rubber isolation mounts of the stock skid plate and assume the marginally larger but rigidly mounted Ricochet must somehow be better. Just like the stout rigid frames of automobiles of the '30's must have been better than the controlled crunch of modern cars you think? Sure, the frames of those 30's autos could bang into something in a crash and endure, just too bad the driver died. However the car's next owner got a straight frame.;) A modern car's driver survives a similar crash.
That destructive energy in a bash has got to go somewhere, which means into the bike and then into the rider. If one can spread out the time duration of impact then peak accelerations are reduced. A few more milliseconds make a big difference. This is why we have foam rather than concrete lining our motorcycle helmets.
I ride my bikes hard in rocky terrain. My OEM plate took many a hit progressively getting dented and cracked while doing it's job of protecting bike & me. Consider it sacrificial armor if you like.
Certainly if used aggressively your Ricochet will have a greater probability of inducing broken incandescent filaments, broken frames and loosen dental fillings. I speak from experience.
If you want a good demonstration get two TWs side by side each with a different skid plate. Take turns sitting on each while having a partner really whack the skid plates with a club or baseball bat and you will feel the difference I have been trying to describe.
Nothing wrong with the Ricochet, looks great and only adds about 4 lbs. It just has an outdated inelegant mounting design for extreme use.
Well said Fred! I think a lot of people feel that very little thought goes into certain areas of their bike by the manufacturer but in fact, an awful lot of engineering goes into every aspect of it. I've worked with Japanese automotive engineers on projects and believe me, there is not 1 molecule of a vehicle that does not get analyzed, scrutinized and optimized over and over again. I'm not saying the Ricochet skid plate does not have its place but I think a lot of folks underestimate exactly what you stated above when it comes to the shock absorbing design of the OEM plate. In most cases I've been fairly disappointed with aftermarket parts fit, function and finish. I try to stick with OEM if at all possible with the exception of handlebars, seats and grips.
 

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
Thanks to all of you for the great advice. Just picked up my bike and I have it in my trailer driving back home right now. It is definitely a cool little bike, and very fun to throw around. I drove it up and down the street at the dealership, and it is a nice handling, smooth-shifting little machine. I'm looking forward to Cutting Loose on the trails with this baby!
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I don't think many appreciate the engineered energy dissipating qualities of the rubber isolation mounts of the stock skid plate and assume the marginally larger but rigidly mounted Ricochet must somehow be better. Just like the stout rigid frames of automobiles of the '30's must have been better than the controlled crunch of modern cars you think? Sure, the frames of those 30's autos could bang into something in a crash and endure, just too bad the driver died. However the car's next owner got a straight frame.
A modern car's driver survives a similar crash.
That destructive energy in a bash has got to go somewhere, which means into the bike and then into the rider. If one can spread out the time duration of impact then peak accelerations are reduced. A few more milliseconds make a big difference. This is why we have foam rather than concrete lining our motorcycle helmets.
I ride my bikes hard in rocky terrain. My OEM plate took many a hit progressively getting dented and cracked while doing it's job of protecting bike & me. Consider it sacrificial armor if you like.
Certainly if used aggressively your Ricochet will have a greater probability of inducing broken incandescent filaments, broken frames and loosen dental fillings. I speak from experience.
If you want a good demonstration get two TWs side by side each with a different skid plate. Take turns sitting on each while having a partner really whack the skid plates with a club or baseball bat and you will feel the difference I have been trying to describe.
Nothing wrong with the Ricochet, looks great and only adds about 4 lbs. It just has an outdated inelegant mounting design for extreme use.
That is very interesting Fred. Haven't heard that particular viewpoint before. You make a great point. I wonder if putting rubber washers between the Ricochet plate and the frame, where the bolt runs through, would mitigate the negative effects on the bike. What do you think?
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Welcome welcome.

Since you're trail riding, definitely get handguards and a good skid-plate—pretty much everyone gets the Ricochet skid plate, as it's very thick aluminum... the stock one won't survive or protect much in real trails situations.

The front tire certainly has it's issues, and I have felt it slide out under me plenty of times. With that said, if you're paying attention, it's really going to be fine initially. I will definitely be updating to the Shinko 241 when I am ready to buy new tires. If you have the $$, it wouldn't be bad to update right away, but I don't think it's a must.

Good luck, have fun, send pics when you've got it!
I'm not sure which tire to get; the 241 4-18, or the 244 5.10-18. I want to be able to ride sand better, so I was thinking the 244, but just not sure.
 
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