TW200 Forum banner

1 - 20 of 27 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,355 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Since several people have recently shown interest in using a hammock for camping from the TW I figured I would post up these two videos. As you will see they did not go off without a hitch!:D




Hope this helps with any questions you may have had.



Tom
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,170 Posts
I'm s huge fan of Hennessy hammocks and on our ride and camp adventures I always take my hammock. A lot more comfortable than sleeping on a narrow pad. Nice videos.
Congrats on your retirement... I google earthed your town, that looks like a cool area to live and ride in. What are those orchards...olive trees? The terrain there looks to be quite mountainous and the lake looks amazing. Got any pictures and videos to share?
Rick
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
349 Posts
That is a sweet setup. So light and compact, I think I will buy just a cheapie hammock from amazon just to try it once. And if I like it I'll get one like you have.
I will have to carry a lot of rope to sling it from rocks or boulders though in this area, unless I go up into the mountains.
But, I wonder is it difficult to get into your sleeping bag in the hammock? It seems like it might be kinda hard. Thanks for going to the time and trouble to post the videos, Bob
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,355 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
That is a sweet setup. So light and compact, I think I will buy just a cheapie hammock from amazon just to try it once. And if I like it I'll get one like you have.
I will have to carry a lot of rope to sling it from rocks or boulders though in this area, unless I go up into the mountains.
But, I wonder is it difficult to get into your sleeping bag in the hammock? It seems like it might be kinda hard. Thanks for going to the time and trouble to post the videos, Bob
Bring a small square of plastic to set on the ground next to the hammock. Take your shoes off then step into your sleeping bag before sitting down into the hammock. It is actually very easy.


Tom

Sent from my SM-T310 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
I will post more photos/videos as I have just received my new camera for my handlebars. Living here, everything is so laid back. My TW is great for the trails that surround the lake, I spend hours just exploring new tracks and now a friend has purchased a TW too. The trees are olive trees, this areas main income is olive oil, each tree you see is worth €50 a year in olive oil. Unfortunately wild camping is frowned upon so we have to head for remote areas to camp, another great point for the TW, it goes anywhere. The lake is the largest in Andalucia and is stocked with big mouth bass up to eleven pounds, I fish every week from my kayak.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,170 Posts
I will post more photos/videos as I have just received my new camera for my handlebars. Living here, everything is so laid back. My TW is great for the trails that surround the lake, I spend hours just exploring new tracks and now a friend has purchased a TW too. The trees are olive trees, this areas main income is olive oil, each tree you see is worth €50 a year in olive oil. Unfortunately wild camping is frowned upon so we have to head for remote areas to camp, another great point for the TW, it goes anywhere. The lake is the largest in Andalucia and is stocked with big mouth bass up to eleven pounds, I fish every week from my kayak.
Sounds like you carved out a little piece of Heaven.

Tom...you ready for a road trip Jeff may need our help setting up his hammock. :p

Jeff when you say each tree is worth 50 Euro is that correct. $56 dollars.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,355 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Sounds like you carved out a little piece of Heaven.

Tom...you ready for a road trip Jeff may need our help setting up his hammock.

Jeff when you say each tree is worth 50 Euro is that correct. $56 dollars.
I'm in. No way the wife isn't going though! At least according to her

Tom

Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Each tree is worth $56 dollars in olive oil, every year. if you have two hundred trees you make $11,200 out of the olive oil pressed from their olives, every year. The olives are picked between November and March depending on the weather, they need rain to swell up. If anyone is ever visiting southern Spain we live in the mountains about an hour north of Malaga city. Your welcome to drop by.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,605 Posts
Very nice and informative Tom, Thanks for sharing your wisdom. But why no shoelaces? Need them to tie out the rain fly?:rolleyes:
I understand the benefits of the hammock but worry about finding appropriate trees in some locations. From your experience what is a suitable tree diameter and separation, as well as strap attachment height to keep fanny off of ground?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,355 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Very nice and informative Tom, Thanks for sharing your wisdom. But why no shoelaces? Need them to tie out the rain fly?:rolleyes:
I understand the benefits of the hammock but worry about finding appropriate trees in some locations. From your experience what is a suitable tree diameter and separation, as well as strap attachment height to keep fanny off of ground?
You Sir are WAAAAYYYY too perceptive!!! Truth be told those boots are 10 years old and had leather laces which rotted out about three years ago. They are however still waterproof and make for easy on easy off footwear for quick trips outside during the snowy months.

I would say a tree diameter of 6" is a good minimum number. I would make sure to move my straps up or down on the tree daily if I planned to stay more than one night on a small tree. This will help prevent girdling or permanent bark damage. As far as separation goes a minimum of 10' is required and a maximum "with the slap straps" is closer to 25'. As far as suitable height goes I find if you put the straps at eye level and tighten it properly it works out to about the perfect working height.


Tom
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,605 Posts
:thumbsup: Thanks Tom. So imagine preferred bedding depends on the temperature. Do you still use a conventional sleeping bag, or blankets of some sort? Take a rainfly of sorts to cover the bike/ tank bag too when there is a chance of rain? Like the tip about strategically leaving boots on plastic I suppose other gear and clothing can shelter under the hammock's tarp? Wouldn't want to overstuff the sliding storage on the ridgeline rope.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,355 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
:thumbsup: Thanks Tom. So imagine preferred bedding depends on the temperature. Do you still use a conventional sleeping bag, or blankets of some sort? Take a rainfly of sorts to cover the bike/ tank bag too when there is a chance of rain? Like the tip about strategically leaving boots on plastic I suppose other gear and clothing can shelter under the hammock's tarp? Wouldn't want to overstuff the sliding storage on the ridgeline rope.
Actually Fred I have used traditional sleeping bags, wool blanket, military poncho liner and under quilt/top quilt combinations. It really does just depend on the night time low temps. My current favorite spring/fall bag is this one from Sportsmans guide.


sleeping bag.jpg

It is not a high tech piece of gear but it does pack fairly small and is surprisingly warm for the price I paid. It does seem tailor made to sleeping in a hammock though!

As far as my TW I use a heavy duty space blanket and some bungee chords to protect the seat/tank bag/ backpack from wet weather. It works well. When I am not on my TW I just wrap my pack in the space blanket and set it below my hammock. I NEVER go into the woods without my space blanket and a tea candle.


Tom
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,170 Posts
Each tree is worth $56 dollars in olive oil, every year. if you have two hundred trees you make $11,200 out of the olive oil pressed from their olives, every year. The olives are picked between November and March depending on the weather, they need rain to swell up. If anyone is ever visiting southern Spain we live in the mountains about an hour north of Malaga city. Your welcome to drop by.
Thanks for the invite :D. One thing I like about this forum is it opens our eyes to areas we would normally never think about. If you are ever in the US we would love to meet you as well.
Are your olive groves experiencing the blight that Italy is experiencing?

I can see why olive oil is so expensive and it looks like the trees are spaced far apart. We have a Christmas Tree farm with the spacing at six foot apart. We have a choose and cut operation and are trees are ready for sale in 10-12 years at $45 a tree.
Are any of your olive groves being plagued with the blight like Italy is experiencing?

[video]http://www.slate.com/blogs/moneybox/2015/03/24/olive_tree_blight_xylella_fastidiosa_is_threatenin g_millions_of_groves_in.html[/video]

Sorry for the hijack Tom
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
343 Posts
Have the same Hennessey. Love it. Just got my TW 3 days ago, but come spring, it and the hammock will be going camping.

Someone asked about bedding, etc. The really important component is some insulation under you. In a tent or on the ground, your body will warm the ground you're laying on. In a hammock, the air under you will just keep sucking the heat out of you.
I've found an inflatable anything to be a bad idea since the air will cool that down too. A thin foam pad, cheapie yoga mat, thermorest, even those fold-out windshield sun blockers from your favourite cheap-o store work good.

Cheap hammocks have you laying like a banana, the Hennessy (and some others) is built with extra material at the top and bottom (kitty-corner) so you lay somewhat diagonally. That's the "asym" notation (asymmetrical). You actually lay darn near flat in the Hennessy...I've seen others that use the same concept, but I've never seen/used them. And the fly is also asymmetrical, so it matches the 'parallelogram' shape you make when you lay.

Quick, easy, no roots and rocks making your old bones sore, and loosen it off some and it makes a great chair. Combine that with the rain tarp and you have a bed, shelter, chair, and a covered cooking and dressing area.
With the snakeskins, you tie it off first in tube-form, then slide the skins back. If the ground is wet, etc, you can set up, sleep, and pack it back up without it ever touching the ground.

Love it. Can't wait for spring.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
GCfishguy, take a look on the hennessy website they have a sale on at the moment. I have the four season shelter that matches my hammock, it really makes a remarkable difference to the coldness from below. I have also had the zipper conversion by 2QZQ to my classic model so now have the option of removing the bug netting when not required. Both these things are well worth purchasing in my opinion. Happy hanging.
 
1 - 20 of 27 Posts
Top