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I have seen questions posted on high altitude performance so I thought I would post what I have experienced. I have recently returned from the s/w Colorado Rockies and I climbed over Ophir Pass elevation 11,789' on a 2005 TW200. It performed well but of course had noticeable power loss. Technical sections are fun on a TW because it takes some skill to negotiate extremely rough and steep sections at these altitudes because at times you have to feather the clutch and peg the throttle to stay in the power band. The bike is factory jetted.
 

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The highest I've been on mine is Rollins Pass- about the same elevation. Maybe it's because my expectations are different than a few of you here, but I don't really notice much difference.


Who knows though. None of the high elevation trails I've been on have been excessively steep or too difficult.
 

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Do you have the original 14/50 gearing? When I went over Ophir a couple of years ago I was real glad I had switched to 13/55 and a 122 jet for that short nasty section just below the top. I didn't have to feather the clutch. I had done a section of Taylor pass the year before with 13/50 and factory jet but it was not nearly as steep and rocky. That experience led me to find a 122 jet (because I couldn't find a 118, which would be preferable at 12,000 to 13,000). Feathering the TW clutch for more than a second or two without losing momentum or stalling is a real skill because the friction zone is so small.....a skill I apparently no longer have. :p
 

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I have seen questions posted on high altitude performance so I thought I would post what I have experienced. I have recently returned from the s/w Colorado Rockies and I climbed over Ophir Pass elevation 11,789' on a 2005 TW200. It performed well but of course had noticeable power loss. Technical sections are fun on a TW because it takes some skill to negotiate extremely rough and steep sections at these altitudes because at times you have to feather the clutch and peg the throttle to stay in the power band. The bike is factory jetted.
Welcome to the forum! :D
 

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122 main is perfect for those altitudes. Ive been over that pass with stock jetting and 14/47 gearing and i made it but the bike didnt like being over about 10,000. With the 122 main it rain great rven at the top of imogene which is a little over 13,000. Yeah it was a little low on power but no sputtering. I ran 15/54 on that trip and it really helped. From Gunnison to Crested Butte i could still pull 55-60mpg with the 14/47 i couldn't muster much over 45 as the bike just didnt have the HP to pull that gear at that altitude.

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My bike wouldn't even run at 7800-8500 feet elevation this weekend. I couldn't even climb a hill in 1st gear due to it drowning itself in fuel. I remembered the previous owner had mentioned he did the carb mod so after some fiddling with different tools I found out he had the "adjustment" screw on the carb turned out about 4.5 turns. I had to turn it almost all the way in for it to run right up here. It's backed out probably 1/4 turn right now and it's still running rich... (sputtering if I go full throttle at lower RPM)
 

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gtmotor, perhaps remove any needle shims too, something you can do if you don't have access to leaner jets on your trip.
It is fairly easy to check for this often used low elevation carb mod.
 
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