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Discussion Starter #1
Here's the generator I purchased after a hurricane decided to visit inland Florida a few years ago.







It's an excellent generator. Easy to start, and very quiet compared to other generators of its size.



I start it up only once a year at the beginning of hurricane season to make sure it's working.



I put a double dose of Stabil in it, along with filling the tank with fresh gas (E10, only thing available here).



This past year I used Seafoam instead.







This year it didn't want to start.



The battery was dead and wouldn't take a charge, and would not start with the rope pull starter.



A new Shorai battery went in. Cranked and cranked and still it would not start.







So I siphoned out most of the gas, then drained the last bit through the carb drain.



The gas didn't look good.



When I put it in, it was clear.



I'm afraid this is what the gas in our TW's



looks like after sitting all winter.







I have to admit I'm one that thinks of the most complicated solution first, instead of the simplest.



Let's take apart the carb and anything else I can pull off!



Removed the air box and air filter, cleaned out the fuel filter, removed and cleaned the carb bowl:







A bit of residue in the bowl:







Everything went back together, no parts left over.



Filled it up with fresh gas, pulled the choke, turned the key, and vroom, up it started.



I let it run for an hour, then shut it down.



What should I do this year, Seafoam, Stabil, or...?



... take Qwerty's advice (why is he always right?
).



"...drain the fuel systems and use fogging oil in the tank to prevent rust. There really are no other workable solutions for long term storage..."



I decided to drain the gas, run it dry, and drain the bit that was left in the carb bowl.



Then I'll fog the inside of the gas tank and see what happens.



Also, I removed the new Shorai battery and am taking it to NC to put in my TW.



I believe that the next time I need to start the generator, I'll put in the fresh gas and be able to start it with the rope.



jb
 

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Anything your going to store that has E-10 in it will need the fuel system drained. As you found out it turns to gunk even with Stabil.
 

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Try marine fuel. Go to a boat launch with a gas
can fill it up and use that for your generator. I've been told marine fuel has none of the bs that will gumm up the carb...still a good idea to drain fuel after use though.
 

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I'm always right because I've more experience. What that means is, if there is a way to screw something up, I've already figured out how to do that and devised a way to prevent that particular screw-up from happening again. Rest assured, I still find plenty of new thins to screw up. The increasingly complex idiocy that I can create is proof positive that evolution is real.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
... How hard is it to clean the jets?
Hi Muletanna,



Not hard to clean. There is also a sediment bowl located under the gas tank that has a filter that might need to be cleaned.



You will need to remove the air box to get to everything.



Here's the EU3000is Owner's Manual, p 45-50 is what you need:



http://www.poweredgenerators.com/honda/manuals/31ZT7605.pdf



Removing the carb bowl is just like Qwerty said: unscrew the bolt on the bottom of the bowl, then pull down on the bowl. There's an o-ring on the top edge of the bowl that you will need to keep track of.



You can access the main jet without removing it. I fed a guitar string up through the jet until I could see it in the carb throat.



I could have fed a bundle of 4 or 5 strings through the jet. It's a pretty large hole.



After you clean the sediment bowl and the carb bowl, and jet, put it all back together. It took me about an hour for the whole process.



Before you replace the air box:



put in fresh gas,

turn on the fuel knob on the main control panel,

spray some starting fluid, or carb cleaner, or WD40 in the carb throat

(the carb cleaner or WD40 works well as a starter fluid)

pull out the choke

turn on the key for electric start

or use the rope starter (key needs to be on)



It should start up. If not there may be a more serious problem.



jb
 

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Hi Muletanna,



Not hard to clean. There is also a sediment bowl located under the gas tank that has a filter that might need to be cleaned.



You will need to remove the air box to get to everything.



Here's the EU3000is Owner's Manual, p 45-50 is what you need:



http://www.poweredgenerators.com/honda/manuals/31ZT7605.pdf



Removing the carb bowl is just like Qwerty said: unscrew the bolt on the bottom of the bowl, then pull down on the bowl. There's an o-ring on the top edge of the bowl that you will need to keep track of.



You can access the main jet without removing it. I fed a guitar string up through the jet until I could see it in the carb throat.



I could have fed a bundle of 4 or 5 strings through the jet. It's a pretty large hole.



After you clean the sediment bowl and the carb bowl, and jet, put it all back together. It took me about an hour for the whole process.



Before you replace the air box:



put in fresh gas,

turn on the fuel knob on the main control panel,

spray some starting fluid, or carb cleaner, or WD40 in the carb throat

(the carb cleaner or WD40 works well as a starter fluid)

turn on the key for electric start

or use the rope starter (key needs to be on)



It should start up. If not there may be a more serious problem.



jb
Thanks for the reply Jb. I will give it a try myself before taking it to the shop. Do you think a bread tie wrapper will work to clean the jet?
 

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You can use guitar strings or I sometimes use copper wire from a piece of electric cable.

I recently had to do both carburetors on a ninja 500. It took quite a bit of cleaning to get all the varnish out, but it is working great.



I use SeaFoam on all of my bikes. My track R6 sits for long periods of time, with no license plate I can only use it at the track. All the other bikes I always keep the batteries full with battery tenders and take them for a short spin whenever weather gets above 40 degrees (like today, finally!!) I also keep them on bike stands to relieve pressure on the tire.



What would be the easiest way to Fog the track R6? Through the spark plugs?



Back on subject, great genset you have there. It is probably the best one in the market, it is definitely the quietest. I would love to get one for my RV. The only problem is that it cost more than a TW200
 

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Discussion Starter #9
... I would love to get one for my RV. The only problem is that it cost more than a TW200
Maybe Muletanna will sell his cheap.




For your RV the EU2000 would probably be a better choice if you don't have heavy electrical needs.



The 2000 is half the size and is a whole lot more portable than the 3000.



jb
 

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No need to fog the engine. Good thing, too, because to fog an engine one runs the engine out of gas and shoots fogging oil through the carb/throttle body just before the engine dies. that would be difficult to do 4 carbs/throttle bodies at the same time without help. Just pull the plugs, dump about a teaspoon of engine oil in each plug hole, bump the starter a few times, replace the plugs. Enough oil will remain to prevent rust of liner, rings, and valves. When readying the bike, do the same thing to put fresh oil on the rings and cylinder to prevent dry start damage.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
No need to fog the engine...
Are you right again? ...




We old time boaters (outboard, 2 cycle) have been fogging our engines through the spark plug holes for years...



The directions on my old, old can of fogging oil say to do both... through carb and spark plug hole.



Don't know if the new cans give directions:







jb
 

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2-strokes are different--they don't have a crankcase full of oil to keep the bottom end from rusting. On boat engines I pull the plugs, turn the engine to top dead center on a piston, then spray in the carb. With the piston at TDC the ports between the carb and crank are open. Then rotate the engine to bottom dead center on that piston, and fog through the spark plug hole, because the ports between the combustion chamber and crankcase are open.
 

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Back on subject, great genset you have there. It is probably the best one in the market, it is definitely the quietest. I would love to get one for my RV. The only problem is that it cost more than a TW200


[/quote]



Yamaha makes a 2800Ef model that is 1/2 the weight about the same dbs. and is much smaller and cheaper.
 

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It's always a good idea to have a generator handy. I have a 3,500 watt Kawasaki unit sleeping under my workbench. We use it for camping mostly but I also keep it ready to go if we need it at home or at work. We've used it three times at work in the past couple of years (I work on traffic signals). The last time it got pressed into service it ran an intersection (with street lighting) for ~25 hours. Generator was at half-load for about half of that time and seemed to be running at little more than a fast idle.



As far as maintenance on my generator goes I installed an hour meter to keep track of usage, I drain the carb bowl before putting it away, keep the gas tank filled and try to find a reason to run it once a month or so, even if it's just running a hedge trimmer or something in my backyard for thirty minutes or so it helps to keep it ready to go.



Down-the-road I'm thinking about installing a stand by generator in my backyard which can run most (if not all) of my whole house. These aren't real popular where I live so it's still something I'm looking into. I was in Houston a couple of days after Hurricane Ike blew-threw back in 2008 and saw first-hand how valuable having power was in those first few days/weeks after the storm.



Kevin
 

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If you have a generator when everyone else is sitting in the dark you better have it bolted down, chained, locked, surrounded by barbed wire, with a snarling Doberman sitting on it, or it will be gone in a heartbeat.



I have a $300 3.5kw Chinese generator from Northern Tool or some such place. When I need it I fill it with real gas, flip the switch, flip the choke, and pull the rope. Once. Always starts first pull. When I put it away, I drain the tank, run it until it starts to die, then flip the choke and let it suck the last drop it can, drain the float and petcock bowls, lightly fog the tank, and change the oil. It has sat up for over a year, and started on the first pull next time I needed it. It is much easier to find real gasoline and properly stow equipment than it is to get it running again after being improperly stowed.
 

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Good point about generator's walking away Qwerty, mine doesn't leave the garage without a thick lock and cable (could be removed but it would take some time). The first time I left it locked to a controller cabinet running an intersection I took a couple of pictures of it and E-mailed them to my boss. He later asked why I'd done that and I told him so I could prove that the generator had been there and was set-up, locked, etc. when I left the location and so that when I returned later if the generator wasn't there any longer he'd be able to see what he'd be replacing for me!




Another lesson I learned in Houston was gasoline (and diesel for that matter) were *very* hard to get in Houston for the first 4-5 days following the storm. It got so bad we were sending a couple of guys to the suburbs to fill gas cans so we'd have fuel (diesel) for our trucks and gas for our generators (which were running the RV's we we're staying-in). For that reason I keep my generator full and most of my bikes/quads have full tanks. I figured that I'd have about two days of gasoline between the bikes, more if I use fuel from my air-cooled VW (ten gallons). That's another thing I like about the built-in standby generator, most of the models I've looked at don't use gasoline, they use natural gas or propane. Again I'm still a long way from deciding whether that's the route I want to go but I like to be prepared; almost three years ago when some wildfires came near to our area and some of our friends were evacuated from their homes they came to ours, we jokingly began calling it the Red Cross shelter. It felt good to help folks out and my wife and I were glad to do it.



Kevin
 

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I'd be wary about piped-in fuel for emergency use. Pipelines often are compromised. My view is if it ain't on site, I'm easily screwed.



I have 5, 5-gallon gas cans I keep full of real gas. I use them for pressure washers, generator, and motorcycles. Once a week I dump one in the minivan and refill. That keeps all the fuel fresh without the need for additives.



All my survival food is dried or canned. Refrigeration is an expensive and wasteful luxury.



All my survival lighting is LED. All communications equipment features low current draw. All run on rechargable batteries I can charge off Tdub's AGM or the AGM in the minivan, both of which can be recharged from line voltage, generator, minivan alternator, alternator hooked to a staionary bike, or photovoltaics.



I have camp equipment and clothing suitable for sub-zero blizards, blazing hot deserts, and anything in between. I don't need heat or air conditing.



Cooking, water filtration, and climate control apparatus include solid fuel and solar power.



My generator is a tool, for convenience, not really part of my survival program, because a generator is not sustainable.



I feel in a SHTF scenario, a generator advertises "wealth" and attracts trouble. My goal is to blend in to the rubble and remain undetected, so trouble passes me by. If detected, I intend to appear more troubled than trouble, as if there is no gain in harrassing me.
 
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