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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Wondering how others are GPS-ing the TW.

This is the way I went (because it is cheep and easy, like the TW). It works well. Not water proof, but my tank bag has a clear area for it.

Garmin Nuvi 2455LMT: I already owned it, plus it gets free life time updates. Shows gravel / min maintenance roads well, no trails.

RAM handle bar mount: RAM Rail Base with Zinc Coated U-Bolt & 1" Ball for Rails from 0.5" to 1.25" in Diameter Unpackaged - RAM-B-231ZU | RAM Mounts

RAM Universal Phone / GPS mount: Search for RAM-HOL-PD3U - Page 1

RAM extension: RAM Double Socket Arm for 1" Balls (Overall Length: 3.69") Unpackaged - RAM-B-201U | RAM Mounts

RAM Ball (to mount on back of Universal phone / GPS mount): Search for RAP-B-238U - Page 1

12V power plug mounted to the front fairing to power it all up.


My Nuvi has a card slot. I need to figure out if it can accept .GPX maps and all that jazz.

Here is how it looks, how is yours:

 

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Garmin GPSMAP 64s Ram mount and 12 volt outlet.
I bought the BC trail maps and have found maps free online for Alaska, Utah and Oregon.
image.jpeg
Here on the Wee, I also have the TW and WR set up to use it.
 

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A 2009 TomTom model. (And a 2010 upgraded model) Which I DO NOT RECOMMEND. The logic on the two TomToms I have - both are, in brief, messed up.

They both give the option: "Fastest" "Shortest" "Stay off Freeways."

"Fastest"....INVARIABLY routes the user over the nearest interstate. No lie, this...on a two-mile journey with an interstate stretch close by, it will literally route the user to a cloverleaf, have him take a six-mile run to the next exit, and then drive back four miles. IDIOCY. Turns a two mile trip into a fifteen-mile circular ride.

"Shortest"...will take you over every paper street, back alley, fire road, that's in your way. Literally...it will have you getting off the freeway, onto the exit ramp, and back on...to save twenty feet. Not once but numerous times. Sadly, the way the map is presented on the screen, too close-up...unless you already know you're not to get off, you can make the mistake of following its prompts. If you're in an unfamiliar area and know you have to get off close by, it can sucker you that way, and it has.

And I've come close to throwing the things out the window for that reason.

But I have them and right now is not a good time for me to be buying stuff. They're okay in telling the user where he IS. They're a great AID to map use and trip planning.

But at least on those models in those years, the logic is totally screwed up.

I have one of them on the cycle, with a Ram ball-mount anchored to the handlebar. Power is on a cord strung along the gas tank with rubber clips glued to a seam, where trim meets tank (this, on the Wee-Strom) and then under the seat. I draw power from the battery-tender cord - I just bought a second quick-connect cord, and spliced it to a cigarette-lighter socket off an power-extension cord; and plugged in the TomTom lighter-jack plug. All under the seat, but the quick connect pokes out underneath. For quick DISconnect.

Except for the TomTom's messed-up logic, it all works well. I'll say this: Both of those old TomToms have been in pouring rain, and they've kept on working.
 

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I have been on the fence about the whole GPS thing for a couple of years now. I am not the most tech-oriented person, but I seem to be part of a shrinking minority of touring riders who does not have/use a dash-mounted GPS.

My research has led me to believe that the Garmin Montana is just about the best thing going, but as usual the "best" comes at a price!

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https://buy.garmin.com/en-US/US/prod523640.html

I'm think I'm pretty close to pulling the trigger...
 

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I find the small screens of hand-help mapping GPSs severely limit their usefulness. Sure they will show you where you are, but for planning purposes , like "Where does this road go?" by the time one scrolls out to try to see the big picture the road of interest usually disappears from the displayed data. My Garmin Oregon gathers dust as a result. A small GPS-chipped tablet can show a lot more for a lot less money.
 

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I would like to have a dedicated GPS but haven't felt I ride areas where one is needed so haven't spent the $$ yet. I have Motion X-GPS downloaded on my IPhone 5c, with a generic phone holder on the handle bars. Actually I think it is a mountain bike phone holder, but it's working well so far. I still need a USB charger because the GPS does kill the battery fairly fast.

The Motion X was only a few dollars to download. There is a long thread on advrider with lots of info. It does a lot of stuff, but biggest thing is unlike most cell phone maps, it DOES NOT need a cell phone signal for the GPS to work. It can run on just the GPS signal, but will use cell signal for better accuracy if availability. Shows lots of small trails. You can load maps to the phones internal storage. There is an option to zoom in on an area to get more detail, but this has to be done ahead of time and uses more space, but can be deleted later. It records tracks, stores waypoints, you can enter co-ords, and can be set up to send location updates if you have a cell signal.
I usually don't have it on while riding due to batt life and no charger. I will stop and check trail names, see where the trail goes, and mark places so I can get back. I am definitely not an expert or GPS techie so I recommend doing the research before you rely only on it as your GPS. Start with the thread on ADVrider. I do remember there being two different Motion X apps. One was more street oriented so make sure it's the right one.
 

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RE: How do you GPS?

Grease pencil, laminated maps, strip maps, roll chart and trip odometer.

Yah I need a GPS. Somehow something higher priority always comes along to trump that purchase.
 

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I have been on the fence about the whole GPS thing for a couple of years now. I am not the most tech-oriented person, but I seem to be part of a shrinking minority of touring riders who does not have/use a dash-mounted GPS.

My research has led me to believe that the Garmin Montana is just about the best thing going, but as usual the "best" comes at a price!

View attachment 30668
https://buy.garmin.com/en-US/US/prod523640.html

I'm think I'm pretty close to pulling the trigger...

I have a Montana 600 and love it. Probably one of the most versatile units on the market. I use it hunting, fishing, driving and riding.
 

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Thats interesting, who makes one that your familiar with? I didn't know any other than maybe Apple did.


I find the small screens of hand-help mapping GPSs severely limit their usefulness. Sure they will show you where you are, but for planning purposes , like "Where does this road go?" by the time one scrolls out to try to see the big picture the road of interest usually disappears from the displayed data. My Garmin Oregon gathers dust as a result. A small GPS-chipped tablet can show a lot more for a lot less money.
 

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Thanks, I appreciate you taking the time.
I currently run two, I have a garmin on the right for roads and I have a delorme on the left for topo' and map layering but the software sucks, it gets the job done but takes to long. It is tied into my emergeancy satellite transponder so that's good. I don't have a pic of it now because it's in the house hooked to the laptop but here's the garmin on the right ball mount. Kinda dark in the shop now but here's the pic.
image.jpeg


What's the best cheap tablet for GPS use? | Technology | The Guardian

Tablets With GPS - Amazon.com‎

Or use a faster dedicated receiver like Garmin GLO ($99) to hand off data for viewing on a non-gps, or weak gps enabled tablet, iPad, large screen smart phone( samsung) or perhaps most commonly a Samsung tablet.

I assume one is looking for a platform that displays TW-friendly trails and non-city street data beyond what one gets with a simple TomTom device.
 

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but for planning purposes , like "Where does this road go?" by the time one scrolls out to try to see the big picture the road of interest usually disappears from the displayed data.
I don't want to know where the road goes, I'll drive it and find out!:D
 

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I bought the Garmin Montana 600T and the Ram powered bar mount last year. Love this combo because it has the larger screen that I can see, is water proof and can do both the topo maps as well as the highway maps. Too bad I am technically challenged and don't know how to use most of the functions this advanced unit has. I have not spent much time playing with it but it is simple enough to get back from where ever I go using the track back feature. Pre planning a particular route through the woods is not so easy for me and pairing the unit to my computer is even more of a challenge. A gadget guy techno-geek would absolutely love the Montana.

GaryL
 

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I have a Trail Tech Vapor on the TW
Plus, There is a RAM mount for my Note 4 that runs either My Tracks or Maps. Most all of the "rider" bikes have RAM balls for my phone or gimbaled coffee cup holder. The "rider" PC800 has 2 balls.
The HD Ultra has Harley's built in GPS that really is nice after the short learning curve.

The Trail Tech has a breadcrumb kind of function. I have only used it twice in the Pine Barrens to keep from getting lost and eaten by the locals.

I really do not get out that much. Boo, Al.
 

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Although it’s in my nature to “embrace” new technology, I also have a habit of first trying to “justify” it.

My mobile phone is a flip top: This means it cannot be activated by mistake. I paid nearly 13 bucks for it on Ebay (new) - it can not only receive calls, it can also make calls – job done as far as I’m concerned. When I want to go around with my head stuck in the phone all day, I’ll buy a smart phone – (but don’t hold your breath).

Same thing with “tablets” – I’ve got a laptop – why on earth would I need something just as portable, but less capable ?

But in the car, I use sat nav, so much easier when your destination is 400 miles away and you’re on your own. A couple of paper maps in the boot (just in case), but the sat nav is better than having your head stuck in a map while you drive up someone’s arse.

Now, just as you can “train” someone to rely on a sat nav, you can also train them out of it – especially my generation who has experiences on both sides of the fence. I’ve been wanting sat nav for the TW for a while, but I just can’t “justify” spending that much money on a unit that will tell me where to go, when my entire range on Anglesey is only 25 X 25 miles. I can accept that many of you will have differing requirements, but for me the TW is about “exploring”, not “arriving” at a given destination within a time frame – I’ve got the car for that.

The whole thing about “exploring” is to think “I wonder what’s down there” – whereas the whole deal with sat navs is to tell you where to go by entering your pre-determined destination.

It seems like a conflict of interests to me – all I need to know on the TW is “roughly” where I am – and then I can choose to either re-aim for the target, or continue on something else I’ve discovered that’s more interesting – the “target” can wait for another day.

To this end, I have invested in one of these – 300 bucks cheaper, probably more accurate (and a lot more reliable) – and something that will let you discover 300 more places you’d never have seen without it …….

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