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Discussion Starter #1
On rear tire pressure, that is.

I'm loving my little TDub, but one kinda glaring deficiency is the lack of rear suspension compliance.

I don't expect the same kind of ride I got on my KTM with WP units or from the Ohlins on my BMW. Still, even relatively small road imperfections can be pretty jarring at 18 psi.

I know its been mentioned that a lot of the suspension compliance on the TDub comes from the fat rear tire. It's been mentioned that for off-road, 14 rear combined with 12 front is doable.

How low is it wise to go at the rear for what is, right now, 95% road use? Do things get noticeably squirrelly on the road below a certain pressure? Talking stock rear for now.

Thanks in advance.
 

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I found the stock rear tire and the Shinko 241 on front squirrely on any road surface no matter what pressure I played with. I ended up putting 203/204 Bridgestones on and really have a good road feel now at 18 psi front and rear.
 

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How low is it wise to go at the rear for what is, right now, 95% road use?
At 95% road use I would air only for the road. I run 30 psi in my front Heidenau and 24 or so more in the rear. If I go off road I don't mess with the air pressure. Off road for me is about 1% or the time.
 

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I run near stock pressures on road (18psi R and 21psi F), but off-road the stock tire pressure is miserably too firm. I use 12 psi front and rear off-road. Haven't spun a tire on the rim yet. And I ride a bit too slow off road to pinch flat, so far (knocks on wood).
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks, guys.

I just dropped the pressure from 18 to 16 psi and I'll see if that helps at all.

I did do one ride at 12 front /14 rear, and the ride to the trails felt fine at that low setting.

Something like an Ohlins on the back might be "gilding the lilly", but might be worth it to take care of what I see as a major deficiency. Does anyone sell an aftermarket rear shock for the TDub?
 

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I'm not aware of any direct fit replacement shocks. I've read quite a bit on here of folks using a shock from the Blaster ATVs but if I recall they required fitment modification (custom made shims?).
 

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Wow elime, that's a lot of pressure in those tires. Do you ride on smooth roads? How jarring are potholes? How do you like those tires you're running on?
 

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Stock rear gets rather squirrelly around 6psi and is useful for very slow, very soft conditions, 8psi to 10 psi is better for mud and snow with still some speed stability. Usually run 12 psi front and rear for summery road and dirt.
 

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Wow elime, that's a lot of pressure in those tires. Do you ride on smooth roads? How jarring are potholes? How do you like those tires you're running on?
The Heidenau is pretty good. Not very aggressive tread but it will hold on wet asphalt unlike the stock tires which slip and slide. So far I have 12,000 or 13,000 miles on it and expect to get another 10K miles. The rear is a stock tire so nothing new there.

People bitch about the roads but actually they are pretty good.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I just took a look at how the rear shock on my late-2017 TDub is set up.





It appears to be a modified "ramp" setup, with one softer position available. It looks to me like the shock would have to come off and the spring compressed to make a change. I weigh about 185 and bouncing up and down on the bike feels like it's "oversprung" to me.

Am I on the right path?
 

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Yes..
I just took a look at how the rear shock on my late-2017 TDub is set up.





It appears to be a modified "ramp" setup, with one softer position available. It looks to me like the shock would have to come off and the spring compressed to make a change. I weigh about 185 and bouncing up and down on the bike feels like it's "oversprung" to me.

Am I on the right path?
 

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Lots of folks have used them. I went with the red one cuz I'm faaaat. :D They are nice and make a difference. Their front spring set is awesome too! If you want to experiment beforehand, the stock shock is adjustable a little bit. There are 3 settings, it is probably in the middle now from the factory. You can go one step softer and one step stiffer. If that isn't enough, you can also make a 3/8ths or 1/2 inch spacer to put under it. ;)
Anyone have experience using a Pro Cycle spring with our stock shock?

https://procycle.us/bikepages/tw200.html#suspension

 

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Thanks LT...that's about what I expected/wanted to hear!

I'm right at the cross-over point between the white & red springs, so I think I will go with the lighter/white spring and play with the 3 little pre-load ring-clips.
Can the shock oil be changed on these stockers? That would be a big plus! Any idea what weight oil the stockers come with?

Ohlins or the like would be great except for the $$$ and the fact these are not racing or hi-performance bikes anyway. Too bright a lipstick on a pig!
My sport/touring bike has Ollies on both ends! (Below). I am a devout believer!

Also, think I'm going to go with the Pro Cycle TW200 Fork Solution Kit, with their springs & the wonderful Emulator kit. I've used these before and they are tizz!
Also looking at using Ohlins for springs instead of the Pro Cycle ones. I had the Emulator/Ohline spring combo in my 650 KLR and loved it. It may depend on price!

I'm not going to race it but I don't want to slow down either, or to bust my skinny 73 year old arse one more time!
Just looking for the right combo.

 

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My bike felt like a little kids rocking horse front and back before I did the springs, then and only then, did it feel like a real motorcycle. No, oil can't be changed in the stock shock. You have more experience with the Emulators than I do. I didn't get them, but am very happy with the springs alone. Keep us posted brother!! :)
Thanks LT...that's about what I expected/wanted to hear!

I'm right at the cross-over point between the white & red springs, so I think I will go with the lighter/white spring and play with the 3 little pre-load ring-clips.
Can the shock oil be changed on these stockers? That would be a big plus! Any idea what weight oil the stockers come with?

Ohlins or the like would be great except for the $$$ and the fact these are not racing or hi-performance bikes anyway. Too bright a lipstick on a pig!
My sport/touring bike has Ollies on both ends! (Below). I am a devout believer!

Also, think I'm going to go with the Pro Cycle TW200 Fork Solution Kit, with their springs & the wonderful Emulator kit. I've used these before and they are tizz!
Also looking at using Ohlins for springs instead of the Pro Cycle ones. I had the Emulator/Ohline spring combo in my 650 KLR and loved it. It may depend on price!

I'm not going to race it but I don't want to slow down either, or to bust my skinny 73 year old arse one more time!
Just looking for the right combo.

 

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Well, guess that solves the issue of what is lowest recommended tire pressure for a TrailWing rear tire on a Yamaha TW200.:p
 
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