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Discussion Starter #1
Ok all, I have a serious question... I commute 11 miles each way to work at 55+mph every day (weather permitting). I also venture off on the weekends traveling the same speeds and frequently drive 196 miles to vacation in Southern Ohio in the summer averaging 55 mph and sometimes hitting 70+ mph on my Dub.

I currently weigh in at 165 lbs and usually drop down to 155 in the summer due to more activity. I know our bikes were probably not designed for 55+ mph as often as I'm hitting those numbers?!

So, my question is... Am I damaging or over stressing my dub? I'd really hate to see this bikes life span decrease or prematurely end. It's a 2015 that I put over 1100 miles on in less than 3 months. Would I better off trading it in for a WR250R due to the speeds I travel or will this mule handle the abuse? Any input would be much appreciated; I'd really hate to see her go!

BTW I do all the proper maintenance and she's well taken care of outside of traveling 55 +
 

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Hey Yamahauln, I'm 250 & I commuted by freeway for several years and my TW is still going strong. In addition to my weight, I have front & rear cycle racks, front panniers & an auxiliary fuel tank and I carry a loaded backpack. As Twilight pointed out, I re-geared my TW for the freeway and I highly recommend it unless you need the stock "granny low." Although, now that I no longer commute by freeway I have stock sprockets in inventory for the next chain replacement.
 

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If you got the money buy the WR250 if your primary use is the pavement with just light duty off-road. You will be able to travel in the 65-75 mph range better. Maybe even consider an XT250 instead of a WR250 to save a little money with a little better speed than the TW.

If you really like the TW and don't really want to get rid of it...
The TW can handle what you're asking for it right now as well. This summer I tried a 45 tooth rear sprocket. I absolutely loved it when riding on the highway. Much lower rpm's made the vibration ride much more comfortable. Though I didn't check it as much, I believe my fuel mileage was better as well. I also took it off-highway on a forest service road above Boise (Boise Ridge Road). There were some pretty steep sections and I had to downshift to 1st gear, but it did just fine. Obviously, a 45T wouldn't be a good trail gear if you have to go slow.

As TWilight mentioned, a 47T would be going in the same direction as the 45T with just a few more rpm's than the 45T.

If I rode a TW mostly on highway, I would use a 14/45 gearing combo or equivalent as there are other sprocket combination ratio's you could go with.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Awesome! I'm extremely glad to hear these bikes can handle the load, I'll be sure to change the rear sprocket out when the weather starts to sustain decent temperatures. I really, really like these bikes and it'a paid off, so I really didn't want to go back in debt for another bike!

Honestly I know I'd miss the Dub as soon as I handed over the keys. What this bike lacks in power it makes up in personality!
 

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Given that the TW motor is air-cooled, the best things you can do for its longevity are synthetic oil and frequent oil changes. Other than that, don't worry about it. :)

And TWilight's sprocket suggestion is worth considering too.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I've been changing the oil every 500 miles (Yamalube). I've noticed since I've been riding Yamaha's (16 or 17 years now) the clutch plates always stick once the bike sets awhile. Does synthetic oil prevent this? It's annoying to say the least!
 

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I was in the same boat, either TW or wr250R. I will be commuting 12 miles each way to work and home, plus will be using it for hunting and trails. The WR is awesome but sits so high, when I am hunting with a pack on and gear, I like to be flat footed on the ground when I stop.
 

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I've been changing the oil every 500 miles (Yamalube). I've noticed since I've been riding Yamaha's (16 or 17 years now) the clutch plates always stick once the bike sets awhile. Does synthetic oil prevent this? It's annoying to say the least!
Synthetic or semi can help - but the effects (of the oil change) diminish over time - mine came back from the shop a while back with semi, and it was noticeably better - but over time the plates are sticky again, maybe not as much, but give it a couple of months ......
 

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Discussion Starter #9
The WR is a sexy machine but it does have a rather tall stance. I also like to be flat footed when coming to a stop or riding on rough terrain that calls for some footwork. I'm 6ft but my weight doesn't suppress the springs to the point I feel confident. I really want to keep the Dub I just don't want to wring it out to the point something catastrophic happens. Id rather make a small monthly payment than to be stranded on the side of the road. However, from the sounds of it this mighty mule can take the abuse.
 

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I've been changing the oil every 500 miles (Yamalube). I've noticed since I've been riding Yamaha's (16 or 17 years now) the clutch plates always stick once the bike sets awhile. Does synthetic oil prevent this? It's annoying to say the least!
mine started sticking when I started to use full synthetic. it's no big deal to just break them loose before the first ride. the benefits of using synthetic far out way the sticky clutch plates
 

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..... However, from the sounds of it this mighty mule can take the abuse.
What you describe isn't abuse, as long as it doesn't get too hot. There are guys who have put 30,000+ highway miles on these bikes, mostly with a 14/47 or 14/45 setup. That would be about the mileage where a top end rebuild might be necessary. Heat is the enemy, not so much sustained high RPMs. Hell, I go 60-65 on the slab with a 13/50 setup!

I haven't had sticky clutch problems since I started using Mobil 1 Racing 4T 10w40 at 2,000 miles. I use 2,000 mile intervals unless putting it away for the winter....it gets fresh oil for that regardless of mileage. But I ride pretty gently, so if I rode it hard all the time I would use 1,000 or even 500 mile intervals.
 

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Look for someone parting a post 2000 TW out and buy the engine as a back up. Build it yourself so you will know your bike best. You'll probably have less than seven or eight hundred bucks in the engine, and the peace of mind knowing your set. I dunno, just thinkin' out loud. lol
 

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I recommend you add the oil cooler that one of our forum member has to offer as I'm doing this Spring. I've purchased it but haven't had time this Winter to get it on. Too lazy I suppose. I think that sprocket change to 45 rear tooth and an oil cooler and perhaps synthetic oil and you're good. I'd ride it and be happy. No other bike looks or rides like a T-Dub. None.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I'm for sure going to try another oil next change and yes I can say this bike has ever been abused rather than sustaining high revs. The wind use to really whip me around but the Dub and I came to an understanding, once I relaxed and let the bike take control of it's self gusts of wind both natural and gusts created by passing semi's no longer effect the bike. It's done everything I've ask it to and that's why I don't want to part with it unless I'm seriously hurting it by sustaining long hauls well above 55. I guess that red line by 55 is what got me worried, I'm taking that means I'm at red line correct?
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Who makes the oil cooler?

I recommend you add the oil cooler that one of our forum member has to offer as I'm doing this Spring. I've purchased it but haven't had time this Winter to get it on. Too lazy I suppose. I think that sprocket change to 45 rear tooth and an oil cooler and perhaps synthetic oil and you're good. I'd ride it and be happy. No other bike looks or rides like a T-Dub. None.
 

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I recommend you add the oil cooler that one of our forum member has to offer as I'm doing this Spring. I've purchased it but haven't had time this Winter to get it on. Too lazy I suppose. I think that sprocket change to 45 rear tooth and an oil cooler and perhaps synthetic oil and you're good. I'd ride it and be happy. No other bike looks or rides like a T-Dub. None.
 

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Just my opinion here but a stock TW will ride along at 55 MPH all day long and never feel abused. The 70+ MPH you state is pushing it too far if it actually even will go 70+. I have a small tach on mine and don't remember the exact RPMs at 55 but it is well below the red line of our engines and nothing to even be concerned about. My TW feels perfectly comfortable cruising along at 50 -55 MPH and still OK at 65 for short 1-2 miles stretches. There are very few days in Ohio and here in NY where the need for an oil cooler actually exists. 95 degrees and stuck in slow moving bumper to bumper traffic would be the place for the cooler. Going to a 47 rear sprocket will be beneficial for the road but you lose in the bottom end when you get off the road in the thick stuff and put an undue strain on the clutch plates. I would not change a thing other than staying away from that 70+ MPH mark. Mine will do it but I have to be going down hill and tucked down and the aerodynamics of the bike itself are not good at that speed. If you took a ride on my XT225 with 6th gear you would want to trade your TW.

GaryL
 

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I'm for sure going to try another oil next change and yes I can say this bike has ever been abused rather than sustaining high revs. The wind use to really whip me around but the Dub and I came to an understanding, once I relaxed and let the bike take control of it's self gusts of wind both natural and gusts created by passing semi's no longer effect the bike. It's done everything I've ask it to and that's why I don't want to part with it unless I'm seriously hurting it by sustaining long hauls well above 55. I guess that red line by 55 is what got me worried, I'm taking that means I'm at red line correct?
Not correct. Just a visual indicator of the average maximum speed limit. I thought the same thing when I got mine:D


Tom
 

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.... I guess that red line by 55 is what got me worried, I'm taking that means I'm at red line correct?
No. Go here: Gearing Commander: Motorcycle Speed and Drive Train Calculator (Online and Stand alone)

Look up the TW in the database, plug in the standard gearing and any other ratio you like, and fool around with it some. If you change the minimum RPM box you can get different RPM/speed numbers in those boxes. The RPM redline is 9,500 and anything up to around 8,500 is a reasonable cruising RPM. Keep in mind this is actual speed, not what the speedometer says. A GPS or a radar trailer will give you actual speed. My speedo is 5 mph fast at 60, so even with 13/50 gearing I'm not getting anywhere near redline until the speedo reads 73 mph!

Just as a quick data point, with 14/47 gearing you would not reach 9,500 RPM until 78 mph actual, or probably about 84 on the speedo. Of course this is with stock tires, anything else requires some compensatory arithmetic.:cool:
 

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+1 on the Gearing Commander.
There are others too, some a little different...Google is your friend!
 
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