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Discussion Starter #1
As you can see from this image, the head snapped off that bolt. How screwed am I? Is this going to be a super expensive fix? Can I ride the bike to my shop or will I need to get it towed?
 

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Back the threads out with a knife and get a replacement at a hardware store. Get a washer also if you lost the original.
 

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If it’s not leaking bad you can ride it to the shop but keep an eye on it for a gusher. I believe you need part #3 from this photo. If it were me, I would try to notch it enough to get a standard screwdriver on it and back it out. Sorry I can’t give you the specs on the screw. Maybe someone has them. If you can get the rest out, take both pieces to the the hardware store and they can help you figure out a suitable replacement. Cheers and good luck.
 

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As you can see from this image, the head snapped off that bolt. How screwed am I? Is this going to be a super expensive fix? Can I ride the bike to my shop or will I need to get it towed?
Here are my suggestions:

-With the engine running, does oil leak out (i.e., gush, spray, ooze or nothing)? If if doesn't leak significantly, you should be okay to ride it as long as you keep an eye on it and your oil level.

-If it is only leaking a tiny bit, you could try to clean the threads well and seal the opening with some high-temperature silicone sealant as a temporary fix.

-I've heard that you can get reverse-twist drill bits that can be used to remove broken bolts like this one. A standard twist bit may just drive it in further/tighter.

-If you are able to get a small hole started, clean it out well, and try epoxy-ing the long end of a small allen wrench onto the broken end of the bolt. After it cures see if you can gently unscrew the broken piece.

-If you have access to a gas MIG welder, you could see if you could tack weld the long end of a small allen wrench onto the broken end of the bolt.

That's all I've got.
 

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Get a flat-blade screwdriver that's quite narrow/knife-like on the end, that is just wide enough to cross the diameter of the hole. Then get a hammer and tap away at it (making sure the blade stays on the same spot of the broken bolt-head) until a chiseled groove starts to farm. Get enough of a groove and you have yourself a fancy flat-head screw that can be removed (maybe) lol. Depending on what the break looks like, you may want to flatten out the "head" surface of the broken bolt first. It's worked for me at least a couple of times in the past. Good luck.
 
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Plan a long ride. Invest in expensive non-refundable reservations. Don’t bring any tools, spare oil, spare parts or a cell phone.
It’s sure to fall out somewhere during the trip.
 

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First you need a very sharp pointed punch so you can make a mark in the middle of the broken stud for a drill bit to drill into. Start with a new and very small drill bit. Increase the size of the hole with larger drill bits. Get a good quality EZ out drill bit that fits the hole you drilled into it. EZ outs are very sharp reverse bits that lock into the hole in the stud and should walk the stud backwards and out. Be very careful to not screw up the threads in the head while drilling. Once you get the broken stud out buy the exact replacement bolt as shown above and do not cinch it down so tight that it brakes.

GaryL
 

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I've used a dremel cut off wheel to notch them if their not too deep. In this case I'd go with an EZ out. Good lighting and even magnification is a big help.

If the threads do get damaged you may be able to drill it out and tap it to up size the bolt?
 

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Discussion Starter #12
So, it's pretty deep in there so I don't think I can dremmel a notch into it. And based on the angle, using a hammer is kind of out of the question.

Is it possible for me to simply fill the hole with an epoxy or silicone? based on what the inside looks like, is it possible for the end of the bolt to fall deeper in and damage something?
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Here are my suggestions:
-If it is only leaking a tiny bit, you could try to clean the threads well and seal the opening with some high-temperature silicone sealant as a temporary fix.
Is it possible for the end of the screw to like, fall into the engine or something?
 

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Maybe if you can get the carb out of the way you can get at it with a center punch, drill, and an EZ out. Make sure not to drill to deep or you'll likely get shavings in the engine. Mark the depth on a drill bit. I'd feel better removing it from the bike to work on it myself.

I'd be worried about the bolt falling in too....maybe someone else can confirm the risk on this.
 

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Maybe if you can get the carb out of the way you can get at it with a center punch, drill, and an EZ out. Make sure not to drill to deep or you'll likely get shavings in the engine. Mark the depth on a drill bit. I'd feel better removing it from the bike to work on it myself.

I'd be worried about the bolt falling in too....maybe someone else can confirm the risk on this.
Piggybacking off Trail Woman's suggestion.

They have reverse drill bits in some easy out kits. I've actually got a bolt like your's removed during the drilling. Drill bit got a good bite on the bolt and it backed right out without having to use the extractor.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
So, after a lot of swearing, scratches, and hurt fingers I was able to get it out with the screwdriver and hammer method. I had to use pliers to turn the screwdriver, but it eventually worked. Ordered the replacement screw online. Thanks for the suggestions everyone.
Though I am curious, what is the purpose of that bolt?
 

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It is the upper head bleeder bolt. After an oil change and as soon as you start the engine you should crack that bolt open about a half to three quarters turn and you should see oil seep out telling you the oil is flowing to the head.

GaryL
 
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This has happened so many times to people that I never test for oil flow anymore. I just re-use the original filter over and over indefinitely. The oil filter cover bolts are also very subject to over torquing and snapping or stretching. I use a figure of 75 inch pounds instead of the 87 called for in the specs.
 

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what is the purpose of that bolt
So, after a lot of swearing, scratches, and hurt fingers I was able to get it out with the screwdriver and hammer method. I had to use pliers to turn the screwdriver, but it eventually worked. Ordered the replacement screw online. Thanks for the suggestions everyone.
Though I am curious, what is the purpose of that bolt?


Supposedly the oil can get "air locked" and not circulate as it should. I used the clear plastic hose method to check for oil flow in the head as GaryL mentions. Big warning though, even though you broke this bold Talon125, you want to make sure it's torqued properly after the bleed check. I didn't check mine and the bolt fell out, I lost all my oil and ruined the engine. Lessons learned for sure. However, I've also heard of people ruining the top end of their engine because they didn't check the oil flow after an oil change. I don't know if this is true but I ain't taking any chances.

a i

I use a plastic water drip adapter with the clear plastic hose. Start the engine and watch for the oil to flow into the tube. Once I see it I kill the engine and let the oil drain back in. Then replace the oil galley bleeder bolt.
 
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