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Rear panel on 2004 no longer has its sheen/shine above the tail pipe, bike was dropped in the dirt. I tried to revive it by using some polishing product, but didn't make a difference. It's supposed to be made of PVC plastic according to the research I've done. Someone suggested using steel wool. Anyone tried this or another method to brighten up their white plastics?



Also, one of the tabs is almost broken on the same tail piece, just hanging off of it. I've heard that nail glue is supposed to work. Another suggestion was PVC glue. I have some crazy glue, but haven't seen it suggested for use for PVC plastic. Any ideas for repair?
 

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Update: My friend picked up a product called Loctite Plastic Bonder for me (saw it recommended on another site). I will test it out tomorrow and report back with the results. I think it'll be perfect for the tab repair.



Still looking for ideas on shining up the white plastic tail piece
.
 

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A quick googlin shows suggestions ranging from soaking in a bleach solution to wetsanding or scrubbing with comet and a scotchbrite. You will have to see what works, maybe starting with small patches to see effectiveness (I sound like a cleaning chemical label)



If the plastic and bleach make a deadly chemical that cause birth defects, death, or other undue harm, please do not sue me
 

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A skidooing trick for a cracked windshield is to drill a series of hole along both sides of the crack and then lace the holes up with heavy fishing line just like a shoe is laced up. Then coat the entire area with RTV silicon sealer. Work the rtv through the holes and coat both sides.

Does not become invisible but usually keeps the plastic together for a long time.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
A quick googlin shows suggestions ranging from soaking in a bleach solution to wetsanding or scrubbing with comet and a scotchbrite. You will have to see what works, maybe starting with small patches to see effectiveness (I sound like a cleaning chemical label)



If the plastic and bleach make a deadly chemical that cause birth defects, death, or other undue harm, please do not sue me


I may try a lighter rubbing compound first. If that doesn't work, I'll try wet sanding it next. Trying to rejet the carb now, so plastic shining/repair has taken a back seat. Thanks for the suggestions.
 

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The problem with most plastics is that the original surface shine is due to the molding process. It is a thin layer that is melted smooth by the heat. Once that layer is gone, getting the underlying material to stay as shiny is very difficult. You might want to think about just painting everything to match or using vinyl covering.
 

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The problem with most plastics is that the original surface shine is due to the molding process. It is a thin layer that is melted smooth by the heat. Once that layer is gone, getting the underlying material to stay as shiny is very difficult. You might want to think about just painting everything to match or using vinyl covering.
based upon the comments above ............ one tip we use here in the UK to return faded black bumpers ( fenders ?) back to black is to use an electric heat gun used fror stripping paint from wood. Maybe someone could try running some hot air over the surface of your plastics, melting it just enough to bring back the shine ........ and report the findings here ? Regards David
 

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based upon the comments above ............ one tip we use here in the UK to return faded black bumpers ( fenders ?) back to black is to use an electric heat gun used fror stripping paint from wood. Maybe someone could try running some hot air over the surface of your plastics, melting it just enough to bring back the shine ........ and report the findings here ? Regards David


Very tricky. Heat just enough to melt the surface without burning or running. Then let cool. It will be more of an art form than a mechanics technique.
 

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this is what i do and it works everytime. if the scrathes are like the ones you get from riding down tight trails with bushes and twigs rubbing the plastic you should be able to start with 800 grit sand paper and work your way up to 1200 grit. after your done with 1200 grit the plastic surface should be very smooth. after sanding use a damp lint free cloth to clean all dust from surface. now here is the tricky part, you might have to find a tool rental store cause you will need to get an industrial strength heat gun. just like a blow dryer but much much hotter. just keep going over the surface of the plastic until you get a slight shine. WARNING WARNING WARNING never keep the heat gun in one spot always keep it moving and try to stay at least ten inches away from the plastic.ive found that if you take the time to get the surface as smooth as possible with 1200 grit the heat gun will melt the surface just fine. it wont be as if it was brand new but it looks better.this is one of my many winter bike projects.
 

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The sanding/heat gun method works decently well. If you want it to look even more shiney after heating it, apply a liquid acrylic product (like Mop & Glow or similar) and it will shine like new. Make sure the plastic is SUPER CLEAN before applying the acrylic since any dust/dirt will be there forever. Acrylic works will on dull paint too.
 

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Don't know if anyone on the forum has tried this on cracked or broken plastics, but on my ATVs I've made repairs to plastics by using a soldering iron to melt two broken pieces back together, then sanded them to make it look better. Never fussed over making it perfect but it usually held well and was free vs. buying expensive new plastics. I've seen kits sold as well that come with strips of plastic to melt and make repairs with but I've never tried these, has anyone else?
 

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I use a one-step kitchen floor wax. Mop and Glow I think it's called. It brings back that shiny new look. You can do 3 or 4 coats before you have to strip it off and start again. To strip, use ammonia water solution.

I've used this trick for decades and my bikes always look brand new. Lately, I've been using a product called ZAP! on my RV. Makes a 20 year old RV look like new!! It's a milky clear liquid like the Mop And Glow, but holds up to being outdoors for years.
 
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