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Discussion Starter #1
G'day.



In a few years, me and my partner want to have a month or two riding through the states
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We were hoping we could buy a bike in the states, then ride it around for a few months. Renting is very dear, as is bringing our own bike.



As far as I know, I won't be able to 'own' a bike as I'm not a resident. So, I was thinking if I could 'borrow' one off a friend for the duration of the trip.



'Borrow' may mean get a friend to purchase a bike and register it in their name with our money.



Can you guys see any problems in my perceived plan?



Thanks in advance.



Rob & Kath.
 

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Only problem would be someone wanting to take a risk in having it in their name for insurance reasons, or if you decided to go down a tollway without paying and racking up tickets and fines. The world is a different place now where one cannot be trusted with just a hand shake and their word.
 

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Rob, I'm not sure where you got the idea you couldn't own something if you are not a resident. I've known Brits, and other international visitors that owned vehicles in the US even tho they were here on 6 month visas. Yes it becomes a bit of a quagmire in purchase of insurance when you have to show you have a US address, or someone insists you have a US license rather than a foreign license with international supplement, but it can be done. As I recall my British friends had a problem getting insurance for longer than the term of their visa (this might not be a problem if its a buy it, ride it, and sell it in a single trip (as opposed to them who wanted to leave the rig at a son's house and come back 6 months later. You should be able to work it out, but I'm sure others with experience can add info. Let me know if you want contact points for others with experiences, or insurance agencies, etc. 911 has messed up the regs for many otherwise simple tasks, but occasionally common sense prevails but only in the face of persistence. tom
 

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A Brit I met at Daytona Bike Week 2001 made arrangements on our V-Max club forum to buy a used one from a member. He rode around in the United States, stayed with other members and even went on a group ride with our Houston Chapter in the Texas Hill Country. Then sold it back to the original owner. He had a great trip. Cheers.
 

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Maybe pick up a copy of this book











http://www.google.co...ved=0CGAQ8wIwAA





Motorcyclist's Legal Handbook (USA)





By Pat Hahn - MBI Publishing Company (2012) - Paperback - 240 pages - ISBN 0760340234 Motorcyclists face legal challenges that non-motorcyclists don’t even consider. Unfortunately, many motorcyclists are ignorant of those challenges as well—until they find themselves in legal trouble. In addition to all the physical hazards of the road, motorcyclists must negotiate a seemingly endless array of legal hazards, from the myriad licensing requirements and restrictions that vary from state to state to the issue of anti-motorcycle bias among law enforcement officials. While motorcycle magazines frequently publish articles addressing various aspects of the legal issues with which a rider must contend, there has never been a one-stop source that contains all of this information until now. Motorcyclist’s Legal Handbook collects all the information a rider needs to know in one comprehensive volume.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks, gents.



Tom, if that's the case, that makes it easy. I only plan on riding around for a few months and then I intend to re-sell it and accept my losses. I'm still confident the losses will be far less than hiring.



Regarding insurance, what types do you have?



We have injury to people (mandatory); damage to other people's vehicles and your own is optional.



Thanks, Rob.
 

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Thanks, gents.



Tom, if that's the case, that makes it easy. I only plan on riding around for a few months and then I intend to re-sell it and accept my losses. I'm still confident the losses will be far less than hiring.



Regarding insurance, what types do you have?



We have injury to people (mandatory); damage to other people's vehicles and your own is optional.



Thanks, Rob.




Depends on what state you are in. Washington does not require any kind of motorcycle insurance.
 

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20,000,000 illegal aliens have no problem owning vehicles in the U. S. of A. You do not have to be a citizen or resident. Contact some of your fellow countrypersons already in the U. S. of A. for details on how to ride legally, or ride illegally. Worse they'll do to you for riding illegal is write you a citation.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
20,000,000 illegal aliens have no problem owning vehicles in the U. S. of A. You do not have to be a citizen or resident. Contact some of your fellow countrypersons already in the U. S. of A. for details on how to ride legally, or ride illegally. Worse they'll do to you for riding illegal is write you a citation.


Outstanding. 2014, it's on!



Thanks to everyone who responded.
 

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3 hots and a cot if you guys make it to Cali.



We've really enjoyed your posts over time.
 

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I'm sure there is plenty of chatter on this topic on the ADV Forum, (note: their site is down all day, today, supporting Wikipedia). You might want to check out there website. Your options are purchasing a bike in Canada and riding in from there --I'm not sure of the issues but that might be an easier way to enter -- And then check out individual states like California (which do not require insurance). Check out and find which has the most liberal regulations-again ADV Forum would be the best resource. Once you are endorsed in one state all other states will accept that states endorsement.



Best of Luck



Mike
 

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you must ride through new england on you states trip. the mountains in new england are much different than the other areas of the country. north east connecticut is a great place to start. look for a place called THE VANILLA BEAN in pomfret, ct. its on one of the most sought after scenic routes in new england.
 

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Texas Hill Country is best ridden during the Spring Wildflower Season. Appalachian Mountains are best riden during the Fall Color Season. Hit the Rocky, Cascade, and Sierra Nevada Mountains during the summer, between the Wildflower and Fall Color seasons to take advantage of their relatively short pleasant weather seasons. Timing is critical for the most memorable experiences. If you time it right, nothing in Europe compares.
 

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Rob, The US is a liability conscious country. I'd be sure to have some sort of liability insurance (covers damage that you do to others and or their property (if you are at fault). Most states would require proof of such insurance to register a bike, and certainly the officer would want to see that proof if he pulled you over in such states. I would think given a few months notice a few of us could keep our eyes open for prospective bikes, but you would want to decide which state was most advantageous to start in (i.e. to register the bike). Some states might not let you register there if you don't live there, and how do you prove you live there (often its a matter of a receipt from rent payment or other symbol of domesticity). We can discuss the pros and cons via PM if you want. I'd bet the tw community would go out of its way to be good hosts for you and Kate and there are organizations like couchsurfers that provide volunteer hosts as you travel around. Keep thinking about it. Tom
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Thanks for all of the detailed responses.




Ideally, I'll be able to arrange liability insurance for all of northern America. I'll have a look on ADV as well as Horizons Unlimited (though I do prefer the more 'personal' nature of the TW forum).



At the moment, our very limited planning is based upon things we would like to see. Then, once decided, we'll play 'dot-to-dot' on the map.



Thanks again, Rob.
 

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And as always turborob you can stay here in Crossville, Tennessee. 86 miles to the Tail of the Dragon; short distance from the Appalachian Mountains; I'm in the Cumberland Mountains; 50 miles from the Devil's Triangle; I'm still planning on my world tour. TW is prepped and ready.
 

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I would highly recommend the following coverages as a minimum:



Liability, which covers losses to others for which you are responsible. $100,000 worth will entice your insurance company to commit resources to protecting its profit margin, allowing you sufficient time to flee civil harrassment.



Personal Injury, which covers your medical bills should you be injured. $250,000 per person, $500,000 per accident, should cover any but the worst case scenarios. U. S. of A. does not have the type of socialized medicine that encourages a lack of personal responsibility.



Un-insured motorist. Same limits as Personal Injury (you won't shive a git about the bike after one of these idiots wallops you). 20,000,000 illegal aliens, 100,000,000 citizens driving without insurance. Most are too irresponsible to insure themselves or teach themselves to drive, stoned, drunk, slapping the kids in the back seat, spent their insurance money on a new G4 phone, texting, putting on makeup, getting a blowjob, smoking, eating dinner, watching TV, reading a book, jacking off, ... . No joke. About 1 in 7 licensed drivers do not have insurance, and there are literally millions of people driving with neither license nor insurance. http://www.statisticbrain.com/uninsured-motorist-statistics/ Generally speaking, the demographics that tend to not have insurance also tend to cause more than their share of crashes, tend to drive unregistered and uninspected older vehicles, etc.



Medi-vac and Medi-jet coverage to get you from a hospital in the U. S. of A. to a hospital in your home nation. You'll be much better able to deal with a medical services system with which you are familiar than the myriad hoops that make up the U. S. A. system of provision and billing. Also, everyone knows socialized medicine is the best, right?
 
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