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Although it's unlikely that Hurricane Irene's full force will hit S.VT, we're almost certain to contend with high velocity winds. My temp housing is a 24' camper; my TW's temp housing is the space under my awning with everything else that will, eventually, have a home in a garage/shed. The awning itself and all lightweight items will be secured away, somehow, but I'm wondering if folks have suggestions for how to best insure against damage (to the bike, I mean, although perhaps people have RV advice, too)?



Tx.
 

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Do you have a storage unit complex nearby. Maybe you could store your TW and any other valuables in one for the short term. Better than being out in the open if the winds are as strong as you anticipate.
 

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I like the storage unit idea. Find one big enough for your entire rig. That's the voice of experience. I've been RVing all my life. I've been in 80mph straightline winds from summer thunderstorms. That is scary.



Irene is supposed to hit Maine late Sunday or early Monday. She should already be downgraded to a tropical storm by then, top sustained wind speed of 73mph. Even so, what you need to do to prepare depends on the expected wind speed, direction, and terrain that could funnel wind or protect from the wind. There is also the risk of flooding to consider. You will need to take a look in the daylight and assess your current location.



Probably nothing to worry about at your current location if you are not in a flood plain, the awning is secure (including the one across the front), and you and your neighbors pick up anything light enough to blow around. Don't stash anything under the RV, put everything inside--the more weight inside the more stable it will be. Fill the water, holding, and propane tanks. If you have containers with lids, fill them with water, too, in case the water supply is knocked out. Might as well stock up on canned goods. Canned goods are heavy and make good ballast, and if food becomes scarce you'll be fed.



Check any nearby trees for cracked/dead branches and get those down before the storm hits. Cut them up for firewood and stack the wood on your RV tongue and rear bumper, even if it takes a tiedown or two to keep them there. Try to turn your RV so the wind hits the front or rear--less chance to blow it over that way. Best is to hook the RV to the tow vehicle and point the rig into the wind. I expect the RV has already seen apparent wind from the front greater than 73mph. That would be the equivalent to riding down the highway at 55mph with a 15-20mph headwind.



Jacks on boards or blocks to spread the load in mud and tight at all 4 corners to maximize load distribution. Stack objects on the windward side of the RV, for the same reason one sits on the gunwale of a sailboat. If the wind shifts and starts hitting the side instead of the ends, move all the stuff to the windward side.



As for your TW, either load it in your tow vehicle or put it in the RV. If neither is an option, I'd use a blanket as padding, and strap the TW tight to the back bumper of the RV.



So far, all the options I've given are free. This one will cost a bit. Auger style earth anchors at each corner. You can also bury a 4-foot long, 6+-inch diameter log at each corner about 2 feet down and fasten the RV to the logs.



If I was the least bit uncomfortable I'd evacuate--load everything up and head west to the nearest mountains, find a spot to camp down in a valley running 90* to the expected wind direction. If this is a viable option, make sure the rig is ready to roll with minimal prep: tires aired, everything loaded and secure, tow vehicle serviced, etc.



I'm sending ^i^ ^i^ ^i^ to calm and watch over you.
 

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The biggest problem I had with similar strong winds is damage caused by large trees or parts of trees falling. Lost my favorite van that way, fortunately the tree did not strike the house. Get what you can into storage and I hope that you will be spared from the worst.
 

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At the very least make sure that the bike won't tilt over because of the substrate softening or due to winds. If your bike has to sit under the awning, I'd at least put some guy wires on it to make sure its upright at the end of the blow. Place a big board under the kickstand, and use some straps to make sure it wont blow over. Good luck and stay safe. Tom
 

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Although it's unlikely that Hurricane Irene's full force will hit S.VT, we're almost certain to contend with high velocity winds. My temp housing is a 24' camper; my TW's temp housing is the space under my awning with everything else that will, eventually, have a home in a garage/shed. The awning itself and all lightweight items will be secured away, somehow, but I'm wondering if folks have suggestions for how to best insure against damage (to the bike, I mean, although perhaps people have RV advice, too)?



Tx.


Being on the Eastern Shore of MD we are supposed to get close to a direct hit, and this whole peninsula is flat and low-lying. Glad I have a storage shed for the TW, but it may all blow away. May have to evacuate, but I won't except "maybe" if it becomes mandatory. My next door neighbor out here in the country is in a small trailer in rough condition... if they can stay my double-wide here should be OK. They have so much junk in their yard, though it might act like shrapnel.



Got my cameras all charged up...
 

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We just had a visit from Irene, Tuesday night to Wednesday morning. Wind 100mph, gusts up to 115mph. Lots and lots of rain. While my house suffered no damage, a neighbor lost over half of the roof. Went out yesterday evening to check on a friend and drove my TW through a flooded road. No problem until I hit a spot where the road was washed away and my TW died (drowned). I hope I can resurrect her later today. Let her sleep and hopefully dry a little at another friends house. Any advise? I tried to start her up without success in the water and just hope no water got into the air filter but there may be a chance it did.
 

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Peter, the thing that you don't want to happen is for water to get into the combustion chamber through the air intake. When water does this, your engine becomes "hydrauliced." This is a condition where water gets sucked into the combustion chamber, the intake & exhaust valves close, then the piston comes up, tries to compress the water (which doesn't compress, by the way) and then something breaks.




If you think you have water in your combustion chamber, pull the spark plug out & then crank the engine to make the water squirt out the spark plug hole. Make sure all the water is out before you screw the spark plug back in.



You should also make sure the air filter element is clean & dry & make sure there's no water in the crankcase. If you have water in the crankcase, you should change the oil & oil filter. Check/do all this stuff before you try to start your bike again. Good luck, hope your bike's o.k.




-Lorddaftbiker
 

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Took spark plug out, cranked her up a few times, changed the oil (still no motor cycle oil but a Forum member was kind enough to ship 6 qts which I will get next week, nice isn't it? Great forum!!)cleaned oil filter and stainer, cleaned air filter, element, put graphite on chain, kept my fingers crossed and started her up. Not a cough!!!! Just a nice and clean start.Took her for a little spin and now there is one happy TW owner again!!!



Thanks for all the advise
 

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Being on the Eastern Shore of MD we are supposed to get close to a direct hit, and this whole peninsula is flat and low-lying. Glad I have a storage shed for the TW, but it may all blow away. May have to evacuate, but I won't except "maybe" if it becomes mandatory. My next door neighbor out here in the country is in a small trailer in rough condition... if they can stay my double-wide here should be OK. They have so much junk in their yard, though it might act like shrapnel.



Got my cameras all charged up...
If you're on the Eastern Shore of Maryland planning to ride Irene out in a doublewide, you're a fool. Rationalizing that you're safe because the neighbor's place is junkier is beyond foolish. Due to the unusually large diameter of the high winds surrounding the eye the storm surge is likely to be more severe than wind speeds will indicate. Also, the size and relatively slow movement combine to provide more hours of sustained high winds than normal, resulting in increasing risk of structural failures due to material fatigue. The eye is projected to pass close enough to the Eastern Shore that wind direction will be from all points of the compass at one time or another, another contributor to material fatigue.



By the time Irene reaches New York, she'll be downgraded to a tropical storm. I expect by the time she reaches Maine she'll carry maximum susyained winds no greater than 50mph--hardly much of a threat. She'll still be dumping a lot of rain, though, so flooding could be a problem.
 

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By the time Irene reaches New York, she'll be downgraded to a tropical storm.








I hope you're right. Cutting vaca short to return to Long Island and batten down the hatches. Been through many of these.......found its better to be over prepared than not at all
 

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If you're on the Eastern Shore of Maryland planning to ride Irene out in a doublewide, you're a fool. Rationalizing that you're safe because the neighbor's place is junkier is beyond foolish. Due to the unusually large diameter of the high winds surrounding the eye the storm surge is likely to be more severe than wind speeds will indicate. Also, the size and relatively slow movement combine to provide more hours of sustained high winds than normal, resulting in increasing risk of structural failures due to material fatigue. The eye is projected to pass close enough to the Eastern Shore that wind direction will be from all points of the compass at one time or another, another contributor to material fatigue.



By the time Irene reaches New York, she'll be downgraded to a tropical storm. I expect by the time she reaches Maine she'll carry maximum susyained winds no greater than 50mph--hardly much of a threat. She'll still be dumping a lot of rain, though, so flooding could be a problem.






Ok your opinion... but what's up with the name calling? Pretty judgemental I'd say... how about you do what moves you and let everyone else do the same? Maybe it will kill me, maybe I'm OK with that... is that foolish? I think that is a matter of opinion, might turn out everyone who is panicking are the fools. Nope even you can't predict the future.
 

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If you're on the Eastern Shore of Maryland planning to ride Irene out in a doublewide, you're a fool. Rationalizing that you're safe because the neighbor's place is junkier is beyond foolish. Due to the unusually large diameter of the high winds surrounding the eye the storm surge is likely to be more severe than wind speeds will indicate. Also, the size and relatively slow movement combine to provide more hours of sustained high winds than normal, resulting in increasing risk of structural failures due to material fatigue. The eye is projected to pass close enough to the Eastern Shore that wind direction will be from all points of the compass at one time or another, another contributor to material fatigue.



By the time Irene reaches New York, she'll be downgraded to a tropical storm. I expect by the time she reaches Maine she'll carry maximum susyained winds no greater than 50mph--hardly much of a threat. She'll still be dumping a lot of rain, though, so flooding could be a problem.






Ok your opinion... but what's up with the name calling? Pretty judgemental and childish I'd say... how about you do what you feel is right for you and let everyone else do the same? Maybe it will kill me, maybe I'm OK with that... is that foolish? I think that is a matter of opinion, might turn out everyone who is panicking are the fools. Nope even you can't predict the future. I am well aware of the possibilities. I've been around at least 10 hurricanes, I'd have to go back and count but I've seen waves coming over floodwalls, damage in the Outer Banks after/during a couple biggies, etc.



I'm more concerned about my neighbor's "stuff" becoming projectiles, but I am aware and will deal with that.



Here is a scenario:

2 soldiers are heading into battle.

One goes rushing in completely unaware and blind to what dangers may lie ahead.

The other, forges forward into the fray fully aware of all the possible dangers but welcoming them.



To me the first one is acting foolish, the second is a good soldier.



If they'd let me I'd be heading into Ocean City with my video equipment.



EVERYONE does things that someone else will consider foolish...
 

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Have you ever been through a hurricane? I have. At the peak of the storm you will be absolutely powerless to do anything helpful if something goes wrong. Sometimes discretion is the better part of valor, even if your soldier story is misapplied logic.



Prepare your property, go camping in the Blue Ridge Mountains. If all goes well, your property will be fine when you return and you'll have enjoyed a nice weekend in the mountains. If not, at least you'll still be alive and well and not forcing others to put themselves at risk to save your ass. Time to grow up and lose some of that HeMan narcissism.



Those who video the storms for news agencies are preceded by structural engineers who work with directors and meteorologists to determine the safest perches from which to obtain dramatic video. Local governments usually invest heavily in engineering storm-resistent headquarters and temporary accommodations for first responders, or stage rescue and recovery equipment well away from the at-risk locations. If you are capable of analyzing your shoot locations, have at it. After all, CNN employees can do it so it can't be that difficult.
I hope you get awesome video and make a fortune selling it to the news agencies. Otherwise, practice a little discretion--nobody needs to become a statistic.
 

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Have you ever been through a hurricane? I have. At the peak of the storm you will be absolutely powerless to do anything helpful if something goes wrong. Sometimes discretion is the better part of valor, even if your soldier story is misapplied logic.



Prepare your property, go camping in the Blue Ridge Mountains. If all goes well, your property will be fine when you return and you'll have enjoyed a nice weekend in the mountains. If not, at least you'll still be alive and well and not forcing others to put themselves at risk to save your ass. Time to grow up and lose some of that HeMan narcissism.



Those who video the storms for news agencies are preceded by structural engineers who work with directors and meteorologists to determine the safest perches from which to obtain dramatic video. Local governments usually invest heavily in engineering storm-resistent headquarters and temporary accommodations for first responders, or stage rescue and recovery equipment well away from the at-risk locations. If you are capable of analyzing your shoot locations, have at it. After all, CNN employees can do it so it can't be that difficult.
I hope you get awesome video and make a fortune selling it to the news agencies. Otherwise, practice a little discretion--nobody needs to become a statistic.


No He-man stuff here, but I'm not fear-motivated either.



As I said I've been through LOTS of hurricanes starting with Hazel in 1955, where I sat with my dad on the front porch and watched it do it's thing.



I don't expect anyone to come to my "rescue"... I am rather independent and have prepared in many ways... have solar power backup, about 40 gallons of pure water, lots of food, etc. I am an avid camper and survivalist. I have been involved in photography/video for many years and I am aware of what news agencies, etc. do in these circumstances.



I love watching nature at work, even if it means at my own peril.. after all we are all part of nature and it is part of us, so I will continue to watch it go by...



So far I haven't got much as far as pics or video, except my amazement at the hummingbirds who are still feeding even in high winds at my feeder. I had taken it down this morning so it wouldn't blow through my window but they were looking for it so it's back up and doing fine. It will come down tonight when the wind is supposed to increase and they won't be feeding.



Too many people in my opinion are much more ruled by fear of "what might happen" in general in their lives than I care to be. So far I am not really impressed by this storm... compared to others I've seen.
 

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<hmmmm> Probably a little late with this advice, but for next foul weather situation... ground anchors and metal straps on the RV like they require for Mobil Homes.



For the bike... wrap with deck chair pads and tarp then use dog chain anchors and rope to tie it to the ground.



 

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Forgive my ignorance, bujt will a motorcycle really blow away in a hurricane?


In 1989 Hurricane Hugo Pulled the USS Yorktown (Charleston, SC) off of it's concrete moorings and drove its stern aground in to a mud flat so deep, she was unable to be pulled free. She was re-moored in place.



Irene was kind to us. The eye was 150 miles offshore. We got rain bands, moderate winds. We've seen worse afternoon thunderstorms.
 

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Well, ericj, since you are an expert hurrican rider, have fun. Be sure your video camera is in a waterproof enclosure just in case so there will be some record of what went down after the fact, kinda like that bear expert who went to video a bear.



A hurricane won't blow a motorcycle away, but can knock a motorcycle over or damage it with airborne debris.
 
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