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I want the tall cycle concepts seat, but I'm hesitant to order because of the long delay from order to shipment. Also, I'm not excited about stapling the cover and foam onto the seat.
I think you mean Seat Concepts? You don't staple the foam to the seat, you remove the old foam and cover from your seat, glue the new foam on the seat (shell) with a thin layer of contact cement and staple the new cover over the new foam and on to the old shell. I did this with nothing but a pair of needle nose pliers and a screwdriver: remove all the staples, one side at a time so as not to mangle them, then replace them one at a time in the same holes with a combination of the pliers and a small hammer. Not the prettiest job but it has held together for 8 years.
 

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Hey look, actual smart people actually giving good advice! Are you guys aliens, or something? I don't see this sort of thing here on Earth.

Anyways...here is a copy of the new engine break-in methodology that I developed for myself after many hours of deep research on the topic. I have done the factory method (religiously followed what you will find in your TW owner's manual...) on a TW200, and I have done my research-driven method on two other new bikes. Although admittedly very much anecdotal, my experiences suggest that the latter is far better/more complete/more accurate than the former (in terms of overall power, oil consumption, etc.). Feel free to follow as much or as little of it as you wish LOL (some of it will be "too late" anyway), but yea here it is.


*Do several complete heat cycles (warm up the engine then let it cool completely over several hours) in the first couple of hundred miles; the very first heat cycle should simply be about 3 minutes of engine idling -- after that cycle, the rest should be around 10 to 15 minutes of riding.


*Always warm up the motor for a minute before riding; go easy on it while it's still cold (3 to 5 minutes of riding).


*During "normal" break-in riding, very frequently vary your throttle, engine RPM, speed, and gear selection (but don't use top gear too much); punctuate this about every 10 miles with a wide open (full throttle) blast up to about 90% of engine redline (max RPM) and then letting engine braking slow you back down to a low RPM (around 25% of redline); ideally, this should be in second or third gear (being mindful of speed limits...).


*Do not CONSISTENTLY/CONSTANTLY operate the vehicle at over 1/2 throttle for the first 600 miles; do not consistently/constantly operate the vehicle at over 2/3 throttle from 600 to 1,000 miles; note: still ensure frequent acceleration and deceleration under engine braking (just NOT normally at or near full throttle, except as noted^^).


*Change the engine oil and filter very early and very frequently during the first thousand miles -- at 0 miles (immediately after first heat cycle) and then at 25, 100, 250, 600, and 1,000 miles.


*Avoid running the engine for too long (not more than 10 or 15 minutes during the first few rides) without letting it cool down completely, especially during the first 250 miles.


*Be careful not to lug the engine too much during break-in: generally, keep the transmission a gear lower than you would normally use at any given speed and try to avoid riding on steeper hills.
 

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I'm having a hard time putting miles on mine... After buying the bike and helmet I learned that I need a motorcycle specific license for NC. I made an appointment at the DMV, but they are booked out all the way through November. So, legally, I have to wait 6 weeks to take the motorcycle driving exam before I can drive it on the country roads around my home. There is a 2 mile long gravel road that my neighbors live on. I'm pretty sure they are tired of watching me and my young daughters running up and down their 2 mile long driveway over and over again.

I've had it a week and I've only got 30 miles on it. 15 trips down that same gravel road, at 20mph, is getting old quick. But, my kids love riding on the back with me, and that is a huge plus. I have been thanking God for giving us such a fun way to spend time together. Just me and my girls. One of the neighbors, on that gravel road, has a horse so we take carrots with us on each ride...

Making memories!
If those southeastern States are handling this Covid thing like sunny southern Oregon is, you should oughta just get the exam appointment and ride the bike. I have been riding my little Honda Helix with no plate at all since Ole Blue the hound was a pup.

I have been told that nobody cares right now. We'll see bit do far it has proved true. My VIN inspection at the DMV just got moved up to December.

PS... My 30 year old Son has been waiting almost a year for a spot in the motorcycle endorsement class.

Sent from my Pixel 3a XL using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
If those southeastern States are handling this Covid thing like sunny southern Oregon is, you should oughta just get the exam appointment and ride the bike. I have been riding my little Honda Helix with no plate at all since Ole Blue the hound was a pup.

I have been told that nobody cares right now. We'll see bit do far it has proved true. My VIN inspection at the DMV just got moved up to December.

PS... My 30 year old Son has been waiting almost a year for a spot in the motorcycle endorsement class.

Sent from my Pixel 3a XL using Tapatalk
I'm about to leave work early and go for my first road ride. Wish me luck. I'll report back this evening. I probably won't go far, 20 or 30 miles on the country roads near my house.
 

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Buy the right stapler ( like a forward shooting POWERSHOT) and the Seat Concepts cover is not a difficult installation.
View attachment 219144
Or most any upholstery shop should be able to do the stapling for you. A quick 15 minute job but you face possible placement at end of line of previous customers. If lucky you might find idle hands due to supply deficiencies for materials for those ahead in the queue. Perhaps go just before lunch and wave cash.
I was sorting through dads tools a couple weeks ago and found that stapler in there... pulled the trigger (I had to) and could not believe this gem has not been known to me all these years using archaic staple guns from the Middle Ages! Lighting fuses and using a team of peasants to load.

The power shot is such an easy pull and still has a ton of power.

Fred is beyond right, everyone needs this stapler for seat installs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
I'm about to leave work early and go for my first road ride. Wish me luck. I'll report back this evening. I probably won't go far, 20 or 30 miles on the country roads near my house.
I did it! I drove a motorcycle, on a paved road, for the first time in over 20 years.

The first mile was unnerving, going from 0 to 55mph because of all the traffic on that main road... I couldn't believe the amount of wind resistance that was hitting me head on. Then, I met a large gravel dump truck coming in the opposite direction and I felt the wind from the truck move my bike an inch or two... But the nervousness quickly faded...

After the first 5 minutes I literally didn't feel the wind anymore. My mind and body quickly got used to it and it faded from my consciousness.

I drove 35 miles in about 40 minutes, varying my speed, rpms, and gears. I consciously made an effort to vary my speed fluctuating between 40 and 65mph. I tried to remember to do some of the break in tasks listed in earlier comments.

I really enjoyed it! Best of all, during those 40 minutes, I didn't think about work a single time. I really needed that time to focus on something enjoyable. I could see bike rides becoming my new "me time".

The only bad thing that happened, I was headed home, only about two miles from home when the engine gave a sputter and died. I was going down hill, running 60mph, with cars behind me and I ran out of gas.

Luckily, there was room to pull over on the shoulder. I switched it to reserve and it cranked right back up. No problem. I made it exactly 64 miles, on the first tank of gas, before I had to dip into reserve. Does that sound about right? Or did the Yamaha dealer skimp on the "free tank" when I picked it up?

There's your update. I illegally drove on the road and survived! I can't wait to do it again, hopefully tomorrow afternoon.

THANK YOU ALL FOR THE SUPPORT AND WISE INSTRUCTION ON BREAK IN!
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
I forgot to add... The mirrors are absolutely worthless. When I look into them, all I see is my biceps and elbows. I even pulled over and adjusted them. No matter what position I put them in, my arms or shoulders blocked my view. I need to buy new mirrors...

I had to turn my head around and do a quick peek behind me whenever I wondered if there was a car behind me or not...

I saw two other guys on motorcycles. They both waved at me. I wanted to wave back but was afraid to take my left hand off the grip. I hope they don't think I was just being rude...
 

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We all knew you'd like it. About those mirrors, if you play with them you can make it better. Loosen them at the bottom and turn them til they are at they're very widest and then adjust the top part. Still won't be perfect.

I was going to heat and bend that lower bend but ended up spending a chunk of money on these...

Doubletake Mirror - Indestructible Motorcycle Mirrors- Enduro set https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07BHVTHVY/ref=cm_sw_r_awdo_navT_g_HRGGKSYG086P8PJ178EW

I love them up til 47 mph when they make cars and trucks all look like blobs of fuzz.

Unbreakable and you can get longer stems.

.

.

PS... Ditto what they are saying about that backwards stapler. It's da best.
 

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Congrats man. That new-bike honeymoon period is always the greatest. I do hope to get "married" again soon LOL! I have found that motorcycling is indeed a fantastically therapeutic form of blissful escapism: no work, no BS, no worries!
 

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Alabamacoastie's ride report so well captures that thrill we all likely felt on our first ride, or one after a 20 year break. Doesn't matter what age. Wow, suddenly here is this freedom machine opening a window into an exciting new world of experiences, wow! But a freedom machine that has the potential to bite the unwary. That does tend to get one's attention on the first rides. Thus we tend to climb the learning curve or remembered skills pretty quickly.:)
 

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I did it! I drove a motorcycle, on a paved road, for the first time in over 20 years.

The first mile was unnerving, going from 0 to 55mph because of all the traffic on that main road... I couldn't believe the amount of wind resistance that was hitting me head on. Then, I met a large gravel dump truck coming in the opposite direction and I felt the wind from the truck move my bike an inch or two... But the nervousness quickly faded...

After the first 5 minutes I literally didn't feel the wind anymore. My mind and body quickly got used to it and it faded from my consciousness.

I drove 35 miles in about 40 minutes, varying my speed, rpms, and gears. I consciously made an effort to vary my speed fluctuating between 40 and 65mph. I tried to remember to do some of the break in tasks listed in earlier comments.

I really enjoyed it! Best of all, during those 40 minutes, I didn't think about work a single time. I really needed that time to focus on something enjoyable. I could see bike rides becoming my new "me time".

The only bad thing that happened, I was headed home, only about two miles from home when the engine gave a sputter and died. I was going down hill, running 60mph, with cars behind me and I ran out of gas.

Luckily, there was room to pull over on the shoulder. I switched it to reserve and it cranked right back up. No problem. I made it exactly 64 miles, on the first tank of gas, before I had to dip into reserve. Does that sound about right? Or did the Yamaha dealer skimp on the "free tank" when I picked it up?

There's your update. I illegally drove on the road and survived! I can't wait to do it again, hopefully tomorrow afternoon.

THANK YOU ALL FOR THE SUPPORT AND WISE INSTRUCTION ON BREAK IN!
When riding fast and/or into a headwind, don't just grip the bars tighter...that will wear you out in no time!
Instead, scoot back on the saddle...to the point where you can more or less "balance" yourself against the wind blast. "Lean in" as much as you need to.
It's easy & fun.
Ever hear someone say, "Man, that's just like flying!" That's how he/she came to that conclusion...

When turning left or right, lean slightly in the turn direction. Better control & smoother. "Smooth" is the Holy Grail!
The sharper or quicker the turn, lean more.
But don't fall off!

And continue to keep us posted on your grand journey into motorcycles and motorcycling...most of us old boots will love riding along with you!
 

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Alabamacoastie's ride report so well captures that thrill we all likely felt on our first ride, or one after a 20 year break. Doesn't matter what age. Wow, suddenly here is this freedom machine opening a window into an exciting new world of experiences, wow! But a freedom machine that has the potential to bite the unwary. That does tend to get one's attention on the first rides. Thus we tend to climb the learning curve or remembered skills pretty quickly.:)
Hellz yes!
 

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Alabamacoastie:

More nuggets from the rusty old memory banks:
Don't ride in the center of the traffic lane...street or hiway. That's where trash, shrapnel & oil drips from 4-wheelers accumulates. You are more likely to get a flat there. There is also diminished traction there. Ride in the clean areas where car tires roll. When wet, that center area is slicker than snot on a door knob!

NEVER allow someone to "tailgate" you. Flash your brake-light (without actually braking) to get their attention.
Or change lanes. Or turn off. Or speed up. Whatever it takes.
I've known a few riders through the years who carry a handful of ball bearings or small rocks in their jacket pockets to toss over their shoulder for tailgaters! I do not recommend this...
I also stopped "flipping them the bird" a long time ago...always avoid pissing off anyone with more wheels than you.

"Cover" both your brakes all/most of the time. It will significantly reduce your braking reaction time.

No alcohol, weed or strong meds...they will make you brave, clumsy & stupid. And in the hospital. Or dead.

Watch for furry creatures in or near the road. They do stupid shit. I've seen panicky deer quickly change direction several times before I could get around them.

Learn to trust your tires.

Look for danger all the time/everywhere. Don't trust anybody with any vehicle with more wheels than 1 anywhere near you...assume they can, and possibly will try to kill you. Or maybe just by accident. They are big, you are little.

ATGATT! "All the gear, all the time!"

Try to find a MSF (Motorcycle Safety Foundation) "Learn to Ride" class. Quick, easy, 1-day, cheap & fun...and it can save your life!

Don't let yourself get paranoid about all this...just defensive, "woke" and aware!

A trusted old axiom from my long past free-fall skydiving training days was never more true:
"Relax to the point of control."

And have LOTS of fun!
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
Alabamacoastie:

More nuggets from the rusty old memory banks:
Don't ride in the center of the traffic lane...street or hiway. That's where trash, shrapnel & oil drips from 4-wheelers accumulates. You are more likely to get a flat there. There is also diminished traction there. Ride in the clean areas where car tires roll. When wet, that center area is slicker than snot on a door knob!

NEVER allow someone to "tailgate" you. Flash your brake-light (without actually braking) to get their attention.
Or change lanes. Or turn off. Or speed up. Whatever it takes.
I've known a few riders through the years who carry a handful of ball bearings or small rocks in their jacket pockets to toss over their shoulder for tailgaters! I do not recommend this...
I also stopped "flipping them the bird" a long time ago...always avoid pissing off anyone with more wheels than you.

"Cover" both your brakes all/most of time time. It will significantly reduce your braking reaction time.

No alcohol, weed or strong meds...they will make you brave, clumsy & stupid. And in the hospital. Or dead.

Watch for furry creatures in or near the road. They do stupid shit. I've seen panicky deer quickly change direction several times before I could get around them.

Learn to trust your tires.

Look for danger all the time/everywhere. Don't trust anybody with any vehicle with more wheels than 1 anywhere near you...assume they can, and possibly will try to kill you. Or maybe just by accident. They are big, you are little.

ATGATT! "All the gear, all the time!"

Try to find a MSF (Motorcycle Safety Foundation) "Learn to Ride" class. Quick, easy, 1-day, cheap & fun...and it can save your life!

Don't let yourself get paranoid about all this...just defensive, "woke" and aware!

A trusted old axiom from my long past free-fall skydiving training days was never more true:
"Relax to the point of control."

And have LOTS of fun!
Thank you! I need all the nuggets I can get. I'm definitely going to look for a basic rider safety/ training course.
 

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Discussion Starter · #36 ·
I just got home from ride #2! I don't know exactly how many miles I drove today, but it was close to sixty. I do know that I drove around for a solid hour.

I've been living here for 5 years, and I just drove down roads I didn't even know existed. I didn't care where I ended up. I just drove. I saw some beautiful barns, cows, horses, pastures, crops, churches, schools and fire stations.

I just drove... It was so peaceful. I ended up in the next county over, and had to turn around... And it was all two lane twisty country roads..

Today was better than yesterday in every way. I was cautious, but I wasn't anxious. Each time I took off in 1st gear, it was smoother than yesterday. My stops were smoother. My turns were more controlled. The clutch lever even felt smoother today when releasing. I could feel the sweet spot right in the middle that allowed me to give a little power or take a little back in very slow turns in 1st gear.

I just felt more, "one with the bike" today, you know? I could feel the bike lean with my hands and with my body. Leaning into curves felt more natural, like I didn't even think about it, it just happened.

This whole experience is so awesome.
 

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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
I just posted this on another forum that I've been a member of for several years... It's not a motorcycle forum, but it has a motorcycle section... You'll see that, I am in the dog house with my wife... All of today's fun has now been replaced with marital tension...

"My wife is giving me a hard time about my new motorcycle... She wasn't thrilled when I bought it, but she got over it when I took her for a ride on the gravel dirt road by our house.

It's a street legal dirt bike. It's registered. The new tag came in the mail today, but the damned DMV is appointment only and the first available appointment for a motorcycle written test is Dec 5th...

Well, y'all know a motorcycle engine needs to be broken in, and being confined to a 20mph gravel drive way is not going to get the job done. This bike needs to be reved and ridden!

So yesterday, I put on a helmet and I illegally rode my bike with no tag, and no motorcycle license. I stayed on country roads near my house, outside the city limits, and I HAD A BLAST!

Today, I put another 60 miles on it driving down country roads that I didn't even know existed. It was amazing.... Peace. Fun. Adrenaline. Relaxation. I felt it all. And, I didn't think about work a single time...

My wife doesn't know I've been out enjoying my bike on the road...

This evening, I went online and looked for local Motorcycle Safety Classes that I could sign up for at the community college. The kind where you take the three day class, learn a lot, and you get a certificate to wave the DMV motorcycle driving test...

I was just about to sign up for one of these safety classes in November, but I made the mistake of telling my wife first.

She said, "I don't want you to take that class because then you'll want to drive that thing on the road and there are log trucks. You are going to get killed." "And, this is going to become a thing and you're gonna want a bigger bike and then a bigger bike and I don't want you driving on the road. You have children!"

I said, "I bought a motorcycle. I'm not going to stare at it. I'm going to drive it. And this safety class will make me a better safer rider."

She just walked out of the room. Now she's giving me the cold shoulder."
 

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In the end, no one gets out alive!

Headline: "Man killed in bed, when tree falls on house." So, avoid beds, trees & houses, for that matter I guess.

I feel your pain. The non-riding women in our lives who care, never seem to understand the rationalizations about the personal importance of distinguishing between living & existing. Two very different paths.

Life inherently comes with the risk that it can end for any reason at all, unexpectedly. Them's the breaks.

Bikes aren't everyone's cup of tea. Everyone who rides, & many who don't have a horror story about people facing their mortality on one. Many are so fixed in their thinking, associating motorcycles with mortal peril, they will not be pursuaded to embrace motorcycling as a hobby. Sometimes, we're married to these people. Ah, bliss ensues.

I have no pearls of wisdom, other than to agree with your declaration that you "didn't get it just to look at it."

In the words of Red, from "Shawshank Redemption,"

"...Get busy living, or get busy dying."

Best of luck.
 

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See if there is a Motorcycle Safety Foundation (MSF) Basic Rider Safety course near you. The most common places for them to hold their courses are at community colleges, but it varies. In many states, completing the course will give you the license when you take the certificate into the DMV. I very highly recommend it. You'll learn little things to watch for on the road and it is well worth the money as it could end up saving your life. I've lost count of how many people I've had to react to that did not see me when pulling out or coming up on me at an intersection. Always be mindful of any vehicle's blind spot. People are always looking for something big in their mirrors and even when they turn their head quick when changing lanes. That is a beautiful T-Dub! Be safe!
 
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