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Has anyone tried to increase the traction factor of the OEM rear tire by cutting some of the lugs off of the tire? I would think that cutting every third or every other lug off of the tire would increase the capabilities of the tire. Anybody tried it? I have a rear tire or two for the test. Maybe I could get one mounted on an extra rim for Moab.
Mel
 

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I would think that would work great. I looked at cutting it to match the early style tire as it looks like they just bridged the tread on the new tire to cut down on tire whine and possibly increase tire life...

As far as Moab....Traction is not a problem! Unless you find some deep sand and then I dont think it really matters...
 

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Mel,
Increasing the Void to Lug proportion should certainly make an improvement;it's unfortunate that the lugs are aren't taller in height . But, consider reversing the tire so that the square face of the lugs are then engaging the terra firma instead of those lugs with the angular faces . You can also greatly reduce your inflation pressure to improve things-I'm using 3psi with no tire/rim slippage whatsoever. My TW is ridden off-road only.
 

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Has anyone tried to increase the traction factor of the OEM rear tire by cutting some of the lugs off of the tire? ...
Mel
I would think that would decrease the traction, not increase it. An ATV tire is the solution to more traction, but I've never felt the OEM rear was lacking in traction. I did, however, replace it when it was only a bit over half worn. For me, that was at about 8,000 miles.
 

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First let me say I have no clue; but thinking about it: on the street you want as much tread across that inch of tire in contact with the road. Maybe with siping to add those extra griping edges.

Off-road; removing some lugs you would lose some of the contact patch, but might allow more depth of the lug to grab onto the far side of something you are riding over. Instead of slipping on a tree root, the root falls within the gap and the lug gets more of a grab on it. Interesting.
 

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Admiral and others have cut parts of lugs off, but I don't remember anyone taking lugs all the way off...
 
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Unless you're on really gnarly trails, the stock tire works pretty good. Airing it down to 3-5psi makes a tremendous difference in off road grip over a 20psi street pressure. You can still drive it home at 5psi, you'll just have a little lower top speed and handling will be pretty heavy. I'd have to get in real sloppy stuff, or steep washed out rock-and-root hills before I found it spinning and sliding around. Really was pretty impressive for a 50/50 dual sport tire. The limiting factor is it's relatively short lugs. Even if you cut every third one out to give some more void area, the lug is just too short to really "grab" anything, like rock edges or tree roots. It might help the tire self-clear in mud a little, but to me it would be a lot more effort than it's worth.

More void area generally means better off road traction, since each lug carries more the the bike's weight and thus sinks into softer terrain for more bite. On pavement this obviously isn't an issue, why street tires really only have voids to deal with channeling water away from the tread. Larger voids between lugs also allows the tire to self-clean better- mud will fling out on it's own, rather than get trapped between lugs and "clog" the tire up.

Even running the chunky Duro, I lean it as hard over as I want on the street. The bike isn't powerful or heavy enough to overwhelm it, despite the increased void area.
 

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Mel,
Increasing the Void to Lug proportion should certainly make an improvement;it's unfortunate that the lugs are aren't taller in height . But, consider reversing the tire so that the square face of the lugs are then engaging the terra firma instead of those lugs with the angular faces . You can also greatly reduce your inflation pressure to improve things-I'm using 3psi with no tire/rim slippage whatsoever. My TW is ridden off-road only.
I recently did a hare scramble and dropped my pressures to around 15 psi thinking it would help me out, which I imagine it did but there was no noticeable improvement in traction in the real greasy stuff. I would love to now how this lug modification could be beneficial but more to the point, I think dropping pressures down way low would be a great alternative to making drastic changes to what is at the end of the day, a dual sport tire. I can't imagine it could ever really grip like a knobby but it has to be a pretty big improvement.
 

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And here is some conservative trimming to individual tread blocks by old dual ride back in 2013. He removes only ~1/8'..
WP_000080.jpg WP_000085.jpg WP_000099.jpg
 

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Fred & LT: patterned after what this fellow did above, I did the same thing with a rear tire a few years back. I don't remember any significant gain when I did this. It didn't hurt the tire any, I just don't remember getting that awesome traction feeling when I took it out on the trails. If it worked, I just couldn't tell. Removing lugs completely as Mel suggests is just not something I'll tackle at this time.
 

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A while I cut about a quarter inch off of each lug in the center of my aging tire just to give it a little bit of bite again. It may have made a small difference but nothing major. I have a duro power grip on the way now! :D

I've never used a "knobby knife" but I've found that a vibrating cast cutter like what they use in the hospitals slices through rubber pretty freaking fast. What have you guys that have cut your tires done it with?

Sent from my HTC6525LVW using Tapatalk
 

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Here is old post of Ronnydog's sipped tire. He might have feedback on any performance gains. View attachment 23653
Grooving and siping tires for many years. Yes it helps in some terrains. I always want the most traction I can get. Siping can keep the tire cooler on hot assault, improved breaking and reaction. Here is some more info, lesschwab.com>performance-siping

ronnydog
 

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First let me say I have no clue; but thinking about it: on the street you want as much tread across that inch of tire in contact with the road. Maybe with siping to add those extra griping edges.

Off-road; removing some lugs you would lose some of the contact patch, but might allow more depth of the lug to grab onto the far side of something you are riding over. Instead of slipping on a tree root, the root falls within the gap and the lug gets more of a grab on it. Interesting.
I would think siping would be good. I know it improved my snow tires 100% I think I might look into the auto type of siping, small, with 1000s of cuts and some long ways for the side slipping
 

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I keep thinking of trials tires, the lack of space between lugs, not too much depth, and low tire pressure. Why do they get so much traction? If there was an option of a 14 inch trials tire for our TW's I would buy one and try it. As for the angular blocks, is that for moving the loose, slippery stuff out of the way to get to better traction? just wondering. Don't have answers, just questions.
 

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Trials tires often combine softer rubber tread compounds and flexible sidewalls in addition to the actual tread pattern.
 

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I keep thinking of trials tires, the lack of space between lugs, not too much depth, and low tire pressure. Why do they get so much traction? If there was an option of a 14 inch trials tire for our TW's I would buy one and try it. As for the angular blocks, is that for moving the loose, slippery stuff out of the way to get to better traction? just wondering. Don't have answers, just questions.
At low pressure the trials tire "bites" or "squeezes" the terrain below it... thus more traction on dry surfaces.
 

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I was thinking about siping the OEM front tires for better traction on the asphalt logging roads in western Oregon covered in moss n needles. Anyone have any input or suggestions to pattern?
 
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