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Discussion Starter #1
The dealer is installing a power grip on my rear rim and I’ll be picking it up later today or tomorrow to put it on

I also grabbed a 55T sprocket and new chain..


Just like to get ahead of the game

Thx for any input guys
 

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So you have the swingarm extensions already? No input or pictures but had a friend considering this mod once.
 

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Just to scare you and hopefully have you warn the dealer of risks involved you should review some of the many Duro install threads on here, like this: [h=3]Blew up my new duro power grip :([/h]
Actually trimming the bead and SLOW inflation to moderate pressures can work if you give the tire several days for the bead to seat with heat and repetitive inflation/deflation cycles. The typical tire installer will think he know better than the customer and try to seat the bead with ever increasing pressures until a failure occurs. I ask the tire monkey to simply spoon the Duro on over the rim then take tire home to finish the bead seating using a quality tire grease, 30 to 50 psi, lots of heat and patience...like 3 days of patience.

There are many threads on Forum about this, use the search feature and review some if time permits.

Now I hate to go through all of this dis-mount, re-mount again when a puncture occurs so like proactive preventative measures like sealing the spokes to go tube-less and/or using a tire sealant/balancing compound like RideOn
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I did a ton of reasearch before I attempted this. Really my only worry was the tire being out of actual spec. I’ve had quite a few Duro tires for my ATC BigRed trikes and it seems not all Duro’s are exact and the same model tires can differ from one and other... size and shape...

The install seemed to go rather easy and quick for the dealer. They have a tire machine and used lots of soapy water to get it to seat.

I’m positive all the horror stories you hear are guys that don’t take their time and don’t use proper lubricant.

As for my end of the install, it went well.

With the 55T sprocket my adjusters are set at 6• with the minimum allowed slack. Of course this is with a new chain.

This setting allows for the most minimal clearance for the tire on the forward most part of the swing arm. So it worked out really well actually.

I even bought a 54T sprocket incase. It would literally work as a half link. But I’m glad the 55T worked so well for that extra bit of torque

All in all I’m super happy with the results.

I’m doing a lot of technical riding and this is a bush only bike. The larger sprocket is fabulous. The bike has more torque even with the larger tire and clutch engagement is so easy. You could walk beside the bike in first. It’s perfect for my use.

If you don’t use your TW200 on the road I highly recommend this mod.

I’ll put up some more pictures after I do some snow snow and mud riding this weekend in the forest.

And one other thing... the new tire really soaks up the bumps.. WOW
 

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Yay, congratulations!
Welcome to the 2-wheel Duro experience. Imagine the 3-wheel Duro trike experience was a thrill too.
Those were well said comments about the Duro's benefits.
I took TW-Brian's advice about further gearing down and put about 7,000 miles on my original Duro using 13 x 55 sprockets. Now run a rounder Terracross for a sportier ride at a mild loss of ultimate traction .
 

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Excellent comments everyone. I didnt realise you needed to go 55T. Im building an off road only machine and the Duro is on the shopping list. I was thinking though additional clearance from a swingarm extension was the go, Ive got one organised (but not paid for yet).
 

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Neither a 55 tooth rear sprocket nor an extended swingarm are really mandatory. Since the Duro is taller & heavier than stock, and we tend to put on an ATV tire for gnarly terrains then the 55 tooth often makes sense to create a mountain goat TW. Similarly the swingarm to tire clearance is acceptable. An extended swingarm does reduce chance of debris entrapment while the lenthened wheelbase has somehat of a calming effect.
There are ways to create a bit more clearance though.;) .

 

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Discussion Starter #13
Well after a solid test yesterday, I must say the new tire was well worth the expense.

Any Motorsport mods in Canada are a complete ripoff. All you guys in the states paying peanuts for your Duro’s.... mine was almost $170 with tax.. my sprocket was $47... and the new chain was $42..

And then the $45 install of the tire...(Well worth it though)

I will agree with what one member said.. the 55T isn’t overly necessary

But imo, it’s worth it if your staying in the bush. The ease of the clutch engagement in technical areas is the benefactor. Along with a slower wheel rotation upon launch.

I found the factory setup (tire and gear ratio) had the rear wheel spin easy in low traction scenarios when your engaging the clutch because having to rev it up more.

Wet leaves, mud... slick hard pack and snow is currently a cake walk with the new setup..

I ended up cutting the lower part of the chain guard off instead of bending it. I originally heated it up and tweaked it but the part of it closest to the tread was tight so I cut it instead of a rubber lug ripping and possibly destroying the entire guard

Here is a good picture...
 

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Lets buy this great new chunky tyre and then strip off the tread!
He was just reducing the corner edges that were rubbing on the front sides of the swingarm. Getting an extended swingarm creates more clearance for tall and square style 14" atv tires. Or you can opt for a more rounded profile tire. Doing a 12" trailer wheel conversion allows shorter atv tires to be used avoiding clearance issues.
 

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Looking good Pot Licker!
You're going to love the experience in marginal traction situations as you stated.
I thought putting the Duro on my TW made the most significant change in the bike's performance and thus my enjoyment of the TW.
The tire plus sprockets really enhance the off-road utility of the bike, extending the riding season significantly once it gets muddy or snowy. "Oh Boy, it's snowing...I'm going riding!"
Safer too when riding alone since stock tire can get overwhelmed by a mudhole leaving you and bike stranded, something that the Duro often can churns through. However one can end up stuck further & deeper from any help with the Duro, but one learns the limits with experience.
 

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Last time I checked there were lots of seeming identical clones of the Duro tread pattern at significant price reductions on Amazon. If I were to do it again however I would experiment with the lighter Duro II like TW-Brian has. I rode his, very nice. After all how much extra flywheel effect does one need from a weighty tire?
Certainly the Duro's big rubbery gyroscope's rotational momentum takes a bigger log or rock shelf to overcome and stall out compared to a stock TrailWing...Something about ol' Charley Newton's Law of Motion about a body in motion tending to stay in motion until acted on by an outside force... A bigger rotating body just takes a bigger outside force.
I like the 10% underdrive of the 55 tooth sprocket but going to a 13 tooth front gave me an additional 8%. Highway and twisty asphalt performance doesn't suffer as much as one would think.
I would conclude with "Have fun!" but it is hard not to have fun on these lil' machines however they are equipped.
 
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