TW200 Forum banner

1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
116 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
before i break out my tire irons and baby powder, is this going to be the same struggle as a dirtbike? i could swap 21/18's pretty easily. gave up on a 19" rear ktm wheel one time and took it to my dealer




im nervous because its not hot outside anymore, so i don't know how warm i can get these new tires before the install



thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
186 Posts
before i break out my tire irons and baby powder, is this going to be the same struggle as a dirtbike? i could swap 21/18's pretty easily. gave up on a 19" rear ktm wheel one time and took it to my dealer




im nervous because its not hot outside anymore, so i don't know how warm i can get these new tires before the install



thanks




I just recently installed my shinko sr428s which is also like the 203/204s. It was a bout 65 degrees outside when we installed them. I didn't have any tire spoons so i toke some cheap box wrenches and ground them into a homemade tire spoon. Then with my dads help we used some dawn soap and water and worked them onto the rims. Just be extra cautious of the tubes. Rear tire was the hardest but we used little movements.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
614 Posts
My tyre changing skills are poor at best, but I can do TW203/204's alright.



Remember to put a little air in the tube before you put the second side of the tyre on the rim. This helps reduce the risk of pinching the tube, and use plenty of soap or even hot water will help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
186 Posts
My tyre changing skills are poor at best, but I can do TW203/204's alright.



Remember to put a little air in the tube before you put the second side of the tyre on the rim. This helps reduce the risk of pinching the tube, and use plenty of soap or even hot water will help.


+1
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
116 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
the front was the easiest tire ive ever installed, the rear was a horrible experience. the rusted up bead on my 87's original tire was a killer to pop. finally got some 6" C-clamps and busted it off
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
116 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
I would file that under "the joy of old motorcycles", as opposed to a TW specific hardship. BTW, the easiest way to break the bead is to run over it with the Corvette.


i actually put a 12 ton bottle jack on the tire, then pressed it up against the frame of our 4wd dodge ram, lol. it still wouldn't budge
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
81 Posts
Both tires took less than a six pack.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,637 Posts
I don't disagree with this but just make sure you can do it. Cause when you get a flat the dealer will not be around.
Good point, especially for those of us who ride out in the middle of nowhere! A few months back on this forum, I saw a video showing how to break the bead of a tire using just tire irons. Basically, you work a small area of the bead (8-12"), back and forth until the bead breaks. Since I needed to change my rear tire, I thought I would give it a try, while in a shop environment. The tire had been on my TW since bought new in 2005. I was able to break the bead in about 3-5 minutes using the technique in the video. Then about 3 week later I got a flat rear tire. (Figures I'd get my first flat right after I put on a new tire!). Used the technique again, no problem. Now I'm very comfortable changing my own tires or fix the tires should the need arise.

Spoke replacement job...maybe I could...:confused:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
200 Posts
I'm sure you could replace the spokes. In a worst case scenario I bet you could have dealt with the tire without watching a video as well, if you were stranded. The thing is, when it is >90 degrees outside and you only have so much time where you can hide from your family and your responsibilities in the garage, you have to pick the jobs you want to do. I like the fun ones, like playing with the carb. I don't like the ones where I have to sit there and deal with rusty spokes for 9 hours when a shop could do it in 1/10th the time.

Same deal with the tires. It is like changing your own oil - if you want to check out your car, great. If you get enjoyment from it, great. But when it only costs $25, even if you could do the same thing in your driveway for just the cost of parts... is that $10-15 savings worth your time? I'd rather crack a cold one and hideout in the bathroom reading this forum! :) So I'm rambling here but I think I made a point somewhere in there about picking and choosing enjoyable bike work and projects that make you want to kick over the toolbox.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
93 Posts
After fixing bikes/cars/RVs/appliances/etc. after "professionals" have been at them, I MAKE time to figure them out, and fix them.
There's NOTHING worse than getting really stuck trailside.
Except being stuck trailside with a storm approaching, or a ravenous horde of mosquitos and blackflies dining.
Or maybe walking or 2 upping out leaving a bike behind.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
17,926 Posts
Ride On sealer and balancer
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
Top