TW200 Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,095 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I just noticed the last few rides that my bikes all of a sudden are running rich? Are they messing with gas formulas again? I am riding in the same areas, the same temps etc. Now I will have to readjust all my carbs but I don't want to do it again in another month or so if they mess with the gas again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
311 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,416 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
378 Posts
Good info.

Ken - the Popular Mechanics article specifically mentions Houston as one of the metro areas that mess with gas blends.
It is rather more complicated than some particular city specifying a standard. While true that some large metropolitan areas with large, crowded populations do have their own requirements it is also true that everywhere has to deal with this. In modern electronic controlled engines the average driver won't notice the change. But on small engines with mechanical fuel systems (carburetor) There is little feedback control of mixture. No computer masking the changes. So it is possible that you will notice the change on a TW. Part of the blending of fuels also includes the addition of oxygen containing compounds. These compounds can also change the mixture requirements of your bike.
Most of us don't generally ride year round. And even on those few out of season excursions we are generally not pushing limits. So the effects of fuel blend changes are blamed on it being too damn cold to ride anyways.
Wow! I ramble don't I. Sorry about that. I'm no expert. Just sharing what I've heard when dad owned a gas station.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,095 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the info. I have noticed particular brands seem to effect performance as well. Maybe some months I need to jump around. I know it sounds crazy and I wouldn't have never believed it. For example, I have only hit 70 mph with Chevron. I don't know why. Here in Houston I usually run Valero or Exon. Why I tend to like Valero is that it was the only one which never pinged when I upped the compression years ago in my Nova. Unless I up the compression like Elime it probably isn't really necessary in a stock TW.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
378 Posts
Most local stations get their fuel from the same regional distributor. Each brand has it's own additive package that is combined with the fuel right before it's trucked to the station. Different combinations of 'detergents' and such. The basic fuel is all the same. You could probably research your local brands and find out where their fuel comes from.
Could all be in my head. But I feel my Suzuki Savage runs better on ethanol free. While it is slightly higher octane I know I don't have the compression to require that. I attribute it to the lack of ethanol which has less energy per volume that real petroleum gas. I try to always top off the tank at the local station that has a dedicated dispenser for it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,562 Posts
i'm really surprised to hear they would mess around with gas blends way down south where there is hardly any freezing. must be a cash grab for the oil companies
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
I would suggest using only the ethanol free gas- works for me. Cleaner- Just expensive, but then again- how many gals at a time are we using.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,443 Posts
"Just expensive, but then again- how many gals at a time are we using." -Having a harem can get expensive.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
604 Posts
I put only the finest garbage in my Mr. Fusion. Gotta get the most out of the Flux Capacitor. 1.21 jigawatts.(91 octane)
The only fuel they mess with around here is diesel. Summer/winter blends, and its expensive because all the posers,(gold miners) think they need a Super duty, Duramax, or Cummins to drive 4 miles to the bus stop.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
378 Posts
i'm really surprised to hear they would mess around with gas blends way down south where there is hardly any freezing. must be a cash grab for the oil companies
Not really. Has to do with the rate at which it will convert to vapor at atmospheric pressure. It's based on EPA regulations. Oil companies would rather not mess with it. Some larger metro areas have their own standards to help combat air pollution. But those are more stringent than EPA regs, not less. As I understand it different regions have different requirements. At any time of year fuels in the south are different than fuels in the north.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,443 Posts
Not only does the fuel composition change regionally but so can the pricing. Go about 30 miles south to the next county and gasoline typically costs 20 to 30 cents cheaper than here.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top