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I've seen threads where folks had to do some mods for bigger Clark tanks. Now I've become aware that Clark has one specific to the TW. Any other mods (seat, mounts, etc.) required?
 

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No. Direct bolt on, although some have found the right side cover to fit improperly. Mine was snug, but acceptable.
 

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My Black Clark Tank is getting a desert test ride this weekend and it bolted right on per instructions however the Right side cover gromet hole is to far forward.I just trimmed the plastic stud off the side cover and plan on leaving it like that for a wile untill I get a solution. looks like a well made tank.

 

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i bought one of the first tanks and it fit fine. I heard of people having problems when i ordered mine and I also heard they were making a adjustment but mine is fine. Ive had min for almost a year and still no problems..
 

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Just bolt the front (long bolt) on first and then it isn't too hard to push the rear toward the center and start the rear bolt. A month or two on the bike and the tank will adjust to its new shape. Do not try to modify the tank.
 

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Just Got my tank in today! Right front panel wont fit so not reading the info on this forum I decided to trim the mounting tab where the panel snaps into the tank. Not a good Idea! You wouldnt think the gas could get down to the mounting tab but just a little grinding with my dremmel tool and I had a leak! I waited close to 20 days to get this tank and now its useless!
 

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Sorry to hear of your misfortune.



The tab on my side panel would not fit either.



I just left it sticking out.



After sitting for 5 months (over the winter) with the tank full of gas, the panel tab went right in... the tank had changed shape.



Just a thought... call or email Clarke and tell them what happened. Maybe they will take pity and exchange your tank, repair it, or sell you one at a reduced rate.



jb
 

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Just Got my tank in today! Right front panel wont fit so not reading the info on this forum I decided to trim the mounting tab where the panel snaps into the tank. Not a good Idea! You wouldnt think the gas could get down to the mounting tab but just a little grinding with my dremmel tool and I had a leak! I waited close to 20 days to get this tank and now its useless!
sorry to read that. someone else on the forum did the same thing before. having the clear version, i could see that those channels were hollow. hopefully people can find the stories of those it happened to and not make the same mistake. someone suggested gas proof epoxy to the other person. maybe something like that could salvage the tank?



i cut my little arms off the panels and drilled holes in them. i wire tie them to the tank. they snug up really nice and work fine.







how it looked before







and after



 

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Just Got my tank in today! Right front panel wont fit so not reading the info on this forum I decided to trim the mounting tab where the panel snaps into the tank. Not a good Idea! You wouldnt think the gas could get down to the mounting tab but just a little grinding with my dremmel tool and I had a leak! I waited close to 20 days to get this tank and now its useless!


It's not useless. You can repair it easily. Clarke (and other) plastic gas tanks are made out of high density polyethylene (HDPE). Empty the tank out and then using an air hose, blow the inside dry to remove all gasoline vapors. Using a propane torch, heat the tip of the dinner knife for 30 seconds or so, then lay it onto the area of the tank on both side of the hole. The hot knife will melt the outer layer of HDPE and as you work it around the hole, you can slowly close the void until hot melted plastic on both sides of the hole come together. As the knife cools, reheat and continue the process. Eventually you can get enough of the melted plastic over the hole so that when it cools off, it forms a solid repair. I have repaired three plastic gas tanks like this. In some cases, if the hole is too large, you can cut up a piece of Nalgene, or any other plastic container with the HDPE logo on the bottom, and melt it into the void. It's not pretty, but it works.
 

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Just Got my tank in today! Right front panel wont fit so not reading the info on this forum I decided to trim the mounting tab where the panel snaps into the tank. Not a good Idea! You wouldnt think the gas could get down to the mounting tab but just a little grinding with my dremmel tool and I had a leak! I waited close to 20 days to get this tank and now its useless!




I know this is an old post... but if you still have the tank I might be interested in purchasing it from you.



z
 

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It's not useless. You can repair it easily. Clarke (and other) plastic gas tanks are made out of high density polyethylene (HDPE). Empty the tank out and then using an air hose, blow the inside dry to remove all gasoline vapors. Using a propane torch, heat the tip of the dinner knife for 30 seconds or so, then lay it onto the area of the tank on both side of the hole. The hot knife will melt the outer layer of HDPE and as you work it around the hole, you can slowly close the void until hot melted plastic on both sides of the hole come together. As the knife cools, reheat and continue the process. Eventually you can get enough of the melted plastic over the hole so that when it cools off, it forms a solid repair. I have repaired three plastic gas tanks like this. In some cases, if the hole is too large, you can cut up a piece of Nalgene, or any other plastic container with the HDPE logo on the bottom, and melt it into the void. It's not pretty, but it works.
HDPE is pretty cool stuff - completely recyclable. There is no adhesive or caulk that will really stick to it or glue it (there is one very expensive product that purports to be PE glue, but it is a very weak bond). That said, as Kneehole said, it heat-bonds better than almost any other plastic, creating a finished repair that is as strong as the original piece. This is how one bonds one piece of HDPE pipe to another - heat both pipe ends, pull them together and let cool, and it's like it was a single piece. there are HDPE pipes 5 feet in diameter out there that were bonded exactly that way and they are still leakproof decades later. HFT sells a plastic welding tool to make repairs to HDPE, don't know how well it works though.
 
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