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Discussion Starter #1
Hey gang,
We purchased this '07 T-dub with a mere 587 miles on it, about 7 months ago and, after some major work, got it resurrected and she runs like a top. But, the rear brakes don't like to be applied without at least some squealing. I've had the rear wheel off a time or two and, have had the hub and brakes apart to see what, if anything might be causing it. Nope, can't find anything but a nice looking drum and, the brakes are close to being new. I was thinking of maybe actually grooving those shoes in a diagonal cut. I don't have a clue if that would help, or hurt the rear braking. But, squealing is, for the most part, a very high frequency vibration and, just not sure what kind of steps it would take to eliminate it.

I've tried fairly hard stops with the rear brakes only and, well, that might help for a few times in the next stops but, the squealing always seems to return. It's not the end of the world and the bike still stops pretty darn good. But, it's almost embarresing when you're approaching a stop and other bikes are there or, peoples windows at the intersection are down etc. I suppose I could just buy a new set and try them. What's a new rear set cost, a few bucks?
Scott
 

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WD 40 sprayed liberally on pads....pow - very quiet!

I found using the rear brake more got rid of the squeal - prob cleaning the surfaces with friction.
 

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I gave an old set a light scuff with 600 grit and that helped for 1,000 miles when I sold it. Partly because I accidentally got grease on one of the pads. Stopped the squeal. I cleaned the drum but didn’t scuff it.
 

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If you don't want to take the drum apart etc; you can remove the brake lever - or- remove the rod connecting the brake lever to the brake drum.
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What are you looking down here for? I've already told you everything you need to know to guarantee no rear brake squealing!
Hit me; beat me; smack me with a frying pan! :)
 

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Take the rear brakes out and lube all the pivot points with your favorite thick no run grease. I usually use anti-seize. My brakes seemed to grab when it was damp outside and that also seemed to help decrease the grabbing also.
 

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The main issue is dirt and/or glazing of shoes.
Clean & scuff shoes with emory cloth or sandpaper.
De-glaze the friction surface inside the drum the same way. It should not be shiny.
Get rid of all dust & residue from entire system with compressed air. Or brake cleaner if you don't have air.
A careful lube job as Ken says is good but go real easy on lube, You don't want it to migrate to friction surfaces.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks guys. I will do a re-scuff to see if that alleviates the annoying squealing. Again, it's not the end of the world.
Scott
 

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Hey gang,
We purchased this '07 T-dub with a mere 587 miles on it, about 7 months ago and, after some major work, got it resurrected and she runs like a top. But, the rear brakes don't like to be applied without at least some squealing. I've had the rear wheel off a time or two and, have had the hub and brakes apart to see what, if anything might be causing it. Nope, can't find anything but a nice looking drum and, the brakes are close to being new. I was thinking of maybe actually grooving those shoes in a diagonal cut. I don't have a clue if that would help, or hurt the rear braking. But, squealing is, for the most part, a very high frequency vibration and, just not sure what kind of steps it would take to eliminate it.

I've tried fairly hard stops with the rear brakes only and, well, that might help for a few times in the next stops but, the squealing always seems to return. It's not the end of the world and the bike still stops pretty darn good. But, it's almost embarresing when you're approaching a stop and other bikes are there or, peoples windows at the intersection are down etc. I suppose I could just buy a new set and try them. What's a new rear set cost, a few bucks?
Scott
If your "other" suggestions do not work, this worked for me back in the Porshe and CB750 days. Get some pencil lead (office supply or drafting store), drill a few holes into the pad, insert the lead and break it off. It puts a small amount of lead (graphite) onto the contact surface but not so much to affect the braking.

Some pads have metal in the mix and naturally squeak. I've had to return to OEM pads on cars that did the same thing with aftermarket brakes.
 
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