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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
IMGP2790.JPG i'm breaking in a new motor and changed the oil and filter last night at the 100 mile mark. I decided to cut the filter open just to see how the break in is going. to my surprize the filter is spot less. I thought I would see something, is this a good sign or not so good. does it mean the engine is not breaking in properly??:confused:
 

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IMO...the Stock{metal} Filter is as good as they get.... 5500 on my 2014, original filter, Montezuma has well over 6000 on his 2015...Same original stock filter....I clean mine after every other oil change....and never had a problem.....

Much better than the cardboard/paper filters....not sure why anybody would think these things {the metal original} needs changed with each oil change...:eagerness:
 

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I believe that the oil flow is such that any debris trapped by the filter will show up on the exterior of the filter, resulting in only filtered oil on the inside of the filter.

Interesting picture, I've never seen the inside of one of these filters.
 

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Depends on your definition of "new motor" - if it's a factory standard new Yamaha out of the box, then "yes" - the filter is disgracefully clean, and you need to hand the bike over to one of us who will soon sort this out.

If this is a "re-built" engine, then "no" - looks good to me

Most of the crud the engine "barfs up" (thank you Fred) comes from running in all the individual components all at once - if this is a re-build, then you're looking good .......
 

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Its not what you can see but what you cant see hidden in the pleats of the filter media that is the concern. I cut open filters all the time at work, both oil and gas filters. With break-in of an engine it's the tiny little particals that you can't see that you want to flush out, some so small the filter doesn't stop them and they are suspended in the oil. Best thing you can do is change the oil after warming it up, pull that plug and get all the little gritties washed out. I am still running my original screen on my 2009 and after the first three oil changes at 100kms, then 300 kms, and finally at 500 kms there was no more flakes or silvery bits in the screen. Most I would think came from the gear box wearing in and now the oil/filter is clean as can be. If you simply just did a re-ringed and bearings, then you should not have had any flakes or heavy silver showing, and the fine particals from that kind of break-in will be in the filter but hard to see. If you drain your hot oil into a clear bowl (found in wife's baking cabinet) and let it sit for a day or so, you will see a grey sludge form on the bottom edges of the bowl. That will be what came from your break-in run and most will flow straight though most filters and remain in your oil so if you don't change your oil out on a new machine or a rebuild to the manufactors recommended time all that crud just continues to flow thru your oil galleries. One thing I dont like about the paper filters on the TW is that they can restrict the flow of oil and being that these little engines dont have a high pressure oil pump pushing it thru, guess what areas dont get oil as the flow gets restricted... the top end...cams/bearings. There is a reason the oil system comes with a washable screen and not a throw away canister (and its not cause Yamaha went "green") this is their way of maintaining high enough flow to ensure that the top end gets the oil it needs. So dont waste your money on paper filters, put that money into changing that oil more often and your TW will love you more.;)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
IMO...the Stock{metal} Filter is as good as they get.... 5500 on my 2014, original filter, Montezuma has well over 6000 on his 2015...Same original stock filter....I clean mine after every other oil change....and never had a problem.....

Much better than the cardboard/paper filters....not sure why anybody would think these things {the metal original} needs changed with each oil change...:eagerness:
thanks Hoot, but that wasn't what I was asking
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
I believe that the oil flow is such that any debris trapped by the filter will show up on the exterior of the filter, resulting in only filtered oil on the inside of the filter.

Interesting picture, I've never seen the inside of one of these filters.
that's not a tw filter. oil flows inside out on this bike
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Depends on your definition of "new motor" - if it's a factory standard new Yamaha out of the box, then "yes" - the filter is disgracefully clean, and you need to hand the bike over to one of us who will soon sort this out.

If this is a "re-built" engine, then "no" - looks good to me

Most of the crud the engine "barfs up" (thank you Fred) comes from running in all the individual components all at once - if this is a re-build, then you're looking good .......
this is brand new bike, v twin 250
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Its not what you can see but what you cant see hidden in the pleats of the filter media that is the concern. I cut open filters all the time at work, both oil and gas filters. With break-in of an engine it's the tiny little particals that you can't see that you want to flush out, some so small the filter doesn't stop them and they are suspended in the oil. Best thing you can do is change the oil after warming it up, pull that plug and get all the little gritties washed out. I am still running my original screen on my 2009 and after the first three oil changes at 100kms, then 300 kms, and finally at 500 kms there was no more flakes or silvery bits in the screen. Most I would think came from the gear box wearing in and now the oil/filter is clean as can be. If you simply just did a re-ringed and bearings, then you should not have had any flakes or heavy silver showing, and the fine particals from that kind of break-in will be in the filter but hard to see. If you drain your hot oil into a clear bowl (found in wife's baking cabinet) and let it sit for a day or so, you will see a grey sludge form on the bottom edges of the bowl. That will be what came from your break-in run and most will flow straight though most filters and remain in your oil so if you don't change your oil out on a new machine or a rebuild to the manufactors recommended time all that crud just continues to flow thru your oil galleries. One thing I dont like about the paper filters on the TW is that they can restrict the flow of oil and being that these little engines dont have a high pressure oil pump pushing it thru, guess what areas dont get oil as the flow gets restricted... the top end...cams/bearings. There is a reason the oil system comes with a washable screen and not a throw away canister (and its not cause Yamaha went "green") this is their way of maintaining high enough flow to ensure that the top end gets the oil it needs. So dont waste your money on paper filters, put that money into changing that oil more often and your TW will love you more.;)
my tw has a screen filter and on breaking it in the 1st oil change showed a reasonable amount of crude and each change after that was less and less until at about 1500 km it was clean. now I only clean the filter in the fall. this filter I am showing you is on a Yamaha v star 250, v twin. it has a paper filter and I changed it last night at 160 km. I haven't been babying it ( but not pushing hard ether) so I thought the filter should have had about the same amount of dirt in as the tw did. what does it mean, being so clean, is the motor not breaking in or is it build so well that it has no need to wear parts together. these v twins, like the tw, have a great reputation for lasting for ever. I am impressed with this filter, it is well built and only $6 from Canada motorcycle.
 

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Lol....thought you had a TW....that explains the filter... In that case, yeah it's all good - just do short hard runs and then let it cool, rinse and repeat.
 

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The TW’s, (like almost every Kawasaki in the 90’s), are built on the principle that they can just chuck the parts together at the factory and let them “get on” with each other (or not). In the case of the TW, this often results in a bit of metallic crap in the filter the first few times you do an oil change, then it all settles down, and you have a bike that will (almost) go on for ever. In the case of Kawasaki, this resulted in a 30% return rate for repair work under warrantee.

The TW is a simple two valve thumper, and built to a price — there was never any point in expecting such a bike to run like a Rolls Royce, and in taking this approach, in my opinion, the bike is a lot stronger simply because the tolerances are a lot “sloppier”. The bike is built to be rugged, practical, and designed to be put through every kind of abuse imaginable. A Mule will have more endurance and last longer than a race horse.

A Yamaha V star 250 V twin is built to be “smooth” — whole different ball game.

Whilst your V Star may not be a thoroughbred, it’s still more horse than mule ……….
 

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Nice autopsy on the V-Star filter. I am not very surprised to not see many shavings on break-in. Not everything is as crude as our motors.
The TW is the Kalashnikov of motorcycles (i.e.sloopy tolerances equate to moderate but reliable performance) while the V-Star is built to more silky tolerances like an H&K.
 
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thanks Hoot, but that wasn't what I was asking
Well Hell, I thought you were talking TWs and it's filter here....

Dismissed! :confused:
 
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All sort of company's out there that will perform tests on your oil. One sends in a sample of oil and you'll get
a report on the debris. On today's modern units with digital fuel management the oil stays so much cleaner than on old dinosaurs with carbs. That's one of the reasons cars run so much longer than back in the Stone Age.
 
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Discussion Starter #18
The TW’s, (like almost every Kawasaki in the 90’s), are built on the principle that they can just chuck the parts together at the factory and let them “get on” with each other (or not). In the case of the TW, this often results in a bit of metallic crap in the filter the first few times you do an oil change, then it all settles down, and you have a bike that will (almost) go on for ever. In the case of Kawasaki, this resulted in a 30% return rate for repair work under warrantee.

The TW is a simple two valve thumper, and built to a price — there was never any point in expecting such a bike to run like a Rolls Royce, and in taking this approach, in my opinion, the bike is a lot stronger simply because the tolerances are a lot “sloppier”. The bike is built to be rugged, practical, and designed to be put through every kind of abuse imaginable. A Mule will have more endurance and last longer than a race horse.

A Yamaha V star 250 V twin is built to be “smooth” — whole different ball game.

Whilst your V Star may not be a thoroughbred, it’s still more horse than mule ……….
good thing, I hate running the mule down the highway
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Nice autopsy on the V-Star filter. I am not very surprised to not see many shavings on break-in. Not everything is as crude as our motors.
The TW is the Kalashnikov of motorcycles (i.e.sloopy tolerances equate to moderate but reliable performance) while the V-Star is built to more silky tolerances like an H&K.
thanks Fred. I guess I won't worry about being too clean
 

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Grewen how do you like that bike, how's it handle? Any get up and go? Suspension?
 
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