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I have noticed my bathroom was extra hot this summer and noticed a wet spot on the wall and I touched it and the drywall was wet, so it had to be right behind my toilet I put a temporary clamp on it till I have time to fix it right I suck at drywall so I will have someone do it right I plan to sale this house in 22 month and having a house built in Prescott AZ. 10622234_10203476768671949_824363177_n.jpg on the hot water pipe.
 

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Oh the joys of home ownership, always something to fix. A pro drywall repair is a good idea with a sale contemplated. All my patches look like patches since texture is so hard to match. Much sympathy. As a starving college student renting I would have just thought it good magazine and t.p. storage.
 

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Not good! If what you had is a pin hole leak in the copper pipe above the connections then you have more to come. Copper often rots from inside out because of chemicals in the water or some sort of electrolysis condition. When you do the repair you will see the corroded inside part and know there will be more problems upcoming. Often times the repair causes more leaks right up the line unless you replace a lot of copper.

GaryL
 

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probably "copper" covering...youngest son{they just had the grandson #2} had the same last week...for the second time in a year....replacing it with pvc...but nice hole in the condo ceiling just in time for the baby....sucks for sure
 

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Good point Gary. I have client in slab-on-grade subdivision home whose hot water lines catastrophically leak under the slab foundation. Low-bid plumbing contractor for low bid subdivision developer omitted dialetric couplers in quite a few homes there. These are neccessary where pipes of dissimilar metal meet up.Many are failing there after about a ten year service life. Contractor is long gone leaving home owners with expensive re-plumbing starting at minimum of $15,000.
So if any of you contemplate a little DIY plumbing do not forget that without a diaeletric coupler installed where copper and a dissimilar metal join you will set up a galvanic cell where the copper is slowly electro-plated onto the Chrome/zinc/iron bath and kitchen fixtures. Eventually copper loss results in thin pipe walls and a subsequent leak. Tends to occur in hot water pipes first due to faster chemical process at higher temps.
 

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I have noticed my bathroom was extra hot this summer and noticed a wet spot on the wall and I touched it and the drywall was wet, so it had to be right behind my toilet I put a temporary clamp on it till I have time to fix it right I suck at drywall so I will have someone do it right I plan to sale this house in 22 month and having a house built in Prescott AZ. View attachment 9171 on the hot water pipe.

That is a bummer. It's not the plumbing that is the big problem, it's the wall. There is no quick fix for this one. If it was mine I would still fix it myself though. I would pull the toilet out remove all the drywall on the entire wall, replace the copper pipes and then put in new drywall. No small task, but if you hire this done there is going to be a loud sucking sound on your bank account.
 

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Water leak in the wall, that sucks. Nothing worse except sewer leak...

In looking at the picture, what is that red item on the pipe? Just curious...

And another question, does copper actually corrode such? I have never seen that before in the middle of a line. Yes, burst frozen pipes, damaged pipes from installation and the odd screw or nail through the wall, but just sitting there???
 

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Water leak in the wall, that sucks. Nothing worse except sewer leak...

In looking at the picture, what is that red item on the pipe? Just curious...

And another question, does copper actually corrode such? I have never seen that before in the middle of a line. Yes, burst frozen pipes, damaged pipes from installation and the odd screw or nail through the wall, but just sitting there???

I agree, I have not seen corroded copper except in electrical circuits. The pipe must have been damaged. Maybe I would just repair the damaged spot and cover the hole with a nice piece of 1/8" masonite and paint it the color of the wall. If the buyer asks, just tell him it's an access entry for plumbing repairs. Some houses have those.
 

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Copper plumbing pipes can corrode for a few reasons. Hard water or water with certain minerals is often the culprit and there is also some systems that use the water pipes as electrical grounding points. This causes some form of electro chemical reaction that Fred seems to have a better handle on. My brothers home is plagued by pin hole leaks in the copper heat system. We are changing over to all PEX pipes as the leaks appear.

My copper pipes are 45 years old and in good shape but my neighbors are about the same age and he has pin hole leaks all the time.

GaryL
 

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I imagine that Arizona real estate laws require full disclosure from seller of any and all issues.If so perhaps best to have known issue fixed so it looks proffesionally done, declare leak and wall fixed and hope buyer doesn't ask about dry rot floor, sill plate and studs or potential for similar problems elsewhere in home.
 

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I imagine that Arizona real estate laws require full disclosure from seller of any and all issues.If so perhaps best to have known issue fixed so it looks proffesionally done, declare leak and wall fixed and hope buyer doesn't ask about dry rot floor, sill plate and studs or potential for similar problems elsewhere in home.



That makes sense. There should be full disclosure even if the law doesn't require it.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Not good! If what you had is a pin hole leak in the copper pipe above the connections then you have more to come. Copper often rots from inside out because of chemicals in the water or some sort of electrolysis condition. When you do the repair you will see the corroded inside part and know there will be more problems upcoming. Often times the repair causes more leaks right up the line unless you replace a lot of copper.

GaryL
It was a pinhole below a coupling and I am hoping it was just a bad piece or a nick in the pipe house was built in 1990, I am good at sweating pipe I did it for a few years doing A/C work but as Fred said Arizona real estate laws require full disclosure from seller of any and all issues. so I have decided to have a licensed contractor fix the pipe and drywall so I will Have documentation for the sale.
 

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It was a pinhole below a coupling and I am hoping it was just a bad piece or a nick in the pipe house was built in 1990, I am good at sweating pipe I did it for a few years doing A/C work but as Fred said Arizona real estate laws require full disclosure from seller of any and all issues. so I have decided to have a licensed contractor fix the pipe and drywall so I will Have documentation for the sale.
Ask the pro to see the cut out piece of pipe. It will show if the pipes are rotting.

GaryL
 
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Yes, copper corrodes. Ever seen a shiny new penny? Ever seen a penny that wasn't shiny? The difference is corrosion. Ever seen an old building with a black or black/green metal roof? Those are copper roofs, and the black and black/green is corrosion. What Fred is talking about is electrolysis, not corrosion. A weak electric current cause the copper pie to lose atoms by screwing with the valance electrons, which then electrostatically bond to the steel or iron pipes. "Show chrome" plating is actually 3 layers on the base metal: copper, nickel, chrome. The copper fills big scratches, nickel is a self-leveling surface, and the chrome provides corrosion protection for the nickel. Each layer is placed via electrolytic means. You can do this at home with a small battery charger, a penny, and whatever you want copper plated, or gold plated, or ... . It is easy and fun.

GaryL is right, since the water is inside a copper pipe, if an electric current is present the pipe will lose atoms from its inner diameter, until there inner diameter meets the outer diameter, and then it leaks.
 
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