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On December the 4th, I stopped smoking after nearly 50 years

After a couple of false starts at giving up in the recent past, I got onto a plane bound for Malta for a couple of weeks, and simply left the cigarettes behind. I think the change of scenery for those first two weeks helped a lot, and by the end of that time I’d given up on nicotine patches in favour of vaping (which I’ll admit I went out there fully equipped to do) – even vaping at 6 (which is low) combined with the patches at 10 (you’re supposed to start out at 25), the combination of the two could often result in a headache

Now, as I write this, I “vape” at 6 or 9 according to my mood, and the patches stay in there their box. I’ve discovered that I can stop vaping for an hour or so, but the patches nicotine content was more or less relentless, whether you wanted or needed it or not

At the tender age of 60, my motivation for doing this was as a result of being “generally unfit”, resulting in increased respiration at the slightest exercise – combine that with smoking 20 roll ups a day, and you’ll quickly get the idea -my lungs were labouring getting up hills. Now my respiration rate still increases, but as least the air is getting through, (the “unfit” bit I’ll deal with in due course)

As for avoiding the “Big C”, it’s been my experience that if you’re going to get it, you still will. I’ve seen too many people taken down (non-smokers, and those who have given up years ago) to believe that what I am doing will affect my chances of that happening. – but my arteries will probably appreciate the difference

My reasons for writing this, is to elicit comments and advice from those who have successfully given up smoking in the past, and hopefully to help those who consider doing so in future. It’s been my experience that it’s far from being about the nicotine, there are too many options for “replacement” of that particular singular “addiction” – it’s more complicated than that

Today in particular, I’ve seriously “wanted” a ciggy three times, despite my body having enough nicotine to keep it going. But I draw on the memory of my difficulty in getting up hills, my (now old cough – it’s history), and after a few minutes, I’m through it. I know that if I have a single ciggy now, that will lead to two, and to my eventual loss of willpower. It’s a battle, but it’s one I will eventually win – perhaps simply because it’s one I “need” to win

Any and all comments welcome – whether you currently a smoker, or given up in the past, or even someone whose never smoked – it’s all good

“A problem shared is a problem halved” ………
 

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Good for you Purple!
It is easy to cheat and lose progress if trying to progressively wean yourself from the nicotine habit.
With the help of Chantrix I quit successfully after two attempts. First time I permitted myself to gradually decrease as the drug instructions permitted, then I cheated and resumed smoking.
Next time I went "cold turkey", i.e. quit totally with no progressive decrease in nicotine dosage. That was five years ago and not a single cigarette since.
Wishing you total success. Maintaining willpower is difficult if you allow yourself to sneak a cigarette or vape now and then but you already know that.
 

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Thanks Fred – I’m hoping that eventually giving up vaping will be a lot simpler, even if it’s just because your only dealing with one “addiction”, and you’ll have done it before …….
 

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The change in environment like the holiday in Malta helps. I was almost successful on an Hawaiian vacation where smoking in public is pretty much a criminal act. Might have worked if I just stayed another week but what really worked was the drug Chantrix which seemed to break the craving from the chemical dependency on nicotine.
Perhaps be brave and loose the vaping before you back-slide into the old habit? Just think that smoking makes you part of a dying breed. Not many people smoke tobacco around here anymore, they likely smoke legal marijuana now.:rolleyes:
 

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Good on you Purple, I quit 11 years ago and have not had one since! I also had to give up coffee at the same time as I never had a smoke without a coffee or a coffee without a smoke.........:(
I also gave up alcohol and lost 55 pounds at the same time! The key for me was that I wanted to quit smoking, not because my spouse was making or trying to force me too.........
I have an occassional drink and still eat the fat around my bbq'd steak but what I really, really CRAVE is coffee and I have not had one cup in 11 years! The thought of smoking a cigarette today is repulsive and I used to smoke half a pack a day and did for many years.
You will do it brother, surely something like a simple cigarette isn't going to win this one, right?
 

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Good luck on your effort to quit, I've heard that giving up cigarettes is harder than quitting heroin.
Since I've never smoked I wouldn't know. And I see these vaping stores everywhere I assume that it is an electronic cigarette?
 

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i took champax when i was having a bout of phenomena ten days later i didnt have the urge to even smoke ....ten years later ... still not smokein... funny thing when u cant breath anymore smokeins no fun, was trying to quit for a long time... and being a welder was not the best choice of trades.. these days feel fairly good with about 50% of lungs left.... u have to over come it in the brain...
 

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Good for you Purple. I have years of vaping experience if you ever have questions. I’m no expert, but I’ve done lots of homework and found stuff that works for my wife and I. Not sure about what products you have available to you but two universal things I suggest:

Find a good juice supplier that you know isn’t adding crazy things for flavor or shelf life.

Only use the charger that came with your cig or one that you know is compatible.
 

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Well done, my friend.

Competitive video games are legit; kids are making millions doing it. There are close to 150 million active players in the main game that I used to play. I am a competitive video game addict currently in remission (have been in and out over the past few years). Yes, you read that right. Yes, it's a real thing (a process addiction, much like gambling). Yes, it's dumb as hell. Substitutes for my addiction are non-competitive games, television shows, and books. I have tried all manner of solutions, and the one that has worked best for me is probably cold-turkey (by somehow forcibly and completely removing access). I know that this method is more problematic with a chemical addiction. Still, don't underestimate the damaging potential of psychological addiction-withdrawal.

What I will share that I think could help with limiting/removing any addiction is my ideas about HOW to limit or restrict access. On the whole, I would say that one needs to get creative with this stuff. There is always some way to restrict or completely remove access. One of the things I've done with video games is to do a password change for my accounts. When inputting the new password, I would use a random-number generator, and then copy and paste without looking. I also created a new email account and did the same for both the name of the account and the password associated with it, then switched my video-game-account's associated email to that one. Another thing I've done is to intentionally get my game-account permanently banned by breaking in-game rules.

Something else I've found helpful is to frequently ask myself how I really feel about things. What do I REALLY want here: do I actually want to quit this completely, or just reduce it (is a reduction without complete restriction ACTUALLY possible?); are there suitable substitutes, and will I be happy doing those things instead/will the substitutes be addicting/problematic or no? etc. I've determined that non-competitive video games are FAR less addicting to me (trying to become world champion is a hyper-focused, obsessive pursuit indeed!), and seem to be reasonable substitutes. I have currently gone about two months without any competitive gaming.

I might suggest finding a hard-line way to restrict your access (either partially or completely, or progressively or whatever you deem best before starting). You could, for example, sign a contract with another person who is close to you and have them agree to, like, steal your TW and hide it from you for a predetermined period of time, if they ever catch you smoking. Extreme? Yea, of course...but stuff like this can help.

Oh yes, also, I would encourage anyone with an addiction to NEVER stop trying to overcome it. Promise to yourself that you will keep going back to trying to fix your problem(s), no matter how many times, or how badly you fail. Even if you continue to try and fail for the entire rest of your life, you will probably still be better off than if you just permanently give up and submit to the addiction.
 

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I quit cold turkey back in May and it was very difficult for the first few weeks. Honestly I quit because for some reason this spring I went out hiking and for the first time I felt like I couldn't breath climbing up a hill. The cravings after I quit were harsh but they go away significantly as time passes and currently I could care less about having one. Just keep reminding yourself of why you quit but as long as your still using some sort of nicotine replacement it will continue to be difficult.

Months after I quit I signed up through my work for their quit program to get some insurance money back and I had to use the "quit with Nancy program" which has lots of good info in it. I think there were 4 DVDs in all that explained a lot and had some really helpful advice. Anyways I still have the DVDs and if you want I can mail it off to you or anyone else who is serious about quitting as long as you live in the continental us so it doesn't cost me an arm and a leg.
 

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Three years ago this past August, after being a 2 pack a day smoker starting back in Vietnam in 1970, I tried a "vape" for the very first time... it was filled with a grape tasting oil at 12% which was 1/2 of what I was getting at the time with my grape flavored little filter cigars...

I had tried everything including patches on numerous occassions, chantix a couple times, and attending peer groups at a local hospitol..

Nothing positive ever happened previously.. However, after taking my first try of the Vape device my smoking days were over...

That is now to the degree that I almost feel sick around cigarette smoke.... I'm currently down to 6 mg of nicotein as I hit the vape device maybe up to 10 times each day, and no one has been allowed to smoke in my Tundra nor beautiful ole' 73 Bronco in over 2 years now.

With all of that "Good" being said, I do need to also say that this past July the VA hosp. in Portland Or. discovered a small area of cancer in my left lung while having a yearly CT to check on the progress of my COPD. :eek::(

This area of newly discovered cancer will start recieving radiation in Feb. ( radiation is due to the fact that I'm not a good surgery prospect.) That being my case.. I would still emphathatically say IMO, it's never to late to quit... ;)

Gene aka: excalibur
 

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Way to go Purple! you don't loose until you stop trying. i smoked on and off for 40 years, mostly on with a few 5 and 7 year breaks, but could never quit. so in 2005 i went and talked to my doctor and he prescribed an anti depressant to be taken for 30 days while i still smoked. after the 30 days, he said to stop the anti depressant and the smoking. i haven't had or wanted one since. now the extra 15 lbs is something else
 

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Grewen that’s an interesting method.

Purple I wish you much success. I never smoked, but have many friends and relatives over the years that were able to quit. Also I have several friends and aquainteces that we’re alcholics. In my limited experience the only quit method that worked for both adictions was going cold turkey. If you are vaping nicotine you are still partaking and have NOT quit just reduced your intake. It may be easier on your body and mind to go cold turkey from a lower level, but you are at risk for a major relapse. Just make up your mind not to touch any nicotine ever again which you have done and ride out the pain. Personally I would think of all the money I have wasted making the big tabaco companies rich and how they and I have abused me physically and shorted the most valuable thing I have which is life it self. This is probably the motivation that prevented ME from ever smoking. Maybe that can be an added motivation for YOU if it not already is. Anyway I know you will succeed. Thanks for sharing best of sucess in your most difficult endeavor.
 

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A friend of mine smoked for years, 20+ He wanted a new boat and could not afford it. He took a look at what he spent on cigs a year and it was close to $6000 a year. He then quit cold turkey and saved that money and bought that new boat and hasn't looked back since. I'll bet that the money spent on cigs a year by most will buy a new TW no problem. I will say I have never smoked but grew up in a smokers house. Both parents, and paid the price with lots of ailments because of it.
5 years out of the house all my problems were gone. I eventually lost both parents to their smoking habits, dad at 51 and mom at 72( her parents both lived into their 90's) both too soon. Will power over something is a tough ride, but I can see how cold turkey could be the way to go. Good luck Purple and keep at it, seeing the problem is the first step.
 

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A pack of smokes or a can of chew a day for 40 years... I am coming up on 1 year free and clear! I tried everything, cold turkey, vaping, chantix, patch, hypnosis, acupuncture, and even participated in UW Medical study where I wore a special watch and listened to a CD with subliminal messaging. None of it worked. Then I read a book, Allen Carrs Easy Way to Stop Smoking. It was recommended by a couple friends who swore by it. I followed the directions and when I put out that last smoke, I was done. No upset, no withdrawals, none of the shit I was accustomed to... I was just done.

So, no matter what, don't give up and I would highly recommend reading the book. It's not that expensive and made a difference for me.

Happy New Year!
 

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I was listening to Howard Stern interview Rod Stewart and he said he had quit smoking 20 years ago but at one point he put something in his mouth and Howard asked what iwas like gum or something and he said yes it's nicotene gum he has been chewing for the 20 years since he quit smoking. I'venever smoked but that stuck in my mind that he still needed the nic in any form I guess. I'm sure it's still way healthier than smoking
 
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