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Not sure where I heard this, but to paraphrase, "a Jeep will inevitably get stuck, or break down; it will just be farther from civilization when it does."

My love-hate relationship with Jeeps goes back 60 years when I bought my first with my paper route earnings. It was a Ford, manufactured in Dallas, and likely sold stateside as surplus after WWII but from its condition I thought it was a veteran on the D-Day invasion. In its scant dozen years it had been over the mountain and down the valley without regard for roads or even trails. By the time I got it the bumpers had been replaced with sections of railroad track and hardly anything worked right except the engine. The clutch would not disengage completely so I had to start it in first gear then feel my way through the rest. Reverse was a non option - I learned never to drive or park where that would be needed. Obviously could never have passed any sort of inspection, but I wasn't licensed anyway so kept off the roads as much as possible.

By the time I could drive legally dad had bought an FC-170 with a stake bed and I made deliveries after school. Ugly but functional. I got the bug again living in California in the 60's but did not have the money. I eventually bought a new Cherokee Chief in 76. I managed to bury it to the belly pans in a soggy pasture in site of my house before I had even received my permanent plates. It later developed issues with the front drive shaft CV joints and knocked a hole in the transmission case I patched, semi successfully, with JB weld. Then there were missing teeth on the flywheel starter ring which occasionally necessitated crawling underneath to turn the engine a few degrees with a screwdriver. I bought a used 77 pick-up, same color and trim and even the keys were identical, so I would have a back-up vehicle and possibly interchangeable parts, but that was hit or miss, especially the electronic ignition, which always seemed to fail when my wife was driving alone. I traded the pair for a 90s Pioneer, but it seemed so frail and gutless I did not keep it long.

The next 20 years I drove Ford trucks, some 4WD, some diesel, and a Explorer Sport Trac, and did not have any major issues with any.

I'm back with my current Jeep Liberty, reminds me of the Chief, but it has been very dependable. It's 2WD so am less tempted to go over the mountain and down the valley. I have the TW for that. I keep looking for Jeep to finally reintroduce the pick-up, but keeps getting pushed back and may not be available before the state takes away my license.
 

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I have owed 3 Jeeps, all Wranglers, 2 door, manual shift, no fancy BS. So consistently for almost 25 years.
A CJ, TJ and I think they call the current models JK's?
I bought it outright after the lease expired as there wasn't much difference between the 2013 and what was being offered as the 2016. Waiting for them to come out with the Wrangler pick-up... someday. Alway loved the old "Comanche's" if ya remember them? That's a collector vehicle now if you can find one in good shape.

Probably one of the ridiculously least depreciated vehicles I've ever owned. Have never had a problem with any of mine other than changing tires every 50,000 miles.

IMG_4736.JPG


IMG_7002.JPG
 

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Q. What does Jeep stand for

Answer

Jeep is not an acronym -- it's an actual word. It started out as the name of a character in the Popyey cartoon, Eugene the Jeep. Eugene could only say one word -- Jeep. "Jeep" ended up being the trademarked name for a vehicle used in WWII. Why the vehicle was called a "jeep" is clouded in mystery...

From Wikipedia:

There are many explanations of the origin of the word "jeep," all of which have proven difficult to verify. The most widely held theory is that the military designation of GP begat the term "Jeep" and holds that the vehicle bore the designation "GP" (for "Government Purposes" or "General Purpose"), which was phonetically slurred into the word jeep. However, an alternate view launched by R. Lee Ermey, on his television series Mail Call, disputes this, saying that the vehicle was designed for specific duties, and was never referred to as "General Purpose" and it is highly unlikely that the average jeep-driving GI would have been familiar with this designation. The Ford GPW abbreviation actually meant (G for government use, P to designate its 80-inch (2,000 mm) wheelbase and W to indicate its Willys-Overland designed engine).

Many, including Ermey, suggest that soldiers at the time were so impressed with the new vehicles that they informally named it after Eugene the Jeep, a character in the Popeye cartoons created by E. C. Segar. Eugene the Jeep was Popeye's "jungle pet" and was "small, able to move between dimensions and could solve seemingly impossible problems."[1]


It's an easy leap from "GPW" to "GP" to Jeep. Don't overthink it.
by Old Enough To Know on Jun 28, 2016.
You are all wrong, J.E.E.P. is an acronym. it stands for:
Joint all wheel drive
Emergency
Evacuation
of Personnel vehicle.
Being in the military for 32 years and working in the military motor pool for half that time one gets familiar with all nomenclature..
by Major Dave (US Army ret) on Jul 19, 2016.
I heard that during the second world war army vehicles kept breaking down so the American army used broken down vehicle parts to build a usable vehicle naming it the J.E.E.P ,which stands for JUST.ENOUGH.ESSENTIAL.PARTS....true or not????
by Mark on Oct 25, 2016.
Actually mark was quite close, it's actually Just Enough Equipment Parts , it is an acronym though
by Mike on Jan 31, 2017.
 

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I've had 3 Jeeps and all served well
2001 TJ new, which I gave to #2 daughter in 2004, who drove it well past 200,000 miles with relatively minor repairs (mainly windshields and radiators) in Colorado.
2004 Liberty, which served well but was replaced at age 2-3 years, due to a hail storm at our Arizona ranch.
2003 TJ, purchased at age 10 (see under the hood photo). I went through it well, replacing belt, hoses, bulbs, relays, etc, then had zero issues.
None were as economical (or haul as much) as my 2009 Toyota Tacoma 4WD...which has been replaced by a Nissan Frontier crew cab SV 4WD.
All good memories, except the Toyota also went to daughter #2, circa 2012 and she totaled it. Wish Toyota still made a standard cab Tacoma 4WD.

01 Wrangler at ranch 15 Dec 2001.jpg
03 Jeep Wrangler under the hood.JPG
Jeep parking.jpg
Wheeler Peak, Great Basin, June 2014.JPG
2009 Toyota Tacoma Tacoma 4WD.JPG
 

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More memory lane photos
Peaceful.JPG
V8 under the hood.jpg
2007 Dodge Ram 1500 SLT.JPG
 
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