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Just ordered a set off Amazon;
JIS set
I've since received my set and have had ample time to use them. These are great! They fit my screws and I never realized that any phillips or JIS would fit this well. Worth the money and since they break down, can be stowed with other tools in my fanny pack when on the trail.
 

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I've since received my set and have had ample time to use them. These are great! They fit my screws and I never realized that any phillips or JIS would fit this well. Worth the money and since they break down, can be stowed with other tools in my fanny pack when on the trail.
Ski, I think I'm going to get your set as well for packing on the bike. So you are happy with the quality? Does it state the country of origin on the package? I got the same for my buddy and he seems equally impressed. Thanks man. P
 

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YUP, not only made in Japan, but marketed for Japan as all the packaging is written in Japanese.
Great quality, I've now used them on every JIS fastener I have around my place and the drivers look as good as new.
 

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Let’s look at this in more detail …..

Theoretically, you are staring a JIS screw, and wondering how to approach it. If you have a Phillips head driver, then with extreme caution. Once the initial point of resistance is reached, the Phillips head will skid out, wrecking the head of the JIS screw

So, then you try one of those new fangled (circa ‘70’s) “Posi-drive” jobbies, which introduces another set of catch points on said screw in a star pattern. Now we’re talking, as long as that JIS screw is only a little bit more than hand tight that is. A much better fit, but is it good enough ? – it certainly feels like it

Then you take a Japanese production line, fully automated, where the production tools take the JIS screw to its correct torque in one smooth robotic move. No room for error, the screw has withstand the force of the driver used with zero slip. Sure, it only has to happen “once”, but it has to happen reliably every time, hence the evolution of the JIS standard

The difference between Posi-drive and JIS may seem small, but look at it this way. Attack a JIS screw with a Phillips, and it will skid the head after , say, 50% force. The Posi-drive, perhaps up to 80%, but with the JIS head, suggest 90% (no driver head is perfect after the screw has been sitting there for a decade or so)

And if you need to “whump” it with an impact hammer, you’ll need all the help you can get

With the increased use of power tools, something the Japanese production lines have been doing for years, comes the need for increased “accuracy”. A friend of mine (my old boss), asked me how I managed to screw thing together using a drill without any problems – I replied “Make sure you have a tight fit, make sure you are square on, and just go in slowly and steadily”. Selection and angle is everything – “awareness over confidence” – this is the philosophy behind JIS

I grew up smacking the crap out those screw in the seventies, how I didn’t crack the cases was a miracle, but it was a “right of passage” back then. Ten minutes getting most of the case screws out, then three hours hammering on the remaining one. But times change, and so does the way we approach things

The pre-fix “PZ” denotes Posi-drive, and while that may well suffice, you could do better

JIS Screwdriver Bit Set and Driver 7 Pc For Japanese Industrial Standard Screws | eBay

How you approach this is up to you, but personally, I’d get both the ones Ski has proposed, and the one’s I’ve mentioned above. Between the two, you are likely to find a solution ……..
 

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Let’s look at this in more detail …..

Theoretically, you are staring a JIS screw, and wondering how to approach it. If you have a Phillips head driver, then with extreme caution. Once the initial point of resistance is reached, the Phillips head will skid out, wrecking the head of the JIS screw

So, then you try one of those new fangled (circa ‘70’s) “Posi-drive” jobbies, which introduces another set of catch points on said screw in a star pattern. Now we’re talking, as long as that JIS screw is only a little bit more than hand tight that is. A much better fit, but is it good enough ? – it certainly feels like it

Then you take a Japanese production line, fully automated, where the production tools take the JIS screw to its correct torque in one smooth robotic move. No room for error, the screw has withstand the force of the driver used with zero slip. Sure, it only has to happen “once”, but it has to happen reliably every time, hence the evolution of the JIS standard

The difference between Posi-drive and JIS may seem small, but look at it this way. Attack a JIS screw with a Phillips, and it will skid the head after , say, 50% force. The Posi-drive, perhaps up to 80%, but with the JIS head, suggest 90% (no driver head is perfect after the screw has been sitting there for a decade or so)

And if you need to “whump” it with an impact hammer, you’ll need all the help you can get

With the increased use of power tools, something the Japanese production lines have been doing for years, comes the need for increased “accuracy”. A friend of mine (my old boss), asked me how I managed to screw thing together using a drill without any problems – I replied “Make sure you have a tight fit, make sure you are square on, and just go in slowly and steadily”. Selection and angle is everything – “awareness over confidence” – this is the philosophy behind JIS

I grew up smacking the crap out those screw in the seventies, how I didn’t crack the cases was a miracle, but it was a “right of passage” back then. Ten minutes getting most of the case screws out, then three hours hammering on the remaining one. But times change, and so does the way we approach things

The pre-fix “PZ” denotes Posi-drive, and while that may well suffice, you could do better

JIS Screwdriver Bit Set and Driver 7 Pc For Japanese Industrial Standard Screws | eBay

How you approach this is up to you, but personally, I’d get both the ones Ski has proposed, and the one’s I’ve mentioned above. Between the two, you are likely to find a solution ……..
Thanks for that awesome anecdotal story Purple. As I mentioned above, the Sunflag JIS drivers I bought are built to that original JIS designation of B4633, which ended as a standard in Japan in 2008. But Ski's later tool looks useful as well and is only another $15 so worth it, esp. if one can pack it with the TW. I plan to try both as time goes on and will report back. I'm just delighted that there was a reason why Phillips always seemed hard to use in high-torque situations. I've thought for years that I was just missing something about technique that I could not figure out. This whole post is just so helpful!
 
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