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Discussion Starter #1
I'm not only new here, but new to riding on two wheels as well. You guys informed me well while making my choice to get a TW, thank you. Though it wasn't much of a choice, as there doesn't seem to be anything else like the TW out there.



My name is Eli, and I'm in Florida. I just picked up my 2013 TW yesterday, and put about a mile on it last night riding in the woods near my house.



I'm learning to ride with this bike, and I'd welcome any tips along the way. I have already suffered my first crash, into a barbed wire fence. A little blood, a sore knee, and a couple of scratches on the bike. But I'm thrilled to have it. We've got soft sand and rock roads here for me to learn on while I get my license. I eventually want to commute to town, about 25 miles away, and of course play in the woods with my TW.
 

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I'm learning to ride with this bike, and I'd welcome any tips along the way. I have already suffered my first crash, into a barbed wire fence. A little blood, a sore knee, and a couple of scratches on the bike.


Welcome! Take it from an old barbed wire veteran, go slow until you learn each specific trail, and NEVER assume that a wire gate is REALLY open and not just one wire at neck level!!!!
Old trails have the possibility of just having newer un-flagged barbed wire strung right across them...Don't ask me how I know.




PS, sent you a PM with my story.
 

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Congratulations and welcome from one Floridian to another! If you have never ridden or little time in the saddle I would highly recommend you take the BRC (Basic Rider Course) offered by the MSF (Motorcycle Safety Foundation). Legally to ride in Florida you must attend this course to receive your motorcycle endorsement (license) but more importantly you will be taught life saving skills and strategies that apply to real life situations. Riding on two wheels with limited protection is a lot different from driving your car. From correct braking, proper corning, ability to swerve to avoid an object, maneuvering over objects and how to operate your motorcycle at slow speeds. These are just a few of the skills you will be taught and get to practice! I know as I teach the BRC ... and know you will not be sorry for the investment in time and money the course requires. There are many schools out there offering a variety of times to suit your schedule. Best of all they will usually have a TW for you to ride in the class (just call ahead and ask). If you should need additional info feel free to PM me. Sorry for the rant but I truly believe that such courses do save lives. Ride safe, ride alert.
 

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Congratulations and welcome. I will echo that taking the MSF could very well be the difference between life and death, as there are so many things a beginner simply doesn't think of and nobody out in the world thinks to tell you. The MSF will tell you that stuff, and sooner or later, it will probably save you from, at the least, a very serious injury.



Now, read up about add-ons and proper gear. Focus on the gear first, but a good skidplate is pretty dandy if you're offroad much. The rest will follow.



Let's see some pics of the bike.
 

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Welcome, Like Rocky said, trails have a way of changing so best to scout it out before opening up that throttle and tearing around. I've come up on logs, cement chunks, branches, etc..... One time I went over this hump that I had been over plenty of times and the back side was washed out and about a 3 foot hole was waiting for me. How I didn't go flying over handlebars is a mystery but lets say I had a very high pitched voice for about 15 minutes as I rested nearby.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Heh, well, I knew the fence was there. It was on my own property. There was a little hump in the trail and I got jerked back and forth or up and down... and somehow I yanked the throttle. My brain told me to just pull the clutch, guess my hand didn't respond. Next thing I knew I was in the fence.



I've ridden ATVs my whole life, and I swear this whole twist throttle thing (versus a thumb lever on an ATV) feels terribly counter intuitive. My motorcycle riding dad assures me that it is better, but just takes getting used to. Hopefully that'll happen sooner rather than later.



About the BRC, I do indeed plan on taking it.



Thanks for the welcome guys.
 

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Congrats on the new T-DUB! You have been bitten!!!



Muhahahahahahahaah!!!!!!!!!!!!!!



I know I have, and I'm driving my wife crazy! She's just jealous I have a new lady in my life!
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Welcome to the forum....but I must offer my sincere apologies that you live in Flordia.




Bart
Once you get past the world class weirdos, voting scandals, flatness, extreme heat & humidity, and hurricanes, its a great place. Well... most of the time. Hah.



Thanks for the welcomes, I'm afraid I have indeed been bitten.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Wow, you nailed it!! LOL. I spent 7 loooooong years in south Florida, counting the days until I could leave.



Bart
South Florida, yeah, I grew up in Miami. I hated to leave it as a younger man. I'd never go back for anything longer than a visit now.
 

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I couldn't be more supportive in taking the Motorcycle Safety Courses. I had over 100000 miles under my belt on various motorcycles when I took the advanced MSF course. I found it informative, giving sound basis for some of the things we do while riding. It is the reflex habits that it will teach you that are most important, for that emergency situation.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I couldn't be more supportive in taking the Motorcycle Safety Courses. I had over 100000 miles under my belt on various motorcycles when I took the advanced MSF course. I found it informative, giving sound basis for some of the things we do while riding. It is the reflex habits that it will teach you that are most important, for that emergency situation.
Thanks!



I'll be happy when I have 1,000 miles under my belt.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Took my first ride last night, about 10 miles through the woods. Got a little hemmed in by downed trees and cables across gates, but I must say it was fun. Perhaps the most fun I've had with a vehicle in a while, and it cost so much less than all the money I've spent on making my cars more fun. If only I'd figured this out years ago.



Anyway, here's a poor quality pic from my first ride.



 
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