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Discussion Starter #1
I live in Orlando FL, and I just got my motorcycle licence. My 17 year old friend convinced me I should, so we took the class. I'd never been on a motorcycle in my life, but somehow I managed to pass with flying colors(got -5 pts for conservative speed in corners though). The teachers were awesome.



I've been doing some research and I've come across the TW200, which seems like an ideal learning bike. I am well versed in automotive engineering technology, so I understand how motorcycles work from a technical standpoint, but I really don't know what's out there or what's good when it comes to different models of motorcycles.



I need some educated advice from people who do know, which is why I registered and posted.



The TW200 sounds pretty indestructible, and it seems to have a huge following. I was also looking at the other Yamaha dual purpose bikes, because I like the look of a naked bike. The WR250X sounds ideal, except for the seat height. I'm only 5'6" so it sounds way too high for me. The The FZ8 is a beautiful machine, but I'm not sure if that'd be too much machine for me, or even the 600cc superbike.



I've read that the TW200 only has about 16bhp, but that heavy people can ride it. I'm only 150lbs, so the Buell Blast we did the class on accelerated pretty fast for me. That's the only motorcycle I've ever been on, so I've got nothing to compare it to.



What do you all think I ought to do about a first motorcycle? TW200 a good choice?
 

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The TW is an excellent first bike. After about 5 months of research I bought my first bike back in Nov and it was a used 2009 TW200 already outfitted with some nice extras. It's rock simple, as some are apt to say, and that's really accurate. It's easy to ride and handles quite well.



The XT250 or XT225(out of prod? so maybe used)is an alternate option. The XT250 is a slight bit heavier with less than an inch more seat height. I don't think the modest power increase is really worth the more than $600 price diff though. Oh that money also covers the addition of a rear disc brake. It is easier to get tires for since they are standard sizes. To me that's pretty much its only advantage. I also really like the fat tire look so the XT vs TW was a no-brainer for me.



The one other bike that I did consider was a Kawi Super Sherpa 250. It is pretty much Kawasaki's answer to the XT250 but is a few hundred cheaper. It's even got a 6 speed gear box. If I ever decide to get another dual-sport small displacement thumper this would be my second bike for sure.



In the end I just fell in love with the little TW's look and feel. Not to mention the community of riders. I haven't seen any pictures of the guys around here foaming at the mouth but I'm pretty sure some of them are rabid! Join us! I think you'll like the bike!



Byte
 

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This is your first bike, not your last. Whatever you do, don't tie yourself down to payments and full coverage insurance on your first bike. Odds are 100:1 you'll want something else as the various types of bikes and riding become more apparent to you.



A TW would be an excellent first bike. Cheap to buy. Cheap and easy to maintain. No bad habits other than the crap chain. Easy to ride. TWs are honest motorcycles, they do what you tell them to do. No surprises, like a 600 crotch rocket would provide if you grabbed just a bit too much throttle (over backwards) or a bit too much brake (over frontwards). Shop around for a good used TW, put on a decent chain, ride it 10,000 miles, then buy yourself a bigger/faster/cooler motorcycle. The skin you save will be your own. When you do buy another bike, you'll probably want to keep the TW, anyway. They are really that much fun.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the replies. The XT250 sounds pretty good too. I really do like the style of the TW200. I'll keep doing more research and try to test ride both of them soon.



Are there any more negatives about these bikes, or things I need to look out for? I didn't realize the chains weren't good on them.
 

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Keep you eyes open you can pick up a cheap low miles TW, a good first bike or like me a great other bike, after riding for 49 years.
 

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the tw is a great bike! i live outside of a town named sierra vista in a little town called tombstone. the commute is around 13 miles,city limits to my house. it does really good! the speed limit is 55 and i can keep up easy, i can get up to around 73mph if im full throttle. it handles really nicely! i live with my grandpop and we own around 50 (collector) bikes and this is the one he is starting me out on! he is a very exp. rider and knows alot, so if he bought this one for me to start i trust his good judgement! the bike keeps up on everyday traffic like a champ, and wins the stoplight drag races with ease. when im on a open road with others i barley ever get passed! the seat makes yo lean a bit foreword but i put a stearns seat cover on it and it pretty much makes up for the angle. its a good handleing bike! my nxt bike is going to be a 1999 klr 650 we have sitting around, then a ktm superduke 990 that he just recently bought, then *hopefully* someday his hyabusa 1300. im only 17 so the transitions will be overtime but im looking forward! but for now the tw is perfectly fine for me!
 

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The tw is a great bike to learn on but since I spend most of my time on trails I also picked up a klx 140 which is even easier to ride and slide so if you want to learn on the dirt the smaller the bike the faster you will learn.
 

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I am actually going from a 500cc cruiser (top speed 105mph) down to my TW. In fact, when I took the motorcycle class, I was on a TW, and it left a lasting impression on me. I purchased the cruiser before getting my license, so that was my own fault. I rode the cruiser for a couple of seasons, and last summer, because I was having so many issues with the cruiser and because I never could get the TW out of my mind, I purchased a new 2009. I have also decided that I am getting rid of the cruiser and am just going to have the TW for a while. Sure, I want a cruiser still, but since I purchased the TW, the cruiser gets absolutely no attention now. Get yourself a TW, I don't think you will be disappointed.



Dan
 

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TW was the first motorcycle I've ever had. It inspires confidence because of it's ability to forgive the rider in case of mistakes, namely the weight of the bike and your ability to keep it upright. It holds its resale value so if you get one and ride it and learn on it you could upgrade later with little loss. Or just keep it forever if it suits your needs.



I'd recommend a motorcycle safety course to build your confidence, learn great pointers and lessons by the guys who have ridden for years, and get a reduction on your insurance costs. Unless that class you took was the motorcycle safety course? I may not have read your post correctly.
 

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First bike for me. It's very easy to learn on, I've been on my dad's 1200 Sportster and my brother's 650 Intruder, but this is definitely an easy bike to start riding around (great thing is, you can even get used to it riding offroad
). Overall, I'm glad with the decision. You can go anywhere, get amazing fuel economy, plus have the right of telling your friends with the bigger sportbikes that "you can beat me on a road, but I can kick your butt anywhere the road isn't paved". It's been a ton of fun for me. It's comfortable on long rides, very cheap to fill it up, and depending on where you live, you might not ever have to max the speed out (I enjoy riding it around on back roads, or even roads that are dirt or gravel).



BTW, I'm 21, and it sounds like you're in exactly the same position I was when I got it.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
pgilles: It was a MSF course to get the endorsement. They were really good instructors too. I learned a lot, and I did better than I thought I would riding. I hadn't really even been on a bicycle in years when I took the course.



I really appreciate the replies. I've got a couple more questions for anyone interested.



I know car companies outsource to other countries, and not all the parts will necessarily be from the country the car is made in. For instance, the window sticker for my car was "parts content: Japan 100%", as well as the car actually being assembled there, while some had parts from Canada and the USA, even though the car was Japanese.



I assume that the older TW200's are all made in Japan of Japanese parts? I'm hoping that the bike is still 100% Japanese parts, and that they haven't outsourced to cut costs.



Also, I know there are a couple different brands that make tires for the TW200, but what kind of tires usually come on them?
 

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Also, I know there are a couple different brands that make tires for the TW200, but what kind of tires usually come on them?


Mine had Bridgestone tires. I can't remember the exact type however. BTW, mine's a 2008.
 
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