TW200 Forum banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
258 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hard decision but I'm happy. I've got a new job but frankly I'm a bit sick of work as well!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,841 Posts
One thing I had to learn the hard way was never turn your hobby into a business. Pretty soon it's just work!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,123 Posts
Congrats
My last day was April 13th!



Doing some part time contracting work now to keep the bills paid, but it sure is nice to not work a "9-5" that requires you to read your email at night before going to bed and in the morning before going to work, get calls on the weekend, have to stay late, blahblah blah
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,102 Posts
Congrats
My last day was April 13th!



Doing some part time contracting work now to keep the bills paid, but it sure is nice to not work a "9-5" that requires you to read your email at night before going to bed and in the morning before going to work, get calls on the weekend, have to stay late, blahblah blah




I love my job! lifeskillssandiego.com



Ronnydog
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,517 Posts
This is certainly a topic that applies to our current economy. I suspect we move on for many reasons; perhaps you are not fulfilled, feeling appreciated, or you are so frustrated with your environment as to (maybe) do something very inappropriate. For me it was the latter.



I worked for the same company for 21 years. With my paycheck I was able to purchase a very modest house and a number of modestly priced toys. I know it is something of a catch-22, but one reason that I was able to do what I did on my $16.35 an hour was, I did/do not have any 'Family' obligations. Seems, like my TW adventures, I have generally done 'life' solo.



When these situations arise, one needs to do what one needs to do. For most of us, our jobs represent a significant part of our sense of being. Silly I know, but when you spend almost 1/3 of your life doing a certain thing, with a certain group of people, it seems to become a part of who you think you are.



I made a move from frustration to 'nothing'; I stay VERY busy dealing with getting the house tip-top, but my income and social 'network' has changed significantly. Should I have stayed and had been 'forced' to deal with the chronic complaining and negativity, I fear I may have hurt someone.....



In my opinion, the above posts make reference to what could be a 'life changing event', I suggest you proceed with 'eyes wide open' and some degree of caution/planning.



Ronnydog, I like what it seems you are doing, good for you. Given that I have had an opportunity (one that you need to make for yourself) to do some counseling, I have found little as insightful as having a chance to talk with a trained communicator. Knowing that someone has REALLY HEARD what you are saying affords you the opportunity to quickly move beyond the point that has left you feeling frustrated.



In a nutshell; if you can't get your 'bike' running correctly, go to a good 'mechanic'. Take care; Gerry



 

·
Registered
Joined
·
138 Posts
Best to you, I hope the new job becomes a great job or leads to a great job.



Well I am not sure that I will or will not be happy, then who is? Two more days and I will be unemployed.



I have had good jobs and I have had bad jobs.



In two more days I will retire from my job as a Teacher. It has been a good job, it has been a bad job, but I have truly enjoyed the time that I have had as a Teacher.



If I were to be a smart man I would have been applying for another job six months ago. I have let City Woman know it is not that I do not intend to work again but I do plan on taking a year off at least before I even think of working again.



I know that taking a year off can be the end of working again, I am lucky for as I tell City Woman we are truly lucky, if I do decide to work again it will not be for the need of money.



I do hope that each and everyone will be able to retire one day too.



On a side note I just had the Inder Motorcycle Trailer I have ordered delivered last week – I plan on making a hitch for the TW to pull the toy around, will come in handy to bring some comforts when I do overnight camping trips and such.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
258 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Thanks for the comments. My colleagues were shocked but I have another gig starting 2nd July and I will get away from a stupid (sorry) American boss (in Asia who knows nothing about Asia). I'm in the oil and gas industry - it's busy at the moment so no problem moving.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,123 Posts
My coworkers "couldn't believe" that I was leaving either. Had been there 8 or 9 years, moved up from entry level to a meaningless title with "Director" in front. With the help of a couple of folks that worked closely with me, we brought the company from almost a half million dollar loss per year to significant profit.



The boss got greedy though, and the job became less and less fun for me. All the perks that I mentioned when my friends asked why I didn't get a higher paying job somewhere else started to be whittled away. Promises were not kept, but continued to flow freely. I realized that the grant and investment money that we received on numerous occasions, that our small team worked very hard to get, had been squandered again and again rather than improving the business. And it was consuming most of my waking hours, at least 5 out of 7 days per week.



The truth of the matter is that the people that didn't leave (a few of us did, either by our own choice or by positions being "eliminated" to further line the owner's pockets) -- they either weren't confident enough in their skills/qualifications to seek another job, or were just "too comfortable" after years and years in the same company.



Change is good, embrace it
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
173 Posts
IMO the earlier someone can get out of the mess their in....the better off they are. One of the things I'm involved I've deemed the "brown suit job". (doing a good job around here is like peeing yourself in a brown suit, it gives you a warm feeling but nobody notices) Good luck to everybody on their working endeavors- try to get the most enjoyment out of everything you do, none of us gets out of here alive.....OM
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
258 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
My coworkers "couldn't believe" that I was leaving either. Had been there 8 or 9 years, moved up from entry level to a meaningless title with "Director" in front. With the help of a couple of folks that worked closely with me, we brought the company from almost a half million dollar loss per year to significant profit.



The boss got greedy though, and the job became less and less fun for me. All the perks that I mentioned when my friends asked why I didn't get a higher paying job somewhere else started to be whittled away. Promises were not kept, but continued to flow freely. I realized that the grant and investment money that we received on numerous occasions, that our small team worked very hard to get, had been squandered again and again rather than improving the business. And it was consuming most of my waking hours, at least 5 out of 7 days per week.



The truth of the matter is that the people that didn't leave (a few of us did, either by our own choice or by positions being "eliminated" to further line the owner's pockets) -- they either weren't confident enough in their skills/qualifications to seek another job, or were just "too comfortable" after years and years in the same company.



Change is good, embrace it




You're certainly right in the last bit. The IQ / EQ of the company I left has dropped dramatically in the last few years due to numerous layoffs and a lot of smarter people seeing the writing and exiting. I'm off to Aberdeen, Scotland for training on the 2nd of July and I liked my new boss so far! A 20% uplift helps as well.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
10,664 Posts
Eeeeeewww, Operose, you mentioned grant money. Funny how grant money brings out the worst in bosses.



I teach agricultural mechanics (everything from leaf blowers to combines), run the greasy end of a research program testing commercially available alternative fuels in a variety of vehicles on dynos and in real-world applications (I know the true costs of ethanol and bio-diesel), and still dabble in other time killers for profit.



Seems EVERYTHING associated with work at the university has to do with grants and loans, either directly or indirectly through the students. Almost nobody is on a learn-as-you-earn plan. All the equipment and chemicals we use in both programs is paid for with research grants or provided by manufacturers, right down to the shop towels. Half my job is creating paperwork to get more grants and donations, but there is no accountability as to where the grants and donations go. We will buy 4000 gallons of fuel, use a few hundred, and the rest is gone. I can only use one tractor in the shop when the grass isn't growing, because if the grass is growing, the tractor is at the dean's home. The elites are often wanting me to teach their classes because they are traveling to exotic locations to be wined and dined and more by companies that want their products used in the classes I teach. In short, whenever the government is involved, moeny flows like blood from roadkill. The elite are BS artists--they convince someone in government or industry to pay the bills, then convince someone else to do the work, and collect a hefty percentage for being in the middle and doing little or nothing. I have one boss who does not know how to turn a computer on, but sure knows how to BS.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
239 Posts
A little over 10 years ago in 2002, when I was 58, I retired from the College of Technology at Boise State University. My financial advisor calculated that with the 2 small pensions from my previous life as an Ironworker and my State pension from Idaho I would come out $14 less take home every pay period (2 weeks).



Well, Dah! Would I like all that free time for adventures in Idaho and the Pacific Northwest? I concluded that that being the case, I would just find something to occupy my free time.



I am also a History Buff and since moving to Idaho in 1972 I have explored many of the old ghost and mining towns in the back country. I always check out the ancient cemeteries and read the epitaphs on the tombstones. The one I have never seen would say:

“Gee, I wish I would have worked more”.



Happy Trails All





Ron in Boise
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,102 Posts
This is certainly a topic that applies to our current economy. I suspect we move on for many reasons; perhaps you are not fulfilled, feeling appreciated, or you are so frustrated with your environment as to (maybe) do something very inappropriate. For me it was the latter.



I worked for the same company for 21 years. With my paycheck I was able to purchase a very modest house and a number of modestly priced toys. I know it is something of a catch-22, but one reason that I was able to do what I did on my $16.35 an hour was, I did/do not have any 'Family' obligations. Seems, like my TW adventures, I have generally done 'life' solo.



When these situations arise, one needs to do what one needs to do. For most of us, our jobs represent a significant part of our sense of being. Silly I know, but when you spend almost 1/3 of your life doing a certain thing, with a certain group of people, it seems to become a part of who you think you are.



I made a move from frustration to 'nothing'; I stay VERY busy dealing with getting the house tip-top, but my income and social 'network' has changed significantly. Should I have stayed and had been 'forced' to deal with the chronic complaining and negativity, I fear I may have hurt someone.....



In my opinion, the above posts make reference to what could be a 'life changing event', I suggest you proceed with 'eyes wide open' and some degree of caution/planning.



Ronnydog, I like what it seems you are doing, good for you. Given that I have had an opportunity (one that you need to make for yourself) to do some counseling, I have found little as insightful as having a chance to talk with a trained communicator. Knowing that someone has REALLY HEARD what you are saying affords you the opportunity to quickly move beyond the point that has left you feeling frustrated.



In a nutshell; if you can't get your 'bike' running correctly, go to a good 'mechanic'. Take care; Gerry




I think I would bring my bike to you!



Ronnydog
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,123 Posts
any tips on how to not get "sucked back into it" ?



I don't really want to work in this industry, it just came about because it was naturally easy to me. Would prefer to put my degree to use... but after resigning from my position as Director of Quality Assurance for an IT company, for some dumb reason jumped right into a contracting position for one of our old clients. Now they are pressuring me to move here, work full time on their staff, blahblahblah I keep dodging it but maybe should just find another job that is actually in an industry that interests me?



When you guys get this "life" stuff figured out, let me know and we'll publish a book
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
258 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
Operose - I don't know how, my new job is in the same industry - I have moved industries before though - for example at one point I was an IT team leader and my next job was a project manager for instrumentation in an oil and gas service compayn.



So far the new job is good!
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top