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Hey guys,

I was playing a bit with the carb in the last days, new gaskets etc
When I put it back I inserted first the boot to the airbox and then the engine side, I wanted to make sure that the airbox to carburetor part was completely sealed and well connected right? Keep also in mind that my carburetor had the pilot screw set to 3,25 turns out to run perfectly

So as said I wanted to make sure the seal was good so I inserted as best as possible and then tighten the screw of the clamp

The bike started to run, but not in a very good way, I tought, oh well, I spent a lot of time on the bike it must be cold, infact after a while it started to run good until next day, I was not able to keep the bike turned on without a huge amount of choke and sometime when coming to a stop the bike will die

Rush to the box, remove the sparkplug and what I discover? A completely black sparkplug, I mean Batman suit is probably white compared to that spark haha
So I had my assumption that I had a proper and very very good seal with the airbox boot (which as you may know is somewhat short) so I lowered the pilot screw to about 2,25-2,50 turns out, bike runs awesome again

This is probably just a suggestion thread then, when you deal with carburetor, like moving, twisting etc, make always sure that you maybe check the sparkplug after, a small leak of air could make the mixture lean or maybe you manage to close even better the seal and the mixture could be very rich suddenly

:)

EDIT: Keep in mind that the last time I tocuhed the carburetor was like 1 month ago and the bike has been running great since then, after messing with it I managed a better seal and had to readjust the mixture
 

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A very good point, and for any repair/tune/R&R, it's a good idea to just stand there for a moment or two and think about what might have gotten moved, twisted, cut, punctured, forgotten, or whatever during the operation that you may not have noticed. :eek: And another hint: The very most likely time that this may happen is when you allow someone or somehing to interrupt your work! I lock the barn door and don't answer the telephone! :mad:
 

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Intake leaks are much more common than generally realized.
When inserting a carb into a rubber boot, it is a very good idea to lubricate the contact surface(s) with a little water, diluted soap or even spit.
When the pilot jet orifice is clear, the pilot jet is a "normal" size for altitude, then having to go to 3 turns plus is generally an indication of an intake leak.
 
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