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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all, first post. Been lurking for a few months. There are some fantastic resources in this group. And not just about TW's either. Thank you to all who have contributed to those efforts.
Back on topic. I received the new K270 for the front today (4.60x18) and when looking for the date code I noticed a little circle on one side with an arrow in it. I remember seeing hundreds of times that K270 weren't directional and I've used these on several other bikes and never saw they were directional either. So I reached out to Kenda and they replied within a couple hours that YES INDEED the K270 are directional as indicated by the very tiny hard to notice symbol. I bet that's why some had experienced the strange wear pattern where the widervcenter lug chews off leaving the concentric lugs untouched. Pulls the belts or cords the wrong way causing the tire to deform at speed. I'm going to attempt attaching a picture of the symbol. If it doesn't work I dunt know what I'm doing lol.
209641
 

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The two questions I would put to Kenda at this point - is at what speed this become critical - and whether this applies to the tire being used on the front, or on the rear .....
 

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Also there is sometimes a mark on tires telling you where you should mount the tire, a pointer you can use to put where the valve stem goes or opposite side because of the balance of the tire. The heavy side or the light side and if you get it right helps so you don't have to put on many balancing weights.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I suggested instead that they make the indicator more noticeable and that they ask the distributors to add the info to the tires listing info. I see people recommending putting rear tires on backwards for on the front and all the reasons behind doing so. But it occurs to me that the rear tires were designed to be able to stop going the correct rotation to begin with. I wouldn't risk twisting the belts and cords, tires aren't cheap and excess vibrations suck unless your naked.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Also there is sometimes a mark on tires telling you where you should mount the tire, a pointer you can use to put where the valve stem goes or opposite side because of the balance of the tire. The heavy side or the light side and if you get it right helps so you don't have to put on many balancing weights.
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yep
 

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That's it!! Can save you a whole lot of frustration.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Usually theres a lot of attention directed towards the rotational mark, or it is big enough to be noticed.
When installing tires, I always look for a rotation indicator...if there isn't one, anything goes; although this one might seem easy to miss.
I usually buy directional only tires for most things so I'm used to looking for it. This is the fourth time I've bought k270s but the first time I've noticed the symbol. Usually the arrow is much more easily identified. And it usually says ROTATION in nice letters. I wonder if the shinko copy is the same way?
 

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If you put a rear on the front the rotation should be backwards. Also the balance marks are usually ink as you can't tell where the light spot is until it's out of the mould ;)
 

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Also please post of pic of the tire mounted.
 

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Yes, the direction of rotation is the same whether the tire mounted on the front or the rear of the bike. The theory as I understand it is that the forces that the tire sees are different depending on where it is mounted, i.e., the rear tire sees the greatest forces during acceleration while the front tire see its greatest forces during braking.
 

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Mounting a tire backwards might be bad if they are designed with specific tread interaction such as displacing water etc.
The reason FOR putting them on backwards when used front on rear and rear on front is: directional tires for the front are designed to absorb the higher braking forces that the front tires are subjected to - and directional tires for the rear are designed to handle the pushing forces on acceleration. If you are just putting around; you are probably not subjecting them to the point of fatigue failure.
Dang it Brian - quit answering while I am hunt and pecking!
 

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Discussion Starter #15
BOTH answers make sense...(y)
Kinda. But Idk, I don't think it's a wise idea to make a blanket statement about all tires can be run either way. If you take a few minutes to read up on how belts and cords work together in tires and get a basic understanding of the physics behind it, I wouldn't risk running a directional tire backwards. At the very least it's going to vibrate like hell once the belts twist out of alignment. At the very worst... Your family needs a grief counselor. Could just be me being weird in the head too. Years ago I wouldn't have cared and done it. Older, wiser (hopefully), and less willing to take unnecessary risks. My wife fell over dead with no warning a couple years ago and it really makes you look at everything different. Is that tire philosophy really worth putting your family thru all that pain for the rest of their lives if something were to go wrong at highway speed? Losing her destroyed me, I almost died from the stress of losing her. Had to give up my bike because I couldn't Ride it. Doctors thought I would be dead by the end of the year. Ended up needing a cane to walk for awhile. At some point I was able to start dealing with losing her and started getting better as the stress levels went down. Last year I was better enough to get a scooter to get back on two wheels again. This year I'm better enough to get back on a real bike. Which lead me to a nicely written blog from someone named Gina about finding a tw helped her with her grief and here I am with a TW too. And yes it definitely does help to get the wind in your face and smell freshly shredded dirt.
Anyway. I know this has probably changed zero opinions but just keep in mind, it might not be you that has to deal with the outcome if it fails.
 

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That was an unexpected morsel of wisdom, obscured in an odd place. I'm glad I read this thread - Thanks.
Sorry you had to go through that, and also happy you lived to tell the story.
 

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Sorry to hear about what you have gone through – but, thanks for sharing that, it’s never easy

IMO, if the tread pattern appears uni-directional, it probably is. But there is also the way the layers are put down, but then again, with a completely (intentionally) uni-directional tire, surely that would also apply

I think the bottom line is the TW itself. Not known for speed (or braking), if the tire in question is running on the front, it shouldn’t present a problem. That the TW is perfectly capable of accelerating like stink is of no matter if the tire is on the front, and braking forces are likely just as equal for the front and rear as far as the TW is concerned. Sure, if you were running at 130mph with twin discs and slammed on the anchors – maybe – but we’re not

So surely If the directional forces are equal, and the tread pattern is equal, it should not matter – at least as far as the TW is concerned – stamping on the TW rear brake is going to apply the same effect on that tire if it is on the rear, likely less if it is on the front. So it becomes not about the tire, but about the bike

It would be interesting to hear what Kenda have to say on this, though I suspect they will simply say “follow the arrow” and ignore the intended application …..
 

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Discussion Starter #18
It would be interesting to hear what Kenda have to say on this, though I suspect they will simply say “follow the arrow” and ignore the intended application …..
Yep, follow the arrow lol. Even Moto Z wasn't willing to back up their customer satisfaction because I used their "rear" tire on the front. So I'm stuck with a 120$ tire. I agree the tw isn't heavy or fast enough to be a concern. But it would constantly nag at the back of my mind and would take away from my enjoyment of the bike.
 

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Yep, follow the arrow lol. Even Moto Z wasn't willing to back up their customer satisfaction because I used their "rear" tire on the front. So I'm stuck with a 120$ tire. I agree the tw isn't heavy or fast enough to be a concern. But it would constantly nag at the back of my mind and would take away from my enjoyment of the bike.
As others have said on the TW it doesn't matter as rear tires are way overbuilt for use on the front so they are not going to suffer any catastrophic failure. It's more of a directional tread pattern thing, if one exists. Still no manufacture is ever going to say it's OK. And if it makes you feel better we routinely reverse directional slicks on 450 supermotos all the time. Don't forget to post a pic, I'm interested in the profile of this tire!
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Hoping to get the Kenda on tomorrow. I was winterizing the Majesty to put it away since no one bought it yet and inadvertantly locked the keys under the seat... And the fully dressed scooters are a Japanese jig saw puzzle to take apart. Thankfully the steering wasn't locked... But it's scattered all thru the garage and I still can't see the back of the lock cylinder to get to the release cable...
 
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