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I rode for groceries when the temperature was 11*F. When I arrived at the grocery the key would turn the ignition on and off, but it wouldn't come out of the lock. A trip to O'Rielly's netted a little aerosal bottle of lock deicer. The bottle works by pushing its spout into the lock slot, or in this case, where the key entered the lock slot. 4 or 5 little squirts had the key working properly, and no problem since.
 

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I rode for groceries when the temperature was 11*F. When I arrived at the grocery the key would turn the ignition on and off, but it wouldn't come out of the lock. A trip to O'Rielly's netted a little aerosal bottle of lock deicer. The bottle works by pushing its spout into the lock slot, or in this case, where the key entered the lock slot. 4 or 5 little squirts had the key working properly, and no problem since.




I think the ultimate solution is NOT to ride in the 11' temperatures...you are brave.
 

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Had the same situation two weeks ago with mine but it was the clutch cable (seven below) one I arrived home and stuck it back in the heated garage problem solved. Had friend put Heet in his quad to get it started and it destroyed all the gaskets, this was two years ago and his grizzly has not moved since.
 

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Seven and eleven degrees????? Man, you guys are tough!!!! Around here when the temps get to 60 the number of motorcycles are very few. Below 50 and the only guys out there are Igofar and one guy I met that moved here from Alaska.
 

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I had my own icy ignition switch problem. It was 15-20 degrees early last week for a few days. Key went in, wouldn't turn. I pushed the bike around to the porch where I could plug in the heat gun and gave it a blast. After a short time on the road, of course, it froze again so I just used the kill switch and left the key on. Got home, heated it up to get the key out, pushed it back around the house. The moisture is still in there but it never stays that cold for long around here so I doubt it'll be a problem. A shot of WaterDisplacement #40 will go in there next time I start it up.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I had my own icy ignition switch problem. It was 15-20 degrees early last week for a few days. Key went in, wouldn't turn. I pushed the bike around to the porch where I could plug in the heat gun and gave it a blast. After a short time on the road, of course, it froze again so I just used the kill switch and left the key on. Got home, heated it up to get the key out, pushed it back around the house. The moisture is still in there but it never stays that cold for long around here so I doubt it'll be a problem. A shot of WaterDisplacement #40 will go in there next time I start it up.


Go ahead and hit it with the WD40 ASAP. That way it will be good to go next ride.
 

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Go ahead and hit it with the WD40 ASAP. That way it will be good to go next ride.




qwerty hit the nail on the head on this one with the WD40, it's one of the things you can use to help thaw locks.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
qwerty hit the nail on the head on this one with the WD40. I even put a quick shot in during the summer just to keep the lock lubed. Key turns smoother.


Actually, it is unwise to use WD40 to lube locks. WD40 leaves an oily residue that attracts dust and grit which causes wear and a buildup of crud. WD40 displaces water, which often turns a thin film or small amounts of water into drops, which freeze, causing little chunks of ice that prevent small mechanical contraptions like locks from working.



The best lock lubricant is a graphite powder. I use that which is sold for lubing the wheels on Pinewood Derby racers since I have several tubes of the stuff left over from my sons' Cub Scout days. It doesn't take much. And not very often since water won't hardly wash the stuff out and graphite dries readily. Also, graphite does not attract dust and grit. If I didn't already have cubby graphite I would use a product called Dri Slide, which is graphite mixed in a solvent base. The solvent helps the graphite penetrate, then evaporates, leaving the graphite behind. Dri Slide is also good for cables and lever pivots.



EDIT: The best stuff I've found for cleaning cruddy locks is plain old starting fluid. It dissolves the oils and floats the grit away, then evaporates quickly.
 

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I've used Lock-Ez for many years as a cable and switch lube. Never any problems even in the cold Maryland winters.
 

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Seven and eleven degrees????? Man, you guys are tough!!!! Around here when the temps get to 60 the number of motorcycles are very few. Below 50 and the only guy out there is Igofar or one guy I met that moved here from Alaska.


Yeah you are a trooper! If I have to work early and its in the low 60's I think I'm gonna freeze to death. Not much for inclement weather around here the only place that sees much cold is the observatories on Mauna Kea and at 11'000ft I don't really think I'll take the TW up anytime soon.




 

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I rode for groceries when the temperature was 11*F. When I arrived at the grocery the key would turn the ignition on and off, but it wouldn't come out of the lock. A trip to O'Rielly's netted a little aerosal bottle of lock deicer. The bottle works by pushing its spout into the lock slot, or in this case, where the key entered the lock slot. 4 or 5 little squirts had the key working properly, and no problem since.




This comes up as a subject of discussion regularly where I live (anc ak) , particularly given the business i am in (school district locksmith). In general, the only thing WD40 has going for it is it is inexpensive, and more or less edible. It has low lubricity and requires frequent re-application. Graphite is a very good lock lubricant, required on our BEST removeable core cylinders. However, graphite does not displace moisture, and mixes poorly with the aerosol lubes the un-informed sometimes put into locks requireing graphite only. I like Triflo or LPS 1 for most conventional locks.



Ether starting fluids are my all time favorite cleaner and degreaser (not used around the schools) with alcohol as a more likely choice. You have to relubricate the lock after using any deicer. Going through the freeze thaw cycle causes most lock problems, you have less trouble @ (-) 40F than slightly above and below freezing. I lube my personal vehicle locks about every two weeks (triflo) during the beginning and end of winter. Of course our seasons are described as "almost winter", "winter", "not quite winter", "road building season".



I have ridden my TW to work down to (-)12F usually fires on the second kick.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Funny thing about graphite is it has an affinity to absorb water, and water contributes to its lubricating properties.
 

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I like WD-40.

Originally developed for ICBMs.

It has got to be good!!!
 
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