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Discussion Starter #1
Hey all.. First time poster..

Can anyone tell me, what gaskets or seals do I know to fix a left side engine oil leak. it appears to be coming from underneath the stator, not the shifter or the sprocket counter shaft.

However if I am going to have the cover off, I would want to replace all the seals and gaskets.

My thoughts:
Side cover gasket
Countershaft seal

What else?

Procycle show 2 seals to do a front sprocket change, what is the second seal for?

Mike
 

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Hi Mike,

Welcome to the forum!

There are two seals on the output shaft. One on the engine side where the shaft exits the crankcase, and one on the side cover where there is a bearing that supports the outboard end of the output shaft.

There is nothing really scary under the left side cover. You don't even need to drain the oil if you don't want to. Your biggest problem will likely be removing the old gasket, unless you are fortunate enough to have yours come off cleanly. There will some resistance to removing the side cover due to the magnets in the flywheel. Also, be sure to note the routing of the stator wires where they exit the engine. It is very easy to pinch these wires when replacing the side cover if you are not careful.

Any more questions, just ask,

Brian
 

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TW-Brian makes some good points.
I'll just add: When removing the cover, there are a couple of "pockets" and crevices that can hold a LOT of dirt. If this is your first rodeo, I would suggest having a shop vac handy to suck the gravel, grass and whatnot...instead of having it fall into your engine.
Keep an eye out for the TWO alignment dowels (in the cover), and don't over-tighten the retaining bolts on the front sprocket. Torque them lightly and add a drop of Loc-Tite to hold them in place; make sure you wait 12 hours for it to cure properly.
A light film of grease on the gasket (or mating surfaces) will hold the gasket in place during assembly, and will ensure the cover comes off easily - without destroying the gasket next time.

Welcome to the club.
 

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I would recommend to give the bike a bath prior. Especially the engine of corse.
 

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Once you have the cover off and are addressing the seal on the output shaft bearing why not inspect the bearing at the same time?
If at all sandy, gritty or spins rough now is the time to replace the bearing. It is a common metric size readily available from many bearing vendors, no need for ordering one from Yamaha. After all, Yamaha does not manufacture bearings.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
All: Great advice.. Much appreciated.

So a little history. I just bought this bike from those 46 or so that were available in Salem IL. My experience has mostly been good- a project bike for sure. Although who ever worked on them did a poor job. Here is what the side cover looked like. I don't see much of a gasket... no wonder it leaked.

20191124_154133.jpg

20191124_154128.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #9
BTW.. one of the best things I did before starting this job was getting the Motion Pro JIS Crosshead bit and using my Harbor Freight 3/8" impact to get those awful JIS case screws off. using that combo, made it a cinch. Whew! I have ordered the 8MM hex screws from Yamaha as replacements.
 

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So a little history. I just bought this bike from those 46 or so that were available in Salem IL. My experience has mostly been good- a project bike for sure. Although who ever worked on them did a poor job. Here is what the side cover looked like. I don't see much of a gasket... no wonder it leaked.

View attachment 200176

View attachment 200178

Well there's your problem! :D
 

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Seals are cheap as is oil! When ever I remove the left side cover I have a new cover gasket on hand and both the inner and outer output shaft seals plus the shift shaft and neutral switch seal handy. I bet the total price to do this right when replacing the front sprocket is under $20 for the seals themselves. Getting the wires from the stator up to under the seat is the real trick here and there is an actual slot they go through. There is also a little plastic splash piece, not sure what it is called or if you can buy a new one but it keeps dirt from entering the inner case. Pay strict attention when removing the side cover so the dowel pins don't drop into the gears and go back where they belong. This job is easier with the bike on its side with the oil left in but also dangerous if you lose one of the dowel guide pins into the sump. Also, lay the new cover gasket on a cardboard piece as a template and when you remove a screw poke it through where it goes back because they are all different lengths. I always do this job with the bike upright after dumping the oil out.

GaryL
 

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Hi Mike,

Welcome to the forum!
Also, be sure to note the routing of the stator wires where they exit the engine. It is very easy to pinch these wires when replacing the side cover if you are not careful.
Any more questions, just ask,
Brian

Hello,
The wires have a little is were pinched ( To control well )
 
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