TW200 Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
78 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I came across this rascal yesterday on one of my regular loops. Stopped long enough for a few pics and to escort it safely across the road.

It's been a surprise to me that I have not seen more of them this year.



 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,346 Posts
beautiful fella! thanks for giving it it's space and not flattening it, too many think and act otherwise.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,126 Posts
is that a rattlesnake? did you get it to rattle for you?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,702 Posts
Its a rattlesnake and in the right place to be an Eastern Timber Rattlesnake. By my best guess, its a female and most likely laden with young ones soon to be born. It could be we are relatively late in the year for new ones to be born, but the time varies with geography and yearly weather patterns. Thanks for giving her (him) the pass. I've only seen a couple so far this year and they were both victims of previous traffic. Tom
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
78 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
is that a rattlesnake? did you get it to rattle for you?


Yes and yes.......This is a timber rattlesnake in what is called a yellow phase. They usually rattle very easily when approached and

this one did rattle a lot. It's more of a buzzzzz than a rattle though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,013 Posts
Sure looks healthy.



Here is one gal (I have been told it is a female) I nearly ran over but didn't. As far as I know she is alive and well.



 

·
Registered
Joined
·
78 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Its a rattlesnake and in the right place to be an Eastern Timber Rattlesnake. By my best guess, its a female and most likely laden with young ones soon to be born. It could be we are relatively late in the year for new ones to be born, but the time varies with geography and yearly weather patterns. Thanks for giving her (him) the pass. I've only seen a couple so far this year and they were both victims of previous traffic. Tom


This is very near to where I was raised and the rattler's in this watershed have always been shorter and have more girth than ones we may encounter even 8 -10 miles from here. That has been the case my whole life here. Male of female, I wasn't about to turn it over and count the special scales near it's anal area to find out. LOL
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,702 Posts
Tony, Is that snake with the barbershop tail from your area of California (i.e. north of southern CA). I'm used to Pacific rattlesnakes not having nearly as distinct differentiation between the white and black rings on tail (usually its more like grey and black). Now if you were to tell me that snake is from coastal or foothill southern California, I'd say you have a nice red rattlesnake there. Curious minds want to know, if you want to share additional information on where it is from. Tom
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,013 Posts
Tony, Is that snake with the barbershop tail from your area of California (i.e. north of southern CA). I'm used to Pacific rattlesnakes not having nearly as distinct differentiation between the white and black rings on tail (usually its more like grey and black). Now if you were to tell me that snake is from coastal or foothill southern California, I'd say you have a nice red rattlesnake there. Curious minds want to know, if you want to share additional information on where it is from. Tom


I posted the picture once before 3 or 4 years ago and IGOFAR responded what type it was and its sex.

The picture was taken about 20 miles north of Santa Cruz about 75 yards from a cliff which at the bottom was the Pacific Ocean so it was right on the coast.



I will search and see if I can find when I first posted the picture. It seems to me "Oregon" was in the name of the type of snake it is.



Found it:



http://tw200forum.co...1/ShowPost.aspx



from the old forum.. Back then my name was "Elime".



Tony

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,702 Posts
Crotalus viridis oreganus - western or prairie rattlesnake. The species is quite widespread and hence quite variable in color pattern. We have a related subspecies here in New Mexico but a bit different in coloration and body shape.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top