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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I'm looking for instructions on installing my Kickstarter kit
The manual I bought isn't much help(pics are just a black blob)…
If I take a bike apart I can usually put it back together,
This is a little different..
I have never seen what this is supposed to look like.
I need to figure out what parts come out of the bike..
And not only where the new parts go but which they go in.
I called the dealer for their price. They said 2001and up models
We're not set up for a Kickstarter so they are definitely off the list!!!
Any help ideas or links would be appreciated...
I hope to start this and a few other modifications early next Saturday morning..
Mike
 

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Discussion Starter #2
I'm looking for instructions on installing my Kickstarter kit
The manual I bought isn't much help(pics are just a black blob)…
If I take a bike apart I can usually put it back together,
This is a little different..
I have never seen what this is supposed to look like.
I need to figure out what parts come out of the bike..
And not only where the new parts go but which they go in.
I called the dealer for their price. They said 2001and up models
We're not set up for a Kickstarter so they are definitely off the list!!!
Any help ideas or links would be appreciated...
I hope to start this and a few other modifications early next Saturday morning..
Mike
 

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418 Posts
Hope these help

Assembly instructions. Tw 200 kick starter "kit"
1. Put together the sub-assembly as shown in figure 1. The horseshoe clip (2) goes on the starter gear (8) so that the extension points away from the gear. The tip of tension spring (5) fits into the hole on kick axle (1). The spacer (4) had one side with a single dimple which covers the tip of tension spring (5) as it enters the kick axle (1).
2. Remove the engine protector.
3. Drain the oil.
4. Remove the rear brake pedal.
5. Remove right hand side foot rest.
6. Remove crank case cover. See pg. 4-15 in service manual. If there is corrosion on the dowel pins, the cover may be difficult to remove. Just gently tap it and rock it and avoid the temptation to pry it off which could damage the gasketed surfaces.
7. Remove the clutch. Use the special clutch holding tool to avoid damage to clutch boss. See pg. 4-16 in service manual.
8. Refer to figure 2. Remove the circlip and spacer (the ones referenced by the dashed lines and Japanese characters) from the idle shaft. These two parts can be set aside, for they are not required for the kickstarter. Place washer (11), kick idle gear (12), flat sided washer (13), and new circlip (14) onto the idle shaft.
9. Refer to figure 3. Add the tabbed-washer (7) and washer (9) to the sub-assembly put together in step 1. Align the two tabs on tabbed washer plate (7) with the two indents in the spacer (4).
10. Refer to figure 2. Place the sub-assembly from step 9 into the crank case. Squirt some oil into the hole where kick axle seats. Align the extension of the horseshoe clip (2) with the indent in the crank case (directly at the bottom). Wind the torsion spring half a turn and hook on to projection B.
11. Now is a good time to clean off the old gasket material. It is easier to clean the crank case side without the clutch basket in the way.
12. Install the clutch. See pgs. 4-71 to 4-73 in the service manual. Use the new lock washer (17) when installing the clutch boss bolt. If you have an O-ring on your clutch push-rod shaft, use the new one (18) supplied with the kit.
13. Refer to figure 4. Remove the crank case cover (^) plug and replace it with the included oil seal (10). Apply some grease to the inner part of oil seal to help it slide over the kick axle.
14. Install the crank case cover. See pg 4-74 in the service manual. Be careful not to damage the oil seal. Use the new gasket (19) included in kit. The grey cross hatch side of the gasket (19) goes up against the crank case cover.
15. Install the right foot rest. Torque bolt to 30 ft-lbs.
16. Install the brake pedal. Torque bolt to 22 ft-lbs.
17. Attach the kick lever (15) and tighten bolt to 12-16 ft-lbs. Ensure the kick lever (15) does not hit the frame or the crank case cover throughout its full range of motion while stowed.
18. Add engine oil.
19. Install the engine protector.
TW Kick-start.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Hope these help

Assembly instructions. Tw 200 kick starter "kit"
1. Put together the sub-assembly as shown in figure 1. The horseshoe clip (2) goes on the starter gear (8) so that the extension points away from the gear. The tip of tension spring (5) fits into the hole on kick axle (1). The spacer (4) had one side with a single dimple which covers the tip of tension spring (5) as it enters the kick axle (1).
2. Remove the engine protector.
3. Drain the oil.
4. Remove the rear brake pedal.
5. Remove right hand side foot rest.
6. Remove crank case cover. See pg. 4-15 in service manual. If there is corrosion on the dowel pins, the cover may be difficult to remove. Just gently tap it and rock it and avoid the temptation to pry it off which could damage the gasketed surfaces.
7. Remove the clutch. Use the special clutch holding tool to avoid damage to clutch boss. See pg. 4-16 in service manual.
8. Refer to figure 2. Remove the circlip and spacer (the ones referenced by the dashed lines and Japanese characters) from the idle shaft. These two parts can be set aside, for they are not required for the kickstarter. Place washer (11), kick idle gear (12), flat sided washer (13), and new circlip (14) onto the idle shaft.
9. Refer to figure 3. Add the tabbed-washer (7) and washer (9) to the sub-assembly put together in step 1. Align the two tabs on tabbed washer plate (7) with the two indents in the spacer (4).
10. Refer to figure 2. Place the sub-assembly from step 9 into the crank case. Squirt some oil into the hole where kick axle seats. Align the extension of the horseshoe clip (2) with the indent in the crank case (directly at the bottom). Wind the torsion spring half a turn and hook on to projection B.
11. Now is a good time to clean off the old gasket material. It is easier to clean the crank case side without the clutch basket in the way.
12. Install the clutch. See pgs. 4-71 to 4-73 in the service manual. Use the new lock washer (17) when installing the clutch boss bolt. If you have an O-ring on your clutch push-rod shaft, use the new one (18) supplied with the kit.
13. Refer to figure 4. Remove the crank case cover (^) plug and replace it with the included oil seal (10). Apply some grease to the inner part of oil seal to help it slide over the kick axle.
14. Install the crank case cover. See pg 4-74 in the service manual. Be careful not to damage the oil seal. Use the new gasket (19) included in kit. The grey cross hatch side of the gasket (19) goes up against the crank case cover.
15. Install the right foot rest. Torque bolt to 30 ft-lbs.
16. Install the brake pedal. Torque bolt to 22 ft-lbs.
17. Attach the kick lever (15) and tighten bolt to 12-16 ft-lbs. Ensure the kick lever (15) does not hit the frame or the crank case cover throughout its full range of motion while stowed.
18. Add engine oil.
19. Install the engine protector.
View attachment 207373
......buellzebub ....... YOU ARE THE MAN ! ! !
I think even an idiot like me can complete the Kickstarter installation now..
Thanks for taking the time to help me out with this project...
I don't know where I would be without the help of the fantastic people
On this forum...
Mike
 
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You're very welcome. But I can't take the credit for the instructions or picture, they were posted by another member on here some time back and I downloaded them. Good luck with the fitment, the instructions helped me do it
 

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I wrote this up back in January of 2016. However, the photos are no longer on that post and it is also blocked from my editing and re-inserting the photos, so I will repost it all here.
Hope this helps!

While someone might be intimidated by the installation of a kick-starter on their T-dub, let me just assure you that it's a snap. The only special tools that you'll need is a torque wrench that can go from as low as 5 ft/lbs to as high as 36 ft/lbs, a set of lock-ring pliers, and a 24mm socket. If you have that, and can change your oil, then you can do this mod. If you can't change your oil, then perhaps motorcycles aren't for you, and should consider another hobby such as rollerskating or curling... not that there's anything wrong with those!

So you can change your own oil right? Good, because that's where you'll start... drain your oil, and remove the filter cover and filter. While you're at it, remove the engine starter and the bolts that hold the right side foot-peg assembly (can you call it a rear-set on this bike? I dunno.) in place, and swing it out of the way.
207375
I taped the bike's ignition key to the oil that I'd need to refill the crankcase with before starting it again. Why? Because I knew that after getting the bike put back together with the fancy new old-school kick-starter, I'd probably forget to put oil in it, kick it over, and celebrate my success... right before seizing the engine. Have I done this before? no. Am I cautious? yes.
After a few minutes of the oil draining, and you're pretty confident that it's all out, it's time to remove the right side engine cover. This is easy, but keep in mind that many of the bolts are different lengths. A good idea, if you think you might get them confused, is to draw a pattern of the case by tracing the new gasket on a piece of paper or cardboard. When a bolt comes out, poke it through its proper location on your template. After removing all of the bolts, gently pull the engine cover straight off of the engine.

Your clutch is that big round silver thing looking you in the face, and it needs to come off too. Remove the 4 outer screws and springs, and the clutch cover and disks will come right out. Do not remove the center bolt from the clutch cover. Once the clutches are out, you're left with the clutch basket... which also needs to come off. There's a retaining washer that needs to be bent out of the way to remove the big bolt in the middle, which holds the basket on. Once you have the tabs bent down, remove the big nut. There's a special tool for holding the clutch basket, and you can go buy one if you want. You can also use an impact wrench, and that bolt will come right off. I didn't have either of those, so I got creative. I remounted the rear wheel brake lever, put the transmission in gear, used my foot to hold the brake, and turned the bolt off with a socket. Worked flawlessly:
207376


207378
Clutch basket removed, here's where you're at:

207379


Time to install your kick-starter axle assembly, and the idle gear. I did the kick-starter axle first. It's good practice to lubricate axles and bearing races as you assemble, so don't forget to do that. There's a horseshoe clip on the backside of the axle assembly (sorry, no pics) that has a barb sticking out of it. this faces the engine, and fits into a groove that's there just for it on the bottom of the case. Make sure to line this up properly, or things won't work right and you might even damage something. Cock the spring around clockwise and place it over the shaft as shown in the picture below. To install the idler, remove the lock-ring washer that Yamaha has placed over the idler axle, as well as the spacer behind it. Install your new washer, idler gear, another washer, and new lock-ring.

207380
207382


And that's pretty much that. Reinstall your clutch basket in the same manner as you removed it (utilizing your brake while the bike is in gear), making sure to follow your factory manual's torque specs. It's good practice to use new lock-washers, so make sure to have one handy. It's a funny looking little guy, and fit's only one way. Don't forget to bend those tabs back up. Reinstall the clutch discs and plates, as well as the cover and springs. Follow your factory manual torque specs. Make sure that the mating surfaces on both the engine and the engine cover are spotless, that is, with NO residual material from the old gasket, then place your new gasket over the roll-pins that align the two engine parts. If the roll-pins came off with the engine cover, just pull them out and stick them in the holes on the engine case. Drive out the plug that Yamaha installed on the engine cover to fool you into thinking that your bike shouldn't have a kick-starter. I used a 3/8" socket extension, and a light whack with a hammer on the backside of the plug. Place the engine cover back on the engine, making sure that you have the right bolts in the right spots. Torque to spec using a criss-cross pattern... much like torquing lug-nuts. Reinstall the oil filter and cover... torque to spec. Once the engine cover is good to go, install the oil seal over the kick-start axle. Make sure that the U-channel with the spring in it is facing towards the engine. Seat the seal.

207383
207384


You've got it on the run now... install the kick-start lever assembly onto the axle, and torque the bolt to spec. Reinstall the foot-peg assembly (or rear-set or whatever) using thread-lock on the bolts, and torquing to spec. Reinstall the starter and torque to spec. Presto!

Here's what you should be left with... a TW200 with a fully functional kick-starter, and a couple of parts that came off during install:

207385
207386


Now where are my keys? Oh right! Oil... I almost forgot!!
Finish up that oil change, and give it a Kick!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I wrote this up back in January of 2016. However, the photos are no longer on that post and it is also blocked from my editing and re-inserting the photos, so I will repost it all here.
Hope this helps!

While someone might be intimidated by the installation of a kick-starter on their T-dub, let me just assure you that it's a snap. The only special tools that you'll need is a torque wrench that can go from as low as 5 ft/lbs to as high as 36 ft/lbs, a set of lock-ring pliers, and a 24mm socket. If you have that, and can change your oil, then you can do this mod. If you can't change your oil, then perhaps motorcycles aren't for you, and should consider another hobby such as rollerskating or curling... not that there's anything wrong with those!

So you can change your own oil right? Good, because that's where you'll start... drain your oil, and remove the filter cover and filter. While you're at it, remove the engine starter and the bolts that hold the right side foot-peg assembly (can you call it a rear-set on this bike? I dunno.) in place, and swing it out of the way.
View attachment 207375 I taped the bike's ignition key to the oil that I'd need to refill the crankcase with before starting it again. Why? Because I knew that after getting the bike put back together with the fancy new old-school kick-starter, I'd probably forget to put oil in it, kick it over, and celebrate my success... right before seizing the engine. Have I done this before? no. Am I cautious? yes.
After a few minutes of the oil draining, and you're pretty confident that it's all out, it's time to remove the right side engine cover. This is easy, but keep in mind that many of the bolts are different lengths. A good idea, if you think you might get them confused, is to draw a pattern of the case by tracing the new gasket on a piece of paper or cardboard. When a bolt comes out, poke it through its proper location on your template. After removing all of the bolts, gently pull the engine cover straight off of the engine.

Your clutch is that big round silver thing looking you in the face, and it needs to come off too. Remove the 4 outer screws and springs, and the clutch cover and disks will come right out. Do not remove the center bolt from the clutch cover. Once the clutches are out, you're left with the clutch basket... which also needs to come off. There's a retaining washer that needs to be bent out of the way to remove the big bolt in the middle, which holds the basket on. Once you have the tabs bent down, remove the big nut. There's a special tool for holding the clutch basket, and you can go buy one if you want. You can also use an impact wrench, and that bolt will come right off. I didn't have either of those, so I got creative. I remounted the rear wheel brake lever, put the transmission in gear, used my foot to hold the brake, and turned the bolt off with a socket. Worked flawlessly:
View attachment 207376

View attachment 207378 Clutch basket removed, here's where you're at:

View attachment 207379

Time to install your kick-starter axle assembly, and the idle gear. I did the kick-starter axle first. It's good practice to lubricate axles and bearing races as you assemble, so don't forget to do that. There's a horseshoe clip on the backside of the axle assembly (sorry, no pics) that has a barb sticking out of it. this faces the engine, and fits into a groove that's there just for it on the bottom of the case. Make sure to line this up properly, or things won't work right and you might even damage something. Cock the spring around clockwise and place it over the shaft as shown in the picture below. To install the idler, remove the lock-ring washer that Yamaha has placed over the idler axle, as well as the spacer behind it. Install your new washer, idler gear, another washer, and new lock-ring.

View attachment 207380 View attachment 207382

And that's pretty much that. Reinstall your clutch basket in the same manner as you removed it (utilizing your brake while the bike is in gear), making sure to follow your factory manual's torque specs. It's good practice to use new lock-washers, so make sure to have one handy. It's a funny looking little guy, and fit's only one way. Don't forget to bend those tabs back up. Reinstall the clutch discs and plates, as well as the cover and springs. Follow your factory manual torque specs. Make sure that the mating surfaces on both the engine and the engine cover are spotless, that is, with NO residual material from the old gasket, then place your new gasket over the roll-pins that align the two engine parts. If the roll-pins came off with the engine cover, just pull them out and stick them in the holes on the engine case. Drive out the plug that Yamaha installed on the engine cover to fool you into thinking that your bike shouldn't have a kick-starter. I used a 3/8" socket extension, and a light whack with a hammer on the backside of the plug. Place the engine cover back on the engine, making sure that you have the right bolts in the right spots. Torque to spec using a criss-cross pattern... much like torquing lug-nuts. Reinstall the oil filter and cover... torque to spec. Once the engine cover is good to go, install the oil seal over the kick-start axle. Make sure that the U-channel with the spring in it is facing towards the engine. Seat the seal.

View attachment 207383 View attachment 207384

You've got it on the run now... install the kick-start lever assembly onto the axle, and torque the bolt to spec. Reinstall the foot-peg assembly (or rear-set or whatever) using thread-lock on the bolts, and torquing to spec. Reinstall the starter and torque to spec. Presto!

Here's what you should be left with... a TW200 with a fully functional kick-starter, and a couple of parts that came off during install:

View attachment 207385 View attachment 207386

Now where are my keys? Oh right! Oil... I almost forgot!!
Finish up that oil change, and give it a Kick!
Thanks Ski Pro 3 for your entertaining and informative response...
Yes luckily I can change my own oil because I'm damn sure not
going to learn to roller skate.
Have a great day..
Mike
 

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Thanks Ski Pro 3 for your entertaining and informative response...
Yes luckily I can change my own oil because I'm damn sure not
going to learn to roller skate.
Have a great day..
Mike
Don't forget curling. Inquiring minds what to know how your install turns out;

Will Workingman;
A. kick start his bike
B. take up curling
C. be forced to learn how to roller skate

Voting will stay open until he reports back with the results

Stay TUNED!
 

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Hi Mike,

The above write-ups and pictures are excellent! I would only like to add a few tips and timesavers:

-If you lean your bike over on its left side to about a 45 degree angle, you will not even need to drain your oil.
-There is no need to remove the oil filter and cover. Only the upper right most bolt on the oil filter cover needs to be removed.
-The starter does not need to be removed. One of the side cover mounting bolts has a clip that secures the starter cable. Just remove the bolt and clip and keep the cable out of the way when you replace the side cover.
-You do not need to remove either the right side foot peg or the brake pedal (although it does allow slightly easier access to a couple of the side cover bolts if these are removed). If you do decide to remove the right foot peg, be forewarned that those button head allen bolts are notoriously difficult to remove.

I hope this helps,

Brian
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Hi Mike,

The above write-ups and pictures are excellent! I would only like to add a few tips and timesavers:

-If you lean your bike over on its left side to about a 45 degree angle, you will not even need to drain your oil.
-There is no need to remove the oil filter and cover. Only the upper right most bolt on the oil filter cover needs to be removed.
-The starter does not need to be removed. One of the side cover mounting bolts has a clip that secures the starter cable. Just remove the bolt and clip and keep the cable out of the way when you replace the side cover.
-You do not need to remove either the right side foot peg or the brake pedal (although it does allow slightly easier access to a couple of the side cover bolts if these are removed). If you do decide to remove the right foot peg, be forewarned that those button head allen bolts are notoriously difficult to remove.

I hope this helps,

Brian
Great advise as always Brian..
I can usually figure out where parts go
But some times I can't figure out which
Side faces in or out, if that makes any sense..
Plus it never hurts to learn the little tricks
Others have picked up along the way.
Mike
 
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I vote A+


Marty
 

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Hey Mike,

PM me with an email address and I will send you some instructions that I made up a few years ago.

Brian
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Don't forget curling. Inquiring minds what to know how your install turns out;

Will Workingman;
A. kick start his bike
B. take up curling
C. be forced to learn how to roller skate

Voting will stay open until he reports back with the results

Stay TUNED!
Don't forget curling. Inquiring minds what to know how your install turns out;

Will Workingman;
A. kick start his bike
B. take up curling
C. be forced to learn how to roller skate

Voting will stay open until he reports back with the results

Stay TUNED!
Don't forget curling. Inquiring minds what to know how your install turns out;

Will Workingman;
A. kick start his bike
B. take up curling
C. be forced to learn how to roller skate

Voting will stay open until he reports back with the results

Stay TUNED!
UPDATE
I do not need to learn to roller skate.
Nor do I need to figure out what the heck curling is..
I can climb the highest mountain , explore the wildest wilderness
I can go where no man has gone before...
I FEAR NO BATTERY..........
I HAVE A KICKSTARTER ! ! ! !
Mike from N.C
IMG_20200905_171939.jpg
 

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Great! One of those mods that should be part of the original bike in my opinion, but it sure is a good lesson on how to crack open a side cover and work on the clutch.
 

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Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)
Great! One of those mods that should be part of the original bike in my opinion, but it sure is a good lesson on how to crack open a side cover and work on the clutch.
It's a shame when designers and engineers worry more about keeping the bean counters happy
Then the customer... I'm glad we got the disc brake but would have gladly paid a couple hundred
More and kept the kicker too. I would have been happy and im sure Yamaha would have made a
Bigger profit. Instead I had to get some bootleg clone parts.and spend much more in the long run
YAMAHA usually never lets me down. This time they did.
They failed miserably on the way the seat connects to the bike too
Mike from N.C.
 
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