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Discussion Starter #1
Sad day. Lost one of my good friends out on Ortega Highway yesterday in a solo motorcycle crash. Low side on a turn... slid off the road into a tree stump.



He was a good rider, but it didn't help. I posted a video of him out on a track day just a few weeks ago.



Those two guys up in Randsburg a couple weeks ago and now this loss has got me seriously thinking about not being an idiot out there. Be safe everyone!









Adios, Faraz. Gonna miss you brother!
 

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Thanks folks. A lot to be said for old enough to know better... He was only 34


So sorry for the loss of your friend. I was just over in Santa Ana visiting my sister and was going to ride the Ortega back. However, she had a plumbing issue the morning I was to leave so I stayed to fix it and just took the super slabs back. The Ortega is a fun road, but a little oil, sand, or missplaced car can make it pretty dangerous. As far as being old enough to know better, I'm sixty two, but think I'm 19 when I swing a leg over the bike.
 

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Sorry to hear about your loss. He was lucky to end his run doing something he loved.



Once I got a dirt bike, street riding seemed so much more dangerouse. Now I dont even have a street bike. Trees dont text, or do

make up, or even get road rage.





Rubber side down everyone. Gotta keep our kind together.
 

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Too bad another "good" rider killed himself because he wasn't "good" enough for the speed he was riding. That'll make insurance more expensive for the rest of us. I hope your grieving is healing.
 

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I guess in a way I'm actually lucky I've had a couple bad injury-crashes. They really make you stop and think, as you say. Safety has to be number one. This is why I try to take it down to 70 percent when street riding. 85 percent if I'm "racing" on the street. Very unfortunate my friend. Keep riding and stay alive, for your friend!
 

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Too bad another "good" rider killed himself because he wasn't "good" enough for the speed he was riding. That'll make insurance more expensive for the rest of us. I hope your grieving is healing.


Accidents can happen to anyone, regardless of their experience or skill level. I don't believe talking about insurance rates going up is appropriate in this case... But we do have the right to freedom of expression, so say what you will.
 

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I don't believe in "accidents." To be an accident, an event must occur without cause, which violates the laws of physical science. Everything that happens happens because of a decision someone made. Therefore, there are "wrecks", but no such thing as "accidents."



I wish I had $1 for every time someone posted about how "good", "skilled", or "awesome" a rider was before he or she made a decision that led to his or her demise, because I could have 2 or 3 new-to-me TWs and the cash to farkle them to my heart's content. It's way past time we stopped rationalizing to make ourselves feel better when a brother or sister is lost, and focus on supporting each other in making decisions that reduce the loss rate so that we don't have to rationalize.
 

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I don't believe in "accidents." To be an accident, an event must occur without cause, which violates the laws of physical science. Everything that happens happens because of a decision someone made. Therefore, there are "wrecks", but no such thing as "accidents."



I wish I had $1 for every time someone posted about how "good", "skilled", or "awesome" a rider was before he or she made a decision that led to his or her demise, because I could have 2 or 3 new-to-me TWs and the cash to farkle them to my heart's content. It's way past time we stopped rationalizing to make ourselves feel better when a brother or sister is lost, and focus on supporting each other in making decisions that reduce the loss rate so that we don't have to rationalize.


Who said an accident is "without cause". Of course there is a cause.



ac·ci·dent/ˈaksidənt/

Noun:

"An unfortunate incident that happens unexpectedly and unintentionally, typically resulting in damage or injury."



Just because the victim of an accident did not expect the event to occur in the way it did doesn't mean there was no cause of the incident. Of course decisions can cause unfortunate incidents. But everyone makes decisions. If no one made decisions, then everyone would lay in bed and die anyway. Would that be a better way to go out? Refusing to make decisions and thereby eliminating the risk of unexpected unfortunate incidents occurring... I'll stick to making decisions and taking the associated risks. Just getting on your bike and riding for a given distance and time is, in and of itself, a risk that could lead to your demise, no matter how skilled and experienced you are. It is a decision that every rider makes, and a risk that every rider takes, every time he or she gets on a motorcycle with the intent to ride it.
 

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That sucks. Sorry to hear about your friend. I rode on the street for almost 25 years before I had a major accident, then all of a sudden I realized just how close to the edge riding a bike is. I bought the airbag vest which should help quite a bit, but it still depends what you bounce off, how a person hits.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
When I said that this guy was a good rider, I was talking about his ability on a race track. That's what he did. 180mph straights and 110mph turn type stuff. He knew how to handle his bike in that environment.



Unfortunately for him, his ability on the track did not translate into his ability to deal with a real world situation on a winding country road.



For the most part, I agree with Qwerty in this particular situation. I've read the police report and talked to the friends who were there, and high speed on a blind corner were the major cause of the crash.



I don't think I would have put myself in this situation either, but if the situation had been slightly different, any of us could be taken out at any time. I ask myself every day that I get on my bike if this is going to be the day.



There is a lot of wisdom in the proverbial "those who have fallen and those who haven't fallen yet" and even more in the sub category of those that have fallen... "those that live to ride again and those that don't."



A good friend of mine is a former Superbike champ from the 90's, and a lot of people still consider him the "king" of Ortega Highway, even though he's been helicoptered off that mountain 2 times near death. He was talking to me after the funeral and he put it to me like this: Here's the deal. It doesn't matter how good of a rider you think you are or how good you actually are. One day you are going to come around a corner doing 45 and there's going to be a huge rock, or a dead deer, a squished lizard, or a car 3 feet in your lane. You are going to have 5/1000's of a second to make a decision that determines if you get jacked up or you have a great story that evening.



I think it was Lizrdbrth that was telling me about his encounter with a QUAIL that put him in a ditch one time.



Sorry if I brought anyone down with this story, but like I said, it was a reminder to me that we have chosen a dangerous method of putting a smile on our faces.



Rory
 

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An homage to a man's friend should be left at that.



Sorry for yor loss, Rory.
 

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When I said that this guy was a good rider, I was talking about his ability on a race track. That's what he did. 180mph straights and 110mph turn type stuff. He knew how to handle his bike in that environment.



Unfortunately for him, his ability on the track did not translate into his ability to deal with a real world situation on a winding country road.



For the most part, I agree with Qwerty in this particular situation. I've read the police report and talked to the friends who were there, and high speed on a blind corner were the major cause of the crash.



I don't think I would have put myself in this situation either, but if the situation had been slightly different, any of us could be taken out at any time. I ask myself every day that I get on my bike if this is going to be the day.



There is a lot of wisdom in the proverbial "those who have fallen and those who haven't fallen yet" and even more in the sub category of those that have fallen... "those that live to ride again and those that don't."



A good friend of mine is a former Superbike champ from the 90's, and a lot of people still consider him the "king" of Ortega Highway, even though he's been helicoptered off that mountain 2 times near death. He was talking to me after the funeral and he put it to me like this: Here's the deal. It doesn't matter how good of a rider you think you are or how good you actually are. One day you are going to come around a corner doing 45 and there's going to be a huge rock, or a dead deer, a squished lizard, or a car 3 feet in your lane. You are going to have 5/1000's of a second to make a decision that determines if you get jacked up or you have a great story that evening.



I think it was Lizrdbrth that was telling me about his encounter with a QUAIL that put him in a ditch one time.



Sorry if I brought anyone down with this story, but like I said, it was a reminder to me that we have chosen a dangerous method of putting a smile on our faces.



Rory




Rory: Very well said. I agree 100 percent with what your Superbike friend said. That is pretty much what I was saying in my argument with Qwerty. Anyway, thank you for posting this and giving us all another grave reminder to put safety first. By the way, what is the name of your Superbike champ friend?
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Rory: Very well said. I agree 100 percent with what your Superbike friend said. That is pretty much what I was saying in my argument with Qwerty. Anyway, thank you for posting this and giving us all another grave reminder to put safety first. By the way, what is the name of your Superbike champ friend?


John Hilton. I think it was 650 class.



He lives here in Aliso now and teaches at some of the So Cal tracks and, believe it or not, he's still racing the 20 year olds at 60ish. Crashed about a month ago at Daytona, but apparently this guy has like 30 lives .
 

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Hotshoeing around corners on public roads is wrong on so many levels. Thrilling, but wrong. There is a time and a place for everything under the sun, and public roads are not the place. What matters is this loss, no any other of this type, should not be in vain--we need to think about how we ride on the street, ride to live, and encourage others to do the same. Save the thrills for the track, or Uncle Sam will "regulate" us out of existence.
 

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Alright Qwerty, fair enough...point taken, and agreed (well, partially agreed). I'm a fan of spirited street riding, but I definitely don't think anyone should be racing on the street. Go a bit fast and have fun, but leave plenty of error margin. That's pretty much how I do it.
 

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Actually Querty your old which drives up the prices of my health insurance, is there something that can be done about that?
 
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