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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Gang,
While out and about, riding in a wash recently, I noticed the Dub was sounding a bit different than it normally does. It was primarily on acceleration that I noticed it. So, after about a few minutes of this, I decided to park and see if I could determine a cause. Well, it didn't take long. My right rear turn signal was BROKE. It was hanging down, held only by the wires. Thus, the different exhaust note was due to the light occasionally hanging in front of the exhaust tip. CRAP! Now what? Well, all I had on me was my back pack. The bike has its normal tool kit. I knew there was nothing in that, that was gonna help my situation. So, I started thinking. How am I gonna handle this? Hmmmm. Well, I kind-a knew what I needed to do but, with what?


What I needed was to basically SPLINT that broken rubber turn signal mount. Yeah, I could have more or less, just removed it. That would have remedied it. But, I figured there's gotta be something I can do. So, wondered, do I have any TAPE in the first aid kit I carry? So, out came the small, first aid kit. Yahoooo! Tape! So, I had plenty of old dried out twigs handing around me so, I broke off some shorties and, made a splint for that light. It worked like a charm for the remainder of the riding. I got back to my campsite and, removed that temp splint and, installed some cut-off section of wire tires to act as stiffeners. Then, I had the CEO (wife for those of you that are not savvy to that term in the house hold) hold those little cut-off sections in place, while I wrapped it with electricians tape.

All better.
P.S. OBVIOUSLY, this means I have re-think my emergency repair ideas for outback riding.
Scott

On edit: Well, I was darn sure I posted a picture of my "Splint" I created but, it ain't there. Oh well, here 'tis.
Scott
 

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Well done Sir!
I see no reason to re-think your emergency repair ideas...simply continue to embrace knowledge that with creativity anything available just might be used in an unintended application to solve an emergency situation. I, and likely others have done their share of McGuyver grade fixes out in the bush.
 

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Great photo.
Count on a fireman to know his first aid and how to splint a fracture,
I probably would have just done an amputation.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Great photo.
Count on a fireman to know his first aid and how to splint a fracture,
I probably would have just done an amputation.
Amputation, what a crack up! You know, I stated in my original post that, I could have removed that entire assembly and all would have been fine, 'till I got back to camp or home to either do a correct repair or, just order another new one. But, me being me, I ALWAYS take the hard route. I didn't even think of actually removing it. But, it all worked out. I may or may not order up a new one. That one's only about 8-9 months old. When we bought the bike, that one was missing due what may have been a boo-boo on the right side of the bike. So, I ordered a new aftermarket one. But, here's the deal. Just before we left on this camp trip, I was working on my rack project for it and I had temporarily leaned the bike up against some cabinets on the right side.

Well, while doing other things, I'd heard a clunk and looked over at the bike. It was leaning more against the cabinet's due to that rear turn signal, which had been supporting the lean in the first place, had gave way and, the rest of the bike was now up against the cabinets. So, that collapse of that turn signal might have cracked/fractured that rubber mounting and I didn't notice it. But, bouncing around off road, finally did it in. Guess I should have paid more attention to it when that turn signal was bent to 90 degrees down. Oh well, live and learn.
Scott
 

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Not meaning to steal a thread, but remembering trail surgery in a different life. The OP did a good job of running out the original post with photos and answers.

In the mid 70's I exited the Navy and traded my only transportation, a 72 Suzuki GT750, for an old school VW fine buggy rail. I welded up rear fenders, bolted on motorcycle front fenders, and did enough lights and a horn to make it barely street legal. I was as wild as a spring bull and it was the perfect rig for me for a year or so.

Well, I was 8 miles up the local basault peak overlooking town, when that noisy LF wheelbearing suddenly lost its balls. I had a full 21 year old male tool kit, consisting of a screwdriver, channel lock plier, crescent wrench, and Boy Scout knife.

I was able to get the hub/wheel off easy enough, but the empty spindle became a plow and it was a no-go.

I lifted the front end up enough to pull the RF wheel and hub and slip it over onto the LF side. With no passenger, except for the extra wheel and hub, I could run as a tricycle just fine. I made the 5 or 8 miles back to pavement OK, but ran into the City Police of the newly incorporated town of White City.

The officer had never seen anything like me with Oregon plates on it and gave me the white glove inspection. Finding me legal, he decided that I had earned a ticket of some kind for not having all 4 wheels on the ground.

He decided I didn't have safe brakes. I pointed out that I was legal with no front brakes and that the only front wheel on the ground was brakeless.

He said that the RF hub was close enough to the ground to hit the asphalt at every bump. I said "Look, Officer, I am not a vandal. I am a guy driving a barely legal dunebuggy that is a blast to drive on the street. Everyone will survive the day and all I want is to get home and become a 4 wheeled car agsin."

He said "Give me a ride some time?". We became good friends.

At a later date, right near where this happened, I lost a clutch throwout bearing arm and had to pull the engine and remove the offending schrapnel (alone) to drive home clutchless. Twas a year of knowledge gained.

Trail surgery, of all kinds, should be a part of every expedition. You never know when the practice will save some bacon.


Sent from my Pixel 3a XL using Tapatalk
 

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Amputation, what a crack up! You know, I stated in my original post that, I could have removed that entire assembly and all would have been fine, 'till I got back to camp or home to either do a correct repair or, just order another new one. But, me being me, I ALWAYS take the hard route. I didn't even think of actually removing it. But, it all worked out. I may or may not order up a new one. That one's only about 8-9 months old. When we bought the bike, that one was missing due what may have been a boo-boo on the right side of the bike. So, I ordered a new aftermarket one. But, here's the deal. Just before we left on this camp trip, I was working on my rack project for it and I had temporarily leaned the bike up against some cabinets on the right side.

Well, while doing other things, I'd heard a clunk and looked over at the bike. It was leaning more against the cabinet's due to that rear turn signal, which had been supporting the lean in the first place, had gave way and, the rest of the bike was now up against the cabinets. So, that collapse of that turn signal might have cracked/fractured that rubber mounting and I didn't notice it. But, bouncing around off road, finally did it in. Guess I should have paid more attention to it when that turn signal was bent to 90 degrees down. Oh well, live and learn.
Scott
maybe you could incorporate a bracket for the signals to mount to, in a downward postion so if the bike is dropped, the signals have a better chance to bend instead of breaking
 

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My shoelaces and 2 sagebrush branches one made some pliers that were an integral part in the self-rescue of a downed helicopter.
If we remember to keep calm, think it through while inventorying what is available we can often come up with creative & effective solutions in somewhat dire circumstances..
 
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