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Where can I get one of those Magnet Oil Drain Plugs? Anyone know where to buy one?
 

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I have not purchased one [yet] but Ebay item number 150652207857 appears to be what you're looking for.



Or, you can make one yourself.............instructions on this forum somewhere.
 

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If the magnets are not of 'some special' material. The high oil temps kill them. We had a forum member that made some very nice units. After my next oil change the magnet had lost most of its hold. Gerry
 

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They also don't respond to emails about their prototype. High cost? Really? Might as well tell the truth. It is due to low demand and what they can actually make money off of.
 

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Sorry. I got one of their freebies and assumed they were in production by now.



My bad.
 

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Is there any evidence whatsoever that these actually prolong engine life, reduce wear, or have any real positive benefit?



And before someone goes into a long rant about how this is theoretically beneficial, I clearly understand that it should work (and why), I just want proof that it does work. I am really skeptical that other than being difficult to clean and nearly as dramatic as a Biore Skin Strip commercial, it really gives long term benefit.
 

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KJMagnetics has high temp magnets. Normal operating temps of the "sh" type is 302F. I bought some 1/2 inch I plan on drilling and seeing if I can get a good friction fit. Maybe heat the aluminum plug with a torch and put the magnet in and let the plug shrink and cool...JB weld would probably be fine I'd just prefer epoxy free if I can.



Edit: IIRC magnets are common in automatic transmission pans and some high end vehicles magnetic plugs are stock. That is enough for me.
 

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I just did a web search for my own edification, and thought I'd share what I found. In general, there are innumerable statements made by consumers saying things like "it couldn't hurt" and "it seems like a good idea." Then there are the claims by the manufacturers/sellers: these range from misleading to ludicrous. In my humble opinion, in an engine with an oil filter, this gadget is not likely to pay for itself over the life of the vehicle, nor is it likely to improve engine life or performance. If there was any proof they worked, someone, somewhere would show it. I cannot think of a single vehicle or engine renowned for its durability and reliability that owed its long life to an oil magnet.



This is a gimmick, on par with those ridiculous magnets people wear on their wrists.



That being said, I will be the first in line if anyone can provide proof that I should buy one.
 

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If you have a tooth break off of a gear or some other small thing like the starter clutch breaking into pieces, the magnet will catch the pieces. This allows you to fix the broken part without having to fix the part that the broken part broke. If that is not enough evidence for you then you will never be convinced. These are great for the prevention problems that may be caused by another issue. Skeptics will always be skeptics but it never hurts to do a cheap mod that "may" save you a lot of money in the future.
 

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If you have a tooth break off of a gear or some other small thing like the starter clutch breaking into pieces, the magnet will catch the pieces. This allows you to fix the broken part without having to fix the part that the broken part broke. If that is not enough evidence for you then you will never be convinced. These are great for the prevention problems that may be caused by another issue. Skeptics will always be skeptics but it never hurts to do a cheap mod that "may" save you a lot of money in the future.


That's a possibility. But what are the odds a stray bit of ferrous metal will stick to the magnet before getting thrown into the gears? I would say that's not likely to happen. One other possibility is that the magnet losses its strength (and/or the glue breaks down), it gets vibrated out of the little cup it sits in, and winds up being the foreign body that gets sucked into the gears and breaks something. I will admit this is a remote possibility.



There are lots of things one can do to make a bike a little bit better, and I can generally stretch my brain enough to appreciate most modifications (even when I know this or that modification isn't my cup of tea), but the more I look into it the more I am convinced oil plug magnets are a waste.



Here's one more point: I've worked on bikes and cars for longer than I'd like to admit, but I am not a mechanic. Right now, sitting here, I could only imagine telling one of the more brilliant mechanics I know that I installed a magnetic oil plug in a motorcycle. He would roll his eyes and ask if I put holy water in the radiator of my car while I was at it.
 

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"Stray bits of metal" are perpeually removed from the innards of your engine. It's called "wear".



All hard parts are ferrous. Microscopic bits of your rings, cylinder walls and gears all collect on the magnetic oil plug and are taken out of your engine's bloodsteam.



We're not talking snake oil here.



It's unfortunate that Goldplug isn't going to produce them. Their design was easy to clean and was held in the drain plug by the filter screen in such a way that dislodging is a physical impossibility.
 

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I made my own magnetic plug and it is covered with fine metal filings every time I change the oil. If you use two magnets (bought at Loews IIRC) put them together and grind the notches at the same time. I used Marine Tex but I bet JB Weld would work just fine.











 

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I have a magnet that is held in with a clip into the drain plug. Surprised no one else has commented on tuis one. I bought it from a member on this site several years ago. It really picked up alot of metal flakes during the first oil change. It still is covered with fine metal powder after each oil change now.
 

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Maybe $2 + Shipping for a high temp magnet will pay for itself maybe not. I think it is far from snake oil it is basic physics and pulls the hardest wear particles out of your oil. The filter in our bike is pretty coarse IMHO pretty big hairs can get through it. I do agree if you don't use a "SH" type magnet though the 300 degree oil will quickly weaken the magnet.
 

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I just did a web search for my own edification, and thought I'd share what I found. In general, there are innumerable statements made by consumers saying things like "it couldn't hurt" and "it seems like a good idea." Then there are the claims by the manufacturers/sellers: these range from misleading to ludicrous. In my humble opinion, in an engine with an oil filter, this gadget is not likely to pay for itself over the life of the vehicle, nor is it likely to improve engine life or performance. If there was any proof they worked, someone, somewhere would show it. I cannot think of a single vehicle or engine renowned for its durability and reliability that owed its long life to an oil magnet.



This is a gimmick, on par with those ridiculous magnets people wear on their wrists.



That being said, I will be the first in line if anyone can provide proof that I should buy one.


Then don't buy one... there... that was simple.



As a mechanic I can apprecriate that this mod "might" have positive results... thats good enough for me.



z
 

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I'd add also, that it's likely it helps to keep the oil a tad cleaner for a bit longer. Having isolated more material to just one location would prevent this stuff from floating and circulating about. Also, when the bike is parked it's actively pulling material downward, working with gravity - which may provide a cleaner startup with less resistance from rogue material.



I've had mine since oil change #2 and have wiped metal from it everychange since then.
 

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Oh yeah, having a magnet catch stray bits of metal is a gimmick. I'm sure all the crap on the tip of my oil plug would be better off floating around in the engine instead of captured on the tip.




 
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