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More information in this thread for background, but the short answer is there is no damping adjuster, and no springload adjustment. It is a nitrogen gas-charged shock, and altering the nitrogen pressure will alter the shock's performance, but this is not something that can be easily done without specialized equipment. When you order the shock, they ask questions regarding your weight (including normal riding payload) and riding style. In my case I am a very large human, and easily overload the OEM suspension. That is what led me down this path.
 

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A question for those more knowledgable than me. If I am going to install my new Marvin Shaw Shock, does the rear wheel need to come off? Or can I simply take the load off the suspension, pull the lower mounting pin, and then let the swing arm down far enough to remove the shock?
 

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Discussion Starter · #104 · (Edited)
A question for those more knowledgable than me. If I am going to install my new Marvin Shaw Shock, does the rear wheel need to come off? Or can I simply take the load off the suspension, pull the lower mounting pin, and then let the swing arm down far enough to remove the shock?
Not at all, you just need the bike on a stand where you can drop the swingarm and rear wheel down as far as possible to give you clearance to pull the oem.

Once the oem is out, the MS shock is smaller and goes in a bit easier.

Edit: Yea what you said, just get the bike load off of the swingarm and you should be able to pull the lower or upper bolt to extract the shock. Added the how-to below just in case you want to review.

Installing the new shock with spacers/washers will be a little finicky your first time, just go slow, use plenty of grease for the bolts and if moving the swingarm up and down with the wheel on is too much of a hassle to get the bolt holes line up, just take the wheel off.

Let us know how she rides after you put her all back together!
 

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Discussion Starter · #105 ·
A question for those more knowledgable than me. If I am going to install my new Marvin Shaw Shock, does the rear wheel need to come off? Or can I simply take the load off the suspension, pull the lower mounting pin, and then let the swing arm down far enough to remove the shock?
 

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I posted this in another thread, but think it is good to also post here on the MMS thread.

The rear suspension was feeling a bit loose and shakey the last couple of rides. There was a lot of play at the trailing arm shock brackets. It still had just the oem shock pin. Am using a custom Marvin Shaw Shock. My cousin and I made a couple of custom sleeves so I could use the same as the upper shock mount. Aligned them up and welded onto the swingarm brackets. absolutely no play now. Feels like a completely different bike now. Would most likely work with a Cogent shock also. ( one thing we did find out is that the upper bolt that came with the bike is one tenth of a mm smaller diameter than a replacement oem one. Wonder what the tolerance is on their bolts?

I would highly recommend one put a bolt in with correct spacers that make snug fit when installing new using the existing swing arm bracket holes if they accept a bolt that is tight. Must match the diameter of the lower shock hole or make an aluminum tube bushing for the shock hole or the swing arm holes.


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Discussion Starter · #109 · (Edited)
I posted this in another thread, but think it is good to also post here on the MMS thread.

The rear suspension was feeling a bit loose and shakey the last couple of rides. There was a lot of play at the trailing arm shock brackets. It still had just the oem shock pin. Am using a custom Marvin Shaw Shock. My cousin and I made a couple of custom sleeves so I could use the same as the upper shock mount. Aligned them up and welded onto the swingarm brackets. absolutely no play now. Feels like a completely different bike now. Would most likely work with a Cogent shock also. ( one thing we did find out is that the upper bolt that came with the bike is one tenth of a mm smaller diameter than a replacement oem one. Wonder what the tolerance is on their bolts?

I would highly recommend one put a bolt in with correct spacers that make snug fit when installing new using the existing swing arm bracket holes if they accept a bolt that is tight. Must match the diameter of the lower shock hole or make an aluminum tube bushing for the shock hole or the swing arm holes.


View attachment 226346
I just realized I may have misinterpreted the post. Was the lower shock eye moving around on the bolt? Or was the lower shock bolt moving around in the mounting bracket holes?
 

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The left and right swingarm bracket holes were getting worn and became oval. The shock hole is fine and I had the aluminum spacers in. I made the mistake of just using the pin instead of putting a bolt and nut on. This one is torqued to 40 ft lbs just like the upper bolt. These custom made welded steel spacers eliminate the need for any other spacers. Less parts=less movement. We bored the spacers to just a hair over the diameter of the bolt. No more play.
I can see why it is extremely important to make sure the rear shock system is tight and has no play at the mounting points.
 

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Discussion Starter · #112 ·
The left and right swingarm bracket holes were getting worn and became oval. The shock hole is fine and I had the aluminum spacers in. I made the mistake of just using the pin instead of putting a bolt and nut on. This one is torqued to 40 ft lbs just like the upper bolt. These custom made welded steel spacers eliminate the need for any other spacers. Less parts=less movement. We bored the spacers to just a hair over the diameter of the bolt. No more play.
I can see why it is extremely important to make sure the rear shock system is tight and has no play at the mounting points.
Definitely an appropriate response to the bracket holes ovaling out.

I would say it is important to highlight the failure in your post that recommends using a bolt for the lower shock mount. It could easily be misinterpreted that you think a bolt should automatically be used in place of the clevis bolt and pin.

A little horizontal play is definitely ok. Up and down... not so much.
 

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It's been awesome, the rear shock was initially better, but because of the change in dampening and rebound (more agile like a MX race suspension) the bike started to suffer with handling until I finished the upgrade to the front forks with stiffer springs and the race tech emulators...

Bottom line, the Marvin Shaw Shock was an awesome upgrade that definitely was an improvement over stock and banshee, but because of my weight until the front shocks were upgraded the performance feel of the bike was delayed.

Installation is easy, you just need washer packs or have some aluminum spacers made that fit the lower and upper shock bolts.

But now, with the suspension completely upgraded... the bike has the dampening and rebound that inspires confidence, let's the bike handle tons better, braking improved, going over bumps and divots are now done with a big fat smile on my face, even steering feels a bit more responsive.

Worth every penny.
Are you still liking the MSS shock?

Didn't see that they were for sale on the MSS website... sent them a message.
 

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Discussion Starter · #114 ·
Are you still liking the MSS shock?

Didn't see that they were for sale on the MSS website... sent them a message.
I do, it's made riding the TW a lot more enjoyable, but now there's options with the Cogent products getting into the mix. I preferred a shock that is a little bit stiffer, mostly due to being heavier than most riders as well as performance improvements in turns and off road, it really tightens up handling.

Just did a swap recently to assess wear on the bolts and shock itself, no excessive marring, no deformation of the bolts or attachment points, no signs of uneven wear.
 

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I do, it's made riding the TW a lot more enjoyable, but now there's options with the Cogent products getting into the mix. I preferred a shock that is a little bit stiffer, mostly due to being heavier than most riders as well as performance improvements in turns and off road, it really tightens up handling.

Just did a swap recently to assess wear on the bolts and shock itself, no excessive marring, no deformation of the bolts or attachment points, no signs of uneven wear.
How many miles on the shock?
 
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