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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
T.E. Lawrence had this to say about motorcycling.

A skittish motor-bike with a touch of blood in it is better than all the riding animals on earth, because of its logical extension of our faculties, and the hint, the provocation, to excess conferred by its honeyed untiring smoothness.

If you have that patience to wait, I will post a short story by him, it's a thriller about one of his ride aboard one of his Brough Superiors.
this is his account of the race with the Bristol aircraft:

'Once we so fled across the evening light, with the yellow sun on my left, when a huge shadow roared just overhead. A Bristol Fighter, from Whitewash Villas, our neighbour aerodrome, was banking sharply round. I checked speed an instant to wave: and the slip-stream of my impetus snapped my arm and elbow astern, like a raised flail. The pilot pointed down the road towards Lincoln. I sat hard in the saddle, folded back my ears and went away after him, like a dog after a hare. Quickly we drew abreast, as the impulse of his dive to my level exhausted itself.

The next mile of road was rough. I braced my feet into the rests, thrust with my arms, and clenched my knees on the tank till its rubber grips goggled under my thighs. Over the first pot-hole Boanerges screamed in surprise, its mud-guard bottoming with a yawp upon the tyre. Through the plunges of the next ten seconds I clung on, wedging my gloved hand in the throttle lever so that no bump should close it and spoil our speed. Then the bicycle wrenched sideways into three long ruts: it swayed dizzily, wagging its tail for thirty awful yards. Out came the clutch, the engine raced freely: Boa checked and straightened his head with a shake, as a Brough should.

The bad ground was passed and on the new road our flight became birdlike. My head was blown out with air so that my ears had failed and we seemed to whirl soundlessly between the sun-gilt stubble fields. I dared, on a rise, to slow imperceptibly and glance sideways into the sky. There the Bristol was, two hundred yards and more back. Play with the fellow? Why not? I slowed to ninety: signalled with my hand for him to overtake. Slowed ten more: sat up. Over he rattled. His passenger, a helmeted and goggled grin, hung out of the cock-pit to pass me the 'Up yer' RAF randy greeting.

They were hoping I was a flash in the pan, giving them best. Open went my throttle again. Boa crept level, fifty feet below: held them: sailed ahead into the clean and lonely country. An approaching car pulled nearly into its ditch at the sight of our race. The Bristol was zooming among the trees and telegraph poles, with my scurrying spot only eighty yards ahead. I gained though, gained steadily: was perhaps five miles an hour the faster. Down went my left hand to give the engine two extra dollops of oil, for fear that something was running hot: but an overhead JAP twin, super-tuned like this one, would carry on to the moon and back, unfaltering.
 

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One of the best dudes ever old TE. Not told in history books why he was discriminated against. Man was gay in time when that
was not acceptable. If you've the time, his book Seven Pillars of Wisdom is informative. Under rating Arab Nations is nothing new.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
His homosexuality was not ever proven. It may not have even existed. The accusations were the result of his having been raped while imprisoned by Turks who used this as a military method of inflicting humiliation upon captured enemies, particularly officers. It did not mean that they were gay, merely that they had been raped.
click on and read this.
First World War.com - Feature Articles - The Disputed Sexuality of T.E. Lawrence

The public accusations were never made until 20 years after his death because then he could not refute them.
Accusations made by cowards don't count.
 

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he did die in an accident on his bristol. too fast for the conditions, he crested a hill and couldn't see others on the road ahead and ditched to the side. no helmet didn't help.
ATGATT.
 

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When I read his book it seemed pretty clear he was quite differing in his views than the norm of the time. Only a homophobe could think that being homosexual could reduce the heroism of anyone. Pretty sad statement for humanity that it's even an issue. As I understand it, the Arab people were more tolerant of homosexuality than Christian's , certainly less homophobic. I just feel it's truly a travesty that a great man goes quietly into history books with his song mostly unsung due to homophobia.
 
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