TW200 Forum banner

1 - 20 of 36 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
512 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Good morning all. I know there are a lot of seasoned motorcycle camping folks on this site, but as for me, I haven't camped since I was a kid, and always hated it. Now, I love the outdoors, but I still have not camped since I was a little guy, and want to try it again. In fact, as part of my winter TW200 upgrades purchases, camping gear is going to be part of it. I'm only as far as purchasing a tent, but other stuff will follow.



In fact, not only am I going to be camping for the first time since I was a kid, and also on my own, but another milestone is the whole long trip deal on a motorcycle. My motorcycling hasn't taken me any farther than 50 or so miles from home at the farthest, mainly because I never really had a completely dependable bike, but now that I have the TW, I'm ready for it.



This Spring, I plan to do a 500-mile round trip around the Illinois River Scenic Byway, and plan to do it in three days so I have plenty of time to veer off of it to see what's around, which is what I've always done even with car travel. This is the reason that I almost always opt to travel on local highways instead of interstates. You just never know what you'll see.



Anyhow, I suppose the advice that I am looking for is what the heck do I do with the bike once I'm snugly packed away in my tent? Do you guys put some kind of a lock on it? Also, with all the crap strapped to the bike while I am in my tent, or in a restaurant or whatnot, what do I do with all the crap strapped to the bike? Do you guys just leave it unattended like that, just carrying your valuables with you?



I know these bikes aren't exactly the top 10 stolen bikes in the world, but I know that two or three guys can quietly and easily pick it up and carry it away. Maybe I'm just paranoid, but I don't trust people I don't know (and some I do know, the joys of living in Chicagoland I guess), and I don't carry a cellular telephone, so I'd be stranded with nothing if the bike was taken and a long walk home.



Anyhow, thanks for all your advice.



Dan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
190 Posts
well i know some people use the removable cases like the jcwhitney travel trunk. spudrider uses it and has bragged on its dependability. i would definetly run a good thick chain through my wheels wheen sleeping or parking in a stange place. also i would get a cheap cell phone even if it is prepaid. or spot locator or something incase of an emergency. also if you are by yourself make sure you have good personal protection.





be safe shawn
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,369 Posts
Get a window seat at restaurants.



Take reasonable precautions. Drag your gear into your tent with you at night. Lock your steering. Get insurance or an alarm, if it makes you feel better, but don't obsess over this stuff or it'll take all the joy out of traveling.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
614 Posts
I used to have the same concerns as you. But I have found it is usually safe to leave stuff on the bike during the day in more quiet rural areas, cities would worry me. I am of course in Europe so it may be different for you but human nature is the same the world over and I find country folk to be generally honest and kind.

Enjoy your trip and try not too worry about it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,621 Posts
I've got a decent alarm on my bike http://www.amazon.co...r/dp/B000GVIOPQ

I mounted the brain box where the stock tool kit used to sit. You can set the shock sensor to go off from a whisper to a hard hit. It will also go off if your ignition is turned on or the bike is taken off the side stand. Siren is really loud.

I leave the alarm on all the time when my bike is in the garage and I haven't had a false alarm yet.



I caught someone looking to open my action packer when I was inside a gas station (silly mountain gas stations can't afford pumps with a credit card reader on them). I heard the bike chirp and looked out the window to see a kid quickly walking away from the bike empty handed looking at the ground.

Same goes for if I had my molle pack on the bike, you can't get the pack open without setting off at least a warning chirp. The alarm keeps random people from sitting on my bike when I ride it to work. I've never walked up to a cool bike and sat on it without asking the owner first.




[media]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tTLEdY4xf1c[/media]



[media]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q8LGNibXN5U[/media]
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
652 Posts
Dan:

Give some second thoughts the cellphone, it can be your lifeline on the road. There are lots of things I can do without, but a cell phone is not one of them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
590 Posts
As I park my bike on the street and saw someone had jimmied with the ignition once I have one of these alarms now:



http://www.lockalarm.com/lockalarmcablelo.html



Seems to work well. Very visible, which I like.



Did a bunch of trips with my bikes over the years, including a 5 month cross Canada trip, and no problems. Had the same fears starting out, but nothing ever came to pass. With the soft luggage stopped in a parking lot during the day I'll put the rain covers on and strap them down a bit better sometimes, maybe put the big boots in a garbage bag to keep them out of sight.



Overnight, as noted a tent big enough to keep stuff inside is useful.



Definately keep valuables and money on person.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,704 Posts
I did the entire length (N_S) of Illinois on the Mississippi River trail/route on a bicycle which was equally vulnerable to theft etc. Basically you don't let anything that you can't live without (money, camera, etc.) out of your sight for more than a few seconds, but most of the stuff for camping, etc. is replacable and should not be allowed to ruin your trip with undue worry. The MC has a great deal of mobility so you don't have to carry as much food, water, or gear as you might on a bicycle. You want a good tent (wet is not good, even if it comes from condensation on the inside), and cold is not fun (get a good bag and keep it clean and dry, and off the ground with a decent sleeping pad). Clean that campsite before you put the tent down to avoid damage to the floor. I'd have something in the way of a chain through the swingarm and rear tire (I have a U shaped lock or a rectangular one made by the Club folks (for motorcycle or bicycle). By and large parking the bike where its visible to others is a better deterant than hiding it where someone can tamper with it unseen (after they watch you walk away). Campgrounds in State Parks etc. by and large are safe and most folks there totally trustworthy. Don't camp at rest areas or riverside ad hoc spots where you are more vulnerable to the local boozers or crazys. Just relax and follow your own good common sense and you will have a blast. My idea of the minimalist stove for tea and soup but not much more is a can of sterno and the little stove to hold a pan above it. You can replace along the road and create a meal to stave off starvation until the next cafe, but if you really want to cook you will want something better. I cleared out my garage a year or so ago, and gave about 7 backpack tents to the local scout troop. Each had its own use or advantages, so think about what weather, what size, and what price you have before you plunk down your money on a tent (some are better than others). Good luck and have fun. Tom
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
464 Posts
Dan with regard to bike security, the only thing I do when I stop (restaurant, rest area, scenic spot, etc) is remove my GPS and then I put a motorcycle cover over the bike. In over 30 years I have never had a problem with theft. At night everything goes into the tent vestibule or I take it into the motel with me and the bike steering lock is engaged and the bike again is covered.



Also use your instincts-If a place feels uncomfortable to you don't stay there move on to another spot.



With regard to gear-your going to get lots of advice.



I suggest you go to a site like REI (or comparable stores) that have lots of good pre purchase information about the gear that they sell.



For example--You will learn that there are tents and stove and sleeping bags for all kinds of purposes. Some gear is great for short trips and some better for longer and expeditionary uses.



By reading the REI reviews on gear you will learn much. I learned years ago from REI that- down insulates well until it gets wet. Thus in wet climates wool and synthetic fibers might be a better choice. Also down compacts much better than synthetic fibers. ETC etc.



For my personal preferences on shorter trips (less than one week) between June and early September; my favorite tent is the REI half dome, the stove is the JetBoil, and my sleeping bag is a light weight 2lb fiber fill which packs up real small.



I have a gear loft in the garage; there I have 5 tents for different types of trips-short trips, long trips, spring, summer, and winter tents, and tents when my wife or son go along--I have 4 different stoves-on longer trips I prefer stoves that can use lots of different fuels, short trips I like a small convenient gas cartridge stove (they a much cleaner and easier to use-but fuel cartridges are expensive and can be hard to locate on the road). Type of stove is also influenced by what you like to cook. A JetBoil is great for boiling water-so if you like freeze dried foods, water for tea or coffee the JetBoil is perfect. But freeze dried foods are expensive and if you like eggs and pancakes for breakfast the JetBoil is not the best choice. Again REI does a good job of evaluating stoves (BTU rating, etc) and their function.



In general-I would suggest you go light and practice packing your gear several times before your trip.



Additionally-l try to keep the total weight of your gear between 60-120 lbs depending how long the trip is. Motorcycle camping is much like hiking only take what you are willing to carry on your back---is a good rule of thumb. The heavier the bike the harder it is to handle when the riding gets a bit more technical.



Good luck on your travels and enjoy your travels.



Mike



PS Gear is a very personal choice- the way you ride, where you ride, etc all will influence the gear that you will select.

Also go to the ADV Forum they have lots on this topic.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
240 Posts
Sierratradingpost.com can be another good source for quality camping equipment. They're a discounter marketing overstocks, previous models, etc. I've purchased a long list of equipment and clothing from them for use in the high country of Colorado. I absolutely cannot afford carrying equipment that doesn't perform under difficult circumstances. Sierra would be a good place to explore.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
512 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Thanks for all the advice, guys. It really does help. I may look into that Gorilla alarm. I had a talking one years ago in a car, and it was easy to install, and worked well. So, since I already know the brand, I may stick with that. Since this is my first camping experience in many, many years, I am definitely going to stay at actual camp grounds. May as well make my "first" experience a good one. As far as gear goes, I've got a pretty good idea as to what to look for. I have a friend who camps with his wife every chance he gets. Of course, he camps via car, but he gave me a pretty good idea what to look for. Of course, all your advice does mean a lot to me since you all have different camping experience than he does.



I guess some of your advice should have been obvious to me, but I guess I'm just over-thinking things like I always do.



Well, once Spring gets here and I'm ready to go, I'll definitely do a ride report, not that I'm going anywhere special, but I enjoy reading all the ones you all post, so I am more than happy to write one up.



Thanks again,

Dan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
Just go and do the trip. Don't get your fears all wrapped around the axle. I have ridden from coast to coast several times and down through Mexico and Central America to Costa Rica twice. Never had an alarm, just removed the valuables at night. Met lots of friendly folks. Do it. A long solo motorcycle trip will change your life.



Bob
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
10,664 Posts
Trying to be totally self-sufficient on a first short motocamping trip is a good way to ruin the trip. I'd plan on the moto part and camping part and let the cooking part go for the first trip. Stop along the way for meals.



I'm not a big fan of expensive camping gear. I have a 4-person dome, a self-inflating sleeping pad, and a flat sleeping bag, all from Walmart. Due to the extra room and better ventilation of a bigger tent, I'm as comfortable as anyone in any tent. If the weather turns nasty, I get a motel room. Any motel room is more comfortable than any tent during blizzards and monsoons. If I was doing extended wilderness travel, things would be different, but I'm not, so they aren't.



Bolt a Rubbermaid box atop your back fender. Load in the stuff you rarely use, like tools and spare parts. Atop that stuff, pack that which you only need when the tent is set up, like your shower stuff and camp sneakers. Note there is still room in the Rubbermaid box for a small stove, fuel, and a stash of food.



Walmart sells reasonable priced waterproof canoe bags. Get 2. One will hold a sleeping bag and pad. It will hold two sleeping bags to double up in cool season. Room enough for rain gear, too.



The second canoe bag is for clothes. Roll together a complete suit of threads--jeans, shirt, undies, and socks. Repeat. Repeat. Place rolls in a garbage bag. Stuff them in the canoe sack. Stuff in a second garbage bag for dirty cloths. Top with a sweatshirt or windbreaker for chilly evenings.



Load a tank bag with things you use during the day, like meds, maps, flashlights, engine oil, camera, toilet paper. Rig a strap so you can carry the tank bag as your man purse.



Bunjie the canoe bags atop the Rubbermaid box. Bunjie the tent in front of the Rubbermaid box. Mount the tank bag on the tank.



Have a nice ride.



 
  • Like
Reactions: kince

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
652 Posts
Great advice qwerty. You don't use panniers, thoughts there?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
144 Posts
As others have noted, camp in a regular campground (not roadside park) for a greater measure of security, take valuables like cameras with you if you leave the tent unattended, and help keep basically honest people honest by locking your bike. I carry a thick, plastic coated cable and good padlock to chain the bikes wheel/frame (I also will sometimes chain it to another bike/picnic table/ pole/ etc.... ). I carry a smaller diameter cable and lock to chain my coat and helmet to the bike if I'm in an area like a restaurant/museum/store/public street in a good area.



Over the years I've had good results from a couple rubberized/waterproof bags and some specialized packing straps. My largest bag is an Ortlieb dry duffle which I use to carry my tent system, a heavy-duty ground cloth or plastic for under the tent (dont' let it extend out past the edge of the tent or it will catch and funnel water under the tent!), an inflatable twin-size bed and compressor to blow it up (works off of the bikes battery), small battery operated light, etc.... I got my Ortlieb years ago through Aerostich, and it is made out of a very heavy duty, rubberized fabric. As shown here, it has a roll-type closure along the entire length, which makes it very easy to access the contents: http://www.aerostich...uffel-bags.html



My other bag was originally made by a BMW rider who started making the bags and selling them at BMW rallys under the brand name Helen Twowheels. She sold the company to a couple other BMW riders a few years ago, but the product itself looks unchanged on the new company's website. The bags and her straps were always very popular with the long distance touring crowd. Like the Ortlieb bag, it is also a roll-type closure along its entire length. It is made of a heavy cordura nylon with a rubberized interior. The exterior has numerous loops sewed into a nylon reflective strip along the side of the bag. Your packing straps go through these loops to keep the bag from shifing position when secured to the rack of your bike, and multiple bags are easily secured to each other and the bike. My Ortlieb doesn't have these loops, so I run my straps through the carrying handles--- better than nothing. I really like the Helen Twowheels packing straps also--- strong nylon, but soft enough not to ruin the paint on your rack. The D-ring style connectors allow your bags to be cinched down TIGHT, don't vibrate or stretch loose, and can easily be undone to remove your bags. This website explains the bags and straps, as well as a tutorial on how to pack: http://cdn.racerpart...enTwowheels.pdf A mesh bag can be used for your wet towels or clothing---the sun and wind from riding will help dry things.



I have a couple tents. A three-man Kelty dome tent which will hold two twin-sized air beds, and a Eureka two-man which packs up smaller and will hold a single twin-size air bed. I use an electric inflator that hooks into a 12v cigarette lighter socket. I haven't camped yet with my TW, so the airbed and inflator may be a problem given the TW's small battery (although anybody at a campground would probably let you plug into their car's powerport for a couple minutes). I've got a bad back, so the therma-rest style pads are not my first choice.



My tents have zip-corded multi-section fiberglass tent poles which makes setup and takedown quick. They both have removable rain flys for privacy / rain protection, but have a mesh tent roof and windows for good ventilation in hot weather. You can leave the rain-fly off if you want to see the stars. I usually prefer the larger tent because I can sit up and change clothes easier, bring everything inside at night, etc.... My smaller two-man tent is pictured. Give some thought to high quality tent stakes. I currently use some very heavy-duty stainless wire stakes which I can push into midwest soil pretty easily by hand. Large plastic ones are bulky and hard to hammer in the ground, and I have bent numerous aluminum or mild-steel ones when they've hit an underground root or rock. This website explains some pros and cons: http://www.hiking-ge...ent-stakes.html



I've attached a few photos of the gear strapped to my old Beemer: the red Helen Twowheels straps hold down the Ortleib and Twowheels bags. A Cycoactive Bar Pack works great instead of a large tankbag: http://www.cycoactiv...apcase-080-0030 A couple good bungees hold down a cheap collapsible cooler (its blue in the photo, and great for setting up evening camp--just add some ice and your favorite beverage/food). I usually also strap a cheap mesh safety vest (orange with reflective yellow stripes) across the rear--- it greatly increases your visibility to traffic coming up behind you. Whatever you strap on your bike, make sure it won't come loose: you don't want to lose your stuff, or kill yourself by having something come loose and getting caught in your chain/wheel.











 

·
Registered
Joined
·
369 Posts
I couldn't even make it through this thread. You own a $2,000 motorcycle at best, I do not lock up anything. If a theif wants it guess what they are going to get it. I don't lock up any of my Harleys here in Illinois and never worry about a thing. The only thing you have to worry about is paranoia. If your hoteling, tell them you need a handicap room so you can roll the bike in if it is that big of a concern. This is whats wrong with the world too many people worried about their material things, this is what insurance is for. If you have no regular cell phone go to Dollar General and get a Trac Phone they cost next to nothing and they are great piece of mind. Secondly program my number, I can help you should anything go afoul. Third have a good time and don't sweat the small things. Life is too short and you need to have a good time with your trip pm me I'm two hours south and have some cool trails to ride when you set off on your journey. Plus I have a tent shower and tarp and an extra lot you can use so you won't have to unpack yours or worry about a place to stay.



P.S. It doesn't take two guys to put a TW in the back of a truck, I'm 198 lbs and wrestle mine in there just fine.



In Glock We Trust.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
10,664 Posts
Great advice qwerty. You don't use panniers, thoughts there?


Hard panniers offroad on small bikes with somewhat cramped ergos break legs. I have a set of soft bags but the exhaust is on the way, and a lack of dual shocks to keep them out of the rear tire would be a problem even with a low pipe. The luggage rack I'm building has removable racks designed to keep the soft bags off the muffler and out of the rear tire.



Simply put, camping in the rain really isn't what sucks. Setting in a tent isn't exactly the most comfortable thing to do, and sitting there hour after hour just to keep dry sucks. Getting rained on is no big deal if you plan to sit there until the sun comes out to dry the gear. An all night rain isn't even a big deal if you plan to leave the gear to dry and return later (base camping). Breaking camp with wet gear sucks. That means making camp that night with wet gear. Wet gear sucks. Wet gear is wet gear no matter what it costs. It still sucks.



Seems to me a lot of people don't go motocamping because they are led to believe that they need lots of expensive gear that they can't afford. Getting started, it just ain't so. Beginners should keep an eye on the weather forecast and not push their luck. I've found that the best gear is useless if the user doesn't know how to use it properly. I've also found that I've been perfectly comfortable spending the night in the wilderness with no camping gear at all, but that's an extreme in the opposite direction from camping in a $1.5million RV, and I've done that, too.



TK200 is right, don't sweat the small stuff. Unless you plan to camp in extreme weather conditions, or you're willing to pay the big bucks to save 0.13 ounce of weight on one product so you can pile on another doo-dad, the cheap stuff fromn Walmart is fine. Keep it simple, keep it cheap, and don't worry about it. Thieves generally avoid campsites with Walmart tents, for obvious reasons. You can upgrade bit by bit later, as the cheap stuff wears out, if you really decide you like motocamping. Truth is, most motocampers only camp a few nights, then they spend one night in a motel, anyway. Every now and then, a real bed becons.



Let's look at some examples. premium backpacking tent the size of mine will go for $250-$300. Mine was $20 on sale. That difference is 5 or 6 nights in a motel. Figure 2-3 nights difference on sleeping bags, and 1-2 nights difference on a sleeping pad. Add in 2 nights difference between my tin can cooker and a backpacking stove, and the 1 night difference each between Walmart and name-brand canoe bags, and for the money I saved getting cheaper but equally functional gear, I can stay in motels 14 nights. Actually, if you stay in camp grounds, my experience is that a campsite runs about 1/3 the cost of a motel room, so with campsite fees added in, that's 18 nights in a motel for the same money as camping with premium equipment. That's more stormy nights than I've needed in 40 years of occasional motocamping.



Now, if you are planning 60 nights/year motocamping, or riding to Alaska or Chile, that's different.



In .45ACP we trust.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
369 Posts
Hard panniers offroad on small bikes with somewhat cramped ergos break legs. I have a set of soft bags but the exhaust is on the way, and a lack of dual shocks to keep them out of the rear tire would be a problem even with a low pipe. The luggage rack I'm building has removable racks designed to keep the soft bags off the muffler and out of the rear tire.



Simply put, camping in the rain really isn't what sucks. Setting in a tent isn't exactly the most comfortable thing to do, and sitting there hour after hour just to keep dry sucks. Getting rained on is no big deal if you plan to sit there until the sun comes out to dry the gear. An all night rain isn't even a big deal if you plan to leave the gear to dry and return later (base camping). Breaking camp with wet gear sucks. That means making camp that night with wet gear. Wet gear sucks. Wet gear is wet gear no matter what it costs. It still sucks.



Seems to me a lot of people don't go motocamping because they are led to believe that they need lots of expensive gear that they can't afford. Getting started, it just ain't so. Beginners should keep an eye on the weather forecast and not push their luck. I've found that the best gear is useless if the user doesn't know how to use it properly. I've also found that I've been perfectly comfortable spending the night in the wilderness with no camping gear at all, but that's an extreme in the opposite direction from camping in a $1.5million RV, and I've done that, too.



TK200 is right, don't sweat the small stuff. Unless you plan to camp in extreme weather conditions, or you're willing to pay the big bucks to save 0.13 ounce of weight on one product so you can pile on another doo-dad, the cheap stuff fromn Walmart is fine. Keep it simple, keep it cheap, and don't worry about it. Thieves generally avoid campsites with Walmart tents, for obvious reasons. You can upgrade bit by bit later, as the cheap stuff wears out, if you really decide you like motocamping. Truth is, most motocampers only camp a few nights, then they spend one night in a motel, anyway. Every now and then, a real bed becons.



Let's look at some examples. premium backpacking tent the size of mine will go for $250-$300. Mine was $20 on sale. That difference is 5 or 6 nights in a motel. Figure 2-3 nights difference on sleeping bags, and 1-2 nights difference on a sleeping pad. Add in 2 nights difference between my tin can cooker and a backpacking stove, and the 1 night difference each between Walmart and name-brand canoe bags, and for the money I saved getting cheaper but equally functional gear, I can stay in motels 14 nights. Actually, if you stay in camp grounds, my experience is that a campsite runs about 1/3 the cost of a motel room, so with campsite fees added in, that's 18 nights in a motel for the same money as camping with premium equipment. That's more stormy nights than I've needed in 40 years of occasional motocamping.



Now, if you are planning 60 nights/year motocamping, or riding to Alaska or Chile, that's different.



In .45ACP we trust.




Heres another little trick I learned so you can leave the tin can cooker at home and get just a little more packing room. Punch a dent in the can and put it on your exhaust header let it sit for a little while and you have yourself a conduction heater.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
144 Posts
The only thing you have to worry about is paranoia. This is whats wrong with the world too many people worried about their material things, this is what insurance is for.


Why have insurance if you're not worried about material things?



I had a Yamaha XT600 wheeled out of my driveway at 3:00 in the afternoon, in a neighborhood on a busy street, while I was inside the house watching TV. Anyone who saw the thief probably just thought he was pushing a broke-down bike. Not much fun making police reports, and then trying to convince the insurance adjuster that my bike had recently had hundreds of dollars of work done on it (carb overhaul, fork seals, rear rack, etc.....), and therefore I should get the upper end of the blue book value---which still meant taking a big loss. Then trying to find another semi-reliable used bike to replace it in time not to lose the entire riding season was no fun either. Thank God it wasn't stolen while I was hundreds of miles from home, leaving me stranded in Bumf**k, USA.



You are right about any bike being stolen if someone is dead set on it, but I now work on the principle that cabling my bike's wheel while I'm sleeping, and at least locking my forks at other times if I will be out of sight of the bike, might just be enough to make a thief move on to an easier target. Given my previous profession and the amount of stolen property reports I have taken, I should have been doing it all along. I wouldn't leave my wallet and cell phone laying in plain sight on the front seat of my car, and I shouldn't have made my bike/gear such an easy target either.



Regarding tents and camping equipment, I would recommend borrowing stuff from friends at first in order to see what features you like. Believe me when I say that I am CHEAP, but I have found certain features that I really like (and of course alot depends on your intended usage), and you don't have to spend a fortune to get some of them. I like plenty of ventilation for those hot/humid Midwestern summer nights, mesh ceiling pockets to hold a battery powered light in, or to throw my glasses in so I don't roll over onto them in my sleep. Weather is quickly changable, and I used to go to scheduled BMW rallys around the country--- the vacation trip couldn't be postponed for better weather. I therefore like my freestanding tents (the poles hold it up without staking) so I can use it under a campground's picnic shelter or inside an animal barn if the rally was held at a fairgrounds. I like my shock-corded tent poles so that everything goes up or down quickly when the weather is nasty, or you roll into camp after dark. An extended rainfly that forms a little vestibule/overhang is nice so you can leave your muddy boots/wet stuff outside. The little Eureka Apex tent like the one in my picture meets these criteria and at a little over $100 retail (currently $67 on Amazon) can give you an idea of what is out there: http://www.amazon.co...t/dp/B000EQCVQ6



And as Qwerty has mentioned (and my personal preference the older I get) there have been plenty of times that I have found a cheap 'mom and pop' motel and the tent never left its bag: no loud drunks or screaming kids camped next to you, and there's nothing like air conditioning/heat, your own clean bathroom, TV, etc.... to keep you refreshed for the next day's adventures.



Corey
 
1 - 20 of 36 Posts
Top