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Discussion Starter #1
Just signed up the wife for the novice course here in Ridgefield Wa. Luckily her brother just lives down the road a piece so she can stay with him for the training.

She has been riding sporadicly with me on pavement at 25 or less mph. I am going to leave it up to the instructors. I don't think I will go. It might be too painful to watch lol. I do hope she comes back with smiles and a license. Would be nice to be able to go to some functions and meet some fellow tdubers.

After riding with a few saturday a week ago, I am trying to get her up to speed to join us.
 

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My girlfriend took the MSF course last weekend and did pretty well. She had not ridden much prior to the class and by the time it was over she knows how to operate the clutch pretty good, shift and stop. I did not stay for the class at all, not because i didn't want to watch but i thought it would make her nervous and i didn't think the instructions would really want an audience. I did swing by for lunch and they were riding on the range and she was doing great and having fun. she was so nervous going into the class but now she cant wait to ride the TW again. Im trying to bring her along slowly and safe, so far so good.
 

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My wife wanted to learn to ride. I made a deal with her that if she wanted to ride she had to take a safety course and I would go take it with her (so she wouldn't have to go alone). She bought a 2002 TW and I have been working with her on pulling out and shifting and we are scheduled to take the course the last week in April.
 

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When I took my course (which is required in FL to get your MC license), there was a woman in the class whose husband hung out and watched most of both days. He had been riding for years, and just watched, letting the instructors do their job. Out of all the students, she was the only one to fall (during the practice riding), and it was a violent looking fall, though she was fine, just rattled. Her husband showed pretty good restraint, and stopped himself from running out to help her. The instructors did a great job helping her get her confidence back throughout the rest of the weekend. It paid off, as she had the highest combined score (she beat me out by 1 point!).

I gotta say I didn't mind the husband hanging out all day, he was pretty cool and chatted with us during our breaks.
 

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When my wife decided she wanted her own bike I insisted she take the course. Fortunately I work for a motorcycle dealership and we have a Harley dealership right next door so I was able to get her into the HD Riders Edge course at employee cost. She hated the Buell Blast but I told her if she could ride that beat up POS then she could ride anything. :p
 

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As a former instructor I can tell you even if you have ridden for awhile there are still things to learn at a beginners course. Lots of times you will discover some unknown bad habits and how to correct them.
 

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My gf and I just attended the riders edge course at HD.... Awesome course, learned a lot and experienced a lot. we both passed! Should hopefully get our endorsements next Tuesday


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

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Everyone should be required to take the BRC, no matter what name it is marketed under. Highly recommend a follow-up with the offroad rider course just to develop the necessary skills to deal with the teenage texter drifting into your lane and forcing you off the road. Even heavy cruisers and baggers are amazingly capable in the dirt under a knowledgeable rider who never gives up. Finally, after a few thousand miles or a few hundred thousand miles on the street or a couple hundred hours of parking lot practice, the advanced course will take any rider to the next level. I think multilevel licensing and training required is a good idea that will save many lives.
 

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That and requiring every new driver to spend a year behind the wheel of a rally car with a passing grade before being issued a license. Damm Kid will be having way to much fun to be texting.
 

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Kids in rally cars? Oh, heck no. Grandparents in rally cars would be much better. Kids should only be allowed to drive vehicles they bought with money they earned themselves. Those are the kids who rarely get in trouble on the road.
 

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Kids in rally cars? Oh, heck no. Grandparents in rally cars would be much better. Kids should only be allowed to drive vehicles they bought with money they earned themselves. Those are the kids who rarely get in trouble on the road.
Jeez, it only took me 30 years to learn that!:p
 

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Well folks, it didn't go well. After paying for them to get her up to speed, they sent her packing saying she didn't have enough experience to take the class. Oh well, I think it might tick her off enough to ride more and be able to handle the bike better. It was a good thing though. Gave her a good visit with her brother and a nice easter dinner with her family.
 

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Glad that attitude isn't pervasive. Like a hunter safety course. "Gee, little Jimmy, you don't shoot fer crap. How about you take your guns out in the woods and play with 'em for a few months and then come back and we'll teach you to be safe."
 

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My wife takes her safety course in May
She has never ridden a motorcycle. She doesnt even drive a manual car. Im very nervous and wish she wouldnt,but at the same time I have to stand behind her.
She wants to learn something new...who am I to ruin that for her?
We went over the msf book and she knows all of it. Should I be showing her the friction zone and the power walk. Or should I leave it up to the instructors? Thanks
 

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Should I be showing her the friction zone and the power walk. Or should I leave it up to the instructors?
Based on my experience from a long marriage, I'd say let the instructors do it. She can't divorce the instructors, and the instructors don't make your supper.
 

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Based on my experience from a long marriage, I'd say let the instructors do it. She can't divorce the instructors, and the instructors don't make your supper.


That's good advice...you can be the one with the answers when she's ready to ask you
 

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Well folks, it didn't go well. After paying for them to get her up to speed, they sent her packing saying she didn't have enough experience to take the class. Oh well, I think it might tick her off enough to ride more and be able to handle the bike better. It was a good thing though. Gave her a good visit with her brother and a nice easter dinner with her family.
I am sorry to hear that Plumb.

I used to be an MSF instructor and successfully trained hundreds of new riders who had never been on a motorcycle before. I actually only had to bounce one rider after the first few drills because I felt he was putting other students at risk by not being able to control his motorcycle. I suggested that he spend some time working on his balance skills by riding a bicycle and then return in a few weeks to try the course again.

I would suggest that your wife spend some time practicing some slow speed drills in a parking lot. We had a lot of students who had been riding on the street for years, but had a hard time with some of the slow speed drills that make up the bulk of the Basic Rider Course. I do not know the particulars of your wife's experience, but it is actually easier to teach someone with no experience than someone who may have already picked up some bad habits.

I hope this is helpful,

Brian
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Thank you all for the good input. I just had a talk with her to know what took place. There was a narrow area she had to work with and couldn't keep within the boundarys. Like you said, slow work. Anyway the instructor told her that things would pick up and he didn't figure she would be up to it. far as I am concerned, as long as she wasn't a hazard to herself or others she paid the money to take the course. He should have let her just do her best.
 
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