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Discussion Starter #1
Want to buy a mule magnetic oil drain plug to replace the stock on on 87' TW 200.





Help!!!!!!!!!!



I have noticed a few people on the fourm have upgraded to a magnetic drain plug. I need a link to where I can buy on on the web.
 

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Mule was a member of the old forum who made the magnetic drain plugs himself.



I don't believe he has registered on the new forum, at least not under the same screen name.



He had his TW stolen, and may no longer be on the forum.



jb
 

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Just make one yourself..
Costs less then $7.00



Directions from the old forum below

http://tw200forum.co...3/ShowPost.aspx





But as Mrgizmow pointed out a while back, hot oil will weaken most magnets. My neodymium magnet is about half of what is was after 800 miles.







Side note:

If you take a high power neodymium magnet and get it close to your standard refrigerator magnet it will demagnetize them. My wife can't figure out why her ugly fridge magnets "loose their sticky".







Neodymium Iron Boron

Neodymium Iron Boron (NdFeB) is another type of rare earth magnetic material. This material has similar properties as the Samarium Cobalt except that it is more easily oxidized and generally doesn't have the same temperature resistance. NdFeB magnets also have the highest energy products approaching 50MGOe. These materials are costly and are generally used in very selective applications due to the cost. Cost is also driven by existing intellectual property rights of the developers of this type of magnet. Their high energy products lend themselves to compact designs that result in innovative applications and lower manufacturing costs. NdFeB magnets are highly corrosive. Surface treatments have been developed that allow them to be used in most applications. These treatments include gold, nickel, zinc and tin plating and epoxy resin coating.









Samarium Cobalt

Samarium cobalt is a type of rare earth magnet material that is highly resistant to oxidation, has a higher magnetic strength and temperature resistance than Alnico or Ceramic material. Introduced to the market in the 1970's, samarium cobalt magnets continue to be used today. Samarium cobalt magnets are divided into two main groups: Sm1Co5 and Sm2Co17 (commonly referred to as 1-5 and 2-17). The energy product range for the 1-5 series is 15 to 22 MGOe, with the 2-17 series falling between 22 and 32 MGOe. These magnets offer the best temperature characteristics of all rare earth magnets and can withstand temperatures up to 300° C. Sintered samarium cobalt magnets are brittle and prone to chipping and cracking and may fracture when exposed to thermal shock. Due to the high cost of the material samarium, samarium cobalt magnets are used for applications where high temperature and corrosion resistance is critical.







Alnico

Alnico magnets are made up of a composite of aluminum, nickel and cobalt with small amounts of other elements added to enhance the properties of the magnet. Alnico magnets have good temperature stability, good resistance to demagnetization due to shock but they are easily demagnetized. Alnico magnets are produced by two typical methods, casting or sintering. Sintering offers superior mechanical characteristics, whereas casting delivers higher energy products (up to 5.5 MGOe) and allows for the design of intricate shapes. Two very common grades of Alnico magnets are 5 and 8. These are anisotropic grades and provide for a preferred direction of magnetic orientation. Alnico magnets have been replaced in many applications by ceramic and rare earth magnets.





+1 To Island Jimmy's link below
 

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Hello

no need to make one, as long as they're normal metric dimensions you can find them easily in Japan, brands are Kitaco, Daytona, Kijima, CF Posh etc...

Cheers
 

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Neodynium nagnets are available from Northern Tool.
 
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