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Smaller ones like that are good. The rim is active.

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Just as long as phelonius is west of the Hilina Slump;)

Hilina Slump

The Hilina Slump is a 5,000 cubic mile (20,000 kilometre³) section of the Big Island of Hawaii on the south flank of the Kilauea volcano. Between 1990 and 1993, Global Positioning System measurements showed a southward displacement of the south flank of Kilauea up to approximately 10 centimeters per year.[SUP][1][/SUP] The slump has the potential of breaking away at a faster pace in the form of an underwater landslide. In Hawaii, landslides of this nature are called debris avalanches. If the entire Hilina Slump were to slide into the ocean at once, it could cause an earthquake in excess of a 9 in magnitude, and a megatsunami. Previous megatsunamis in Hawaii 110,000 years ago caused by similar geological phenomena may have created waves 1,600 feet (500 m) tall.[SUP][2][/SUP]
Geology[edit]

See also: Slope stability
The Hilina slump is sliding seaward on top of the southern flank of the Kilauea volcano, at an average speed of 10 cm/year. Kilauea is the southeastern portion, about 13.7%, of the Big Island of Hawaii. Compared to the 25,000 to 35,000 km[SUP]3[/SUP] volume of Kilauea, the submarine slide is between 10,000 and 12,000 km[SUP]3[/SUP], making up about 10% of the island.[SUP][3][/SUP] Model results based on present day slope and sea level suggest that earthquake accelerations stronger than about 0.4 to 0.6 g are enough to exceed the static friction coefficient resulting in a slip along a failure surface.[SUP][4][/SUP]However, recent undersea measurements show that an undersea "bench" has formed a buttress at the forefront of the Hilina Slump, and "this buttress may tend to reduce the likelihood of future catastrophic detachment."[SUP][5][/SUP][SUP][6][/SUP]
As the Pacific plate is being pushed to the west/northwest, it is traveling over a hot spot that is erupting silica poor basaltic magma. The Big Island of Hawaii is the youngest of the chain of Hawaiian shield volcanoes that have penetrated and scarred the overriding Pacific plate. Located on the eastern side of the Big Island, Kilauea and Mauna Loa are believed to be the only Hawaiian volcanoes still being fed on a large scale by the magma chambers below. Since the northeastern flank of the Hilina slump is still growing, the sliding southern flank of the slump may be experiencing friction resisting slope failure as the northeastern flank is pushing upwards. Once the northeast flank becomes inactive, and the resisting frictional force decreases, the Hilina slump may be more susceptible to submarine landslides caused by earthquakes.[SUP][3]
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Fortunately the resultant tsunami will not likely reach Illinois.

 

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Haha. We are doomed here in SD. Fred could be safe on the otherside of the Sierras..
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I am on the other end of the island from the Hilina slump. So if it slumps it will probable push the rest of the island WNW When it goes.
I hope to not be here when it goes. I should be leaving on the 5 March date. Where I willow I will only have to worry about a re occerrence
of the 9 magnitude one that shook the midwest before everything was built up there about 200 years or so ago.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
It did make an interesting wake up, but it was over in less than 10 seconds. When I was in Kodiak in 89 one woke me up with a lot more vigorous shaking that went on while I got dressed. It was still going on as I ran out the door. In Kodiak when that happens you always head for high ground as quick as you can. Kodiak has suffered some mega tsunamis
in the not too distant past. The worst was an epicenter in prince William Sound that washed away Kodiak homes even up on the main hill in town. It also washed away a huge amount of Anchorage and a lot a fishing villages. That one was the big one in the early sixties. It also hit Hawaii really hard with a lot of loss of life. The upper east coast of this island was devastated by that one all the way down past Hilo.
 

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I was 12 living on Oahu when that happened.
It did make an interesting wake up, but it was over in less than 10 seconds. When I was in Kodiak in 89 one woke me up with a lot more vigorous shaking that went on while I got dressed. It was still going on as I ran out the door. In Kodiak when that happens you always head for high ground as quick as you can. Kodiak has suffered some mega tsunamis
in the not too distant past. The worst was an epicenter in prince William Sound that washed away Kodiak homes even up on the main hill in town. It also washed away a huge amount of Anchorage and a lot a fishing villages. That one was the big one in the early sixties. It also hit Hawaii really hard with a lot of loss of life. The upper east coast of this island was devastated by that one all the way down past Hilo.
 
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