TW200 Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
592 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Bought a 1998 Loadrite trailer. Its a straight spindle no brakes
I took the hubs off to inspect bearings and races
All looks good accept I noticed it had no flat washers on either side behind the crown nut
Back of crown nuts have some light scoring wear bearings have rubbed
But bearings have no wear on the outside cage surface
Do I have to have a flat washer behind each crown nut?
Without having the washers I have about 3 full threads on axle showing with nut and cotter pin in place
Thanks for any info
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,663 Posts
I don't know about yours, but mine has a key way in the axle that a keyed washer goes on between the nut and bearing. The washer is keyed to keep it from spinning if the bearing happens to spin. Some don't have the keyed washer, just a plain washer. If your axle doesn't have a key way, a flat washer should work fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,663 Posts
I just did a quick search on trailer axles, here is a picture of a "keyless" axle and it shows a plain washer with it. LINK Any flat washer that fits well will be OK. But if you never put a washer in I don't think it would cause any problems either. If a flat washer spins, it will also spin against the nut.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
10,664 Posts
Yes, you should have a washer. Any flat washer that fits will NOT be okay. Use a Grade 5 or Grade 8 flat washer, grease flats lightly at install. Cheap Grade 2 washers are soft and will grind away quickly, contaminating the grease and ruining the bearings. Unless you have a real oddball bearing and hub set you can find replacements with tabs (if you have a groove) for just a couple dollars at any Northern Tool, Tractor Supply, or Rural King. Don't be too cheap or too lazy to do such a simple job right.

Bearings are very hard, they WILL wear the nuts. Worn bits contaminate the grease and contribute to bearing wear. Correct washers provide a smoother surface than the bottom of the nut and a wider contact area that reduces pressure and thus reduces wear.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,663 Posts
If the bearings are adjusted properly, the inner race of the bearing shouldn't be spinning on the shaft.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
234 Posts
This plus 1
Yes, you should have a washer. Any flat washer that fits will NOT be okay. Use a Grade 5 or Grade 8 flat washer, grease flats lightly at install. Cheap Grade 2 washers are soft and will grind away quickly, contaminating the grease and ruining the bearings. Unless you have a real oddball bearing and hub set you can find replacements with tabs (if you have a groove) for just a couple dollars at any Northern Tool, Tractor Supply, or Rural King. Don't be too cheap or too lazy to do such a simple job right.

Bearings are very hard, they WILL wear the nuts. Worn bits contaminate the grease and contribute to bearing wear. Correct washers provide a smoother surface than the bottom of the nut and a wider contact area that reduces pressure and thus reduces wear.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,663 Posts
I did a search to back up my opinion, couldn't find one, so I'm eating a little humble pie right now. Here is a pro washer view point. Link
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
10,664 Posts
If the bearings are adjusted properly, the inner race of the bearing shouldn't be spinning on the shaft.
Shouldn't, but often do rotate a tiny bit. If they are loose, take a black Sharpie to the spindle, let dry between layers. Tightens things up a bit. If they are tight, set bearings on a warm to the touch surface or in a barely warm oven to thermally expand a bit and they will slip right on, and when they cool they will be a tight fit.

Outer races should never move in the hub. It usually takes a driver to get them out, but some folks make do with a brass drift. If you don't have the proper driver to replace them, or even if you do, put the outer races in the freezer for an hour and they will drop right in, then expand as they warm up to a snug fit.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top