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Discussion Starter #1
I have been looking for a trailer that will haul 2 TWs and I would really appreciate help from any of you that know about bike trailers.



My basic considerations.



I would like a flatbed but could more easily justify having a trailer with sides because then it could also be used for general utility hauling.



I don’t want a trailer that is too big because it will take up too much room and require more gas to tow. (I was offered a free 6' x 12’ flatbed by a relative but turned it down because it was just a monster).



Trailer must have 13” wheels or larger.



The trailer needs to comfortably hold up to long distance trips when loaded with 2 bikes.






Below are two 4x8 foot trailers for sale in my area. Three questions:



1) Is a 4x8 foot trailer with sides wide enough to comfortably fit 2 TWs?



2) The first trailer only has a single box channel straight tongue while the other one has the straight tounge bar AND 2 diagonal side pieces. I heard a rumor that the trailers with only the single tongue piece are not stable enough – any truth to that?



3) Any thoughts on these two trailers? (both are 4x8):





13” wheels, 2000 lbs axle, 1380 lbs max load:





2” ball connection





Any thoughts on trailers would be appreciated. Thanks guys.
 

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I recommend a 5x8 with the gusseted tongue. ADD a tongue wheel, INSTALL several eye-bolts around all four sides of the perimeter, and get BOTH a spare tire and carrier. Avoid trailers that tilt. Look for the best tailgate "latch system" you can find. Badly designed tongues and poor tailgate latches are often why one trailer is cheaper than another. Be very cautious if you're considering using car tires. Depending upon the total weight in the trailer, car tires on trailers are time bombs.



5x8s are wide enough to accommodate 2 bikes loaded straight up, while still light enough to move by hand (with the tongue wheel!), and narrow enough to tuck in nice and neat behind the tow vehicle. Additionally, riding mowers with decks will fit in the 60" width often without having to tie up the discharge chute.



The gusseted tongue is strong enough so you can stand in the front corners of the trailer without the entire trailer warping under the offset added weight. Single tongue designs wiggle more than I care for, especially on rough unpaved roads.



I'm still using my 4x8 I bought at Lowes. FYI, we almost always load the first bike backwards. That way the handlebars never bang, and it is pretty easy to load AND unload the 2nd bike. And we've never had an issue with the 12 inch wheels / trailer only tires. Carry a spare! Use mil-spec tie-downs (with positive locking ends).



When I have the funds and can replace my 4x8, my choice will be a single axle wire floored 5x10, with a gusseted tongue, so there is room to mount a bed box upfront for storage.
 

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1) Is a 4x8 foot trailer with sides wide enough to comfortably fit 2 TWs? Yes.



2) The first trailer only has a single box channel straight tongue while the other one has the straight tounge bar AND 2 diagonal side pieces. I heard a rumor that the trailers with only the single tongue piece are not stable enough – any truth to that? I can't really speak to this topic with any professional knowledge, but I think either would be fine for your needs.



3) Any thoughts on these two trailers? (both are 4x8): I would pick the first one due to the lower sides and drop down ramp that will make it easier to load and secure the bikes. It also appears to be commercially made. As always, cost will also be a factor in your decision.





13” wheels, 2000 lbs axle, 1380 lbs max load:





2” ball connection





Any thoughts on trailers would be appreciated. Thanks guys.
 

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I have been looking for a trailer that will haul 2 TWs and I would really appreciate help from any of you that know about bike trailers.



Any thoughts on trailers would be appreciated. Thanks guys.


I'd look at the first carefully. Can you get both bikes to where it is? If not, take careful measurements and fake it on your garage floor with duct tape, bikes back to front, figuring out where the tie-down rings would have to go, then go back and figure if you could actually put them in the floor where needed. (Frame members might cause problems) Four tie-downs per bike ARE REQUIRED! As well as front wheel chocks if you intend to go more than a few miles at low speeds. Get in a sharp unexpected whoop-de-doo or have to make a quick avoidance manuever at highway speeds and your bikes will depart the trailer if you don't.

Jack it up and feel the wheel bearings by gripping the tires side to side and seeing if there is much play...spin and feel for bearing uneveness. the trailer looks pretty good in the pic, but caveat emptor!



It might be stable at high speed, might not...depends on how well the frame is welded and the frame dimension ratios. Can you take it for a test drive with 500 lbs. of sand? Many different factors influence trailer stability....feel the tongue weight when normally loaded, it should be around 100 to 150 lbs. (10%)



I have a 5X8, but one bike is a BMW, I'm sure I could fit two TW's in a 4X8, back to front.



Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
BuddyMC, TW-Brian and Rocky,



Thank you very much for all the educational information! Lot of good ideas here. Now I am armed with a bunch more knowledge to do my trailer shopping. Like I said, I am new to the trailer thing so this is all extremely helpful.





Be very cautious if you're considering using car tires. Depending upon the total weight in the trailer, car tires on trailers are time bombs.
Why is that? – too much unsprung weight?





OMM – thanks for the info, unfortunately Old White Truck has a canopy and it is too low to admit motorcycles.



Point37 – Thanks but I think you are just a tiny bit too far away.





Here is another one that just popped up. I usually don’t look at railed trailers but this one MIGHT have wide enough rails for the rear TW tire – however, this one also only has a single beam tongue. (The tank in the middle is storage for onboard air).

 

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This is a nice looking trailer, and it's kitted out. I don't see a problem with it not having a braced yoke. It's specifically made to haul multiple bikes in a uniform manner. You can always have a couple of braces welded on if you need to(which I doubt). I also think it wouldn't take much to fit a large box on it for general hauling needs. It's even got a ramp, and are those Bearing Buddies I see?





Ride on
 

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I agree welding some brace's on for the tongue would be a piece of cake. Not sure you would need them

but would be nice though. That's a nice trailer.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I am going to bump my thread here once to try again and see if I can get some clarification on this comment:



Be very cautious if you're considering using car tires. Depending upon the total weight in the trailer, car tires on trailers are time bombs.


Buddy, if you are still checking this, or anyone else that might have an idea, I wanted to find out why car tires can be time bombs?



Thanks
 

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OWT. I was just giving you an idea for the size of the inclosed box that two dubs fit into. (o; We have hauled our dubs 3,000 miles this way with out a problem. OMM.
 

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I am going to bump my thread here once to try again and see if I can get some clarification on this comment:







Buddy, if you are still checking this, or anyone else that might have an idea, I wanted to find out why car tires can be time bombs?



Thanks


Modern radials can be "squirmy" on a trailer. But that mostly pertains to heavily loaded tandem axles where the forward axles tends to cause the rear axle tires to roll under in curves or off-camber situations. Not much of an issue on single-axle, lightly loaded trailers such as bike trailers. I wouldn't sweat it, but technically dedicated trailer tires are either really stiff radials or old school bias plies.
 

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Modern radials can be "squirmy" on a trailer. But that mostly pertains to heavily loaded tandem axles where the forward axles tends to cause the rear axle tires to roll under in curves or off-camber situations. Not much of an issue on single-axle, lightly loaded trailers such as bike trailers. I wouldn't sweat it, but technically dedicated trailer tires are either really stiff radials or old school bias plies.


Yeah. I was thinking something about side wall stifness and heavy loads when I read your first response.



I'd definitly want heavy load rated tires on a trailer. You never know what you are gonna end up haulimg.
 
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